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419-842-1863

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14-07-31 ... 10 Pd. Parrott Shell and Confederate "12 Pounder" Solid Shot:  Both are in immaculate condition for relics. The previous owner selected the absolute BEST he could get. The Parrott is an early war 2.9 inch version. By 1863 Parrott Guns were made with bores of 3 inches. It is complete with the zinc fuse adapter in the nose and brass sabot at the base.  Top notch condition.  The solid shot is a fine Confederate example with distinctive casting flaws. The condition on each is about as good as it gets for relic shells ... Parrott Shell $295.00 ... Solid Shot $195.00 ... (don't forget shipping.) SOLD

 

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14-07-32 ... A Well Used Model 1849 Colt Pocket Revolver: Worn but honest. One line New York barrel address. Four inch barrel.  5 shot cylinder. All matched serial numbers 279466. Complete except for missing wedge screw. Mechanically perfect. Dark patina.  Some moderate pitting, Handling ... Dark and honest ... $565.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-33 ... Civil War Soldier's Wallet w/ Touching Family Note: The pocket book is a classic 1860 wallet with compartments for currency, stamps, etc.  Condition is very good though closing strap is gone.  The accompanying 1939 note reads...  "June 12, 1939 this pocket book belonged to my father and I am giving it to my son John James Baxter, and I wood (sic) like for him to keep it in rememberance (sic) of my father James Maticen Baxter bought it in 1861 and carried it through the war of '61, the civle (sic) war.  John James Baxter cener (senior)"   I wager that the soldier's written name James Maticen Baxter is a phonetic spelling of James Madison Baxter.  Clearly the writer of the letter had some issues with spelling and sentence structure. And naming boys after popular presidents was commonplace during the 19th century. According to civilwardata there are 66 union soldiers named James Baxter. Of those 5 are shown as James M. Baxter. Of those 2 enlisted in 1861, 1 enlisted date unknown, 1 enlisted in 1862, and the last enlisted in 1864. Assuming the 1939 letter is accurate (which is a leap of faith given that the letter was written 74 years after the war) ... but assuming it is accurate, the two soldiers who enlisted in 1861 are James M. Baxter 18th Kentucky and James M. Baxter 15th Illinois Cavalry. The Kentuckian enlisted in October of 1861 but was not mustered in for nearly four months... February 1862. If you have a subscription to Ancestry.com you can trace the descendants of the soldiers and learn which man (if either) had a son and grandson named John James Baxter. Or you might have to trace all 66 James Baxters to determine their offspring. Yippee! A neat artifact and a wonderfully challenging research project for YOU ... $225.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-34 ... 3 Civil War Tough Guys: These 3 hombres look like they want to rule the roost. They all have beards, likely cavalrymen based on the cavalry saber held by the center officer. He also sports a non regulation coat with Custer style galloons on his sleeves, and close scrutiny reveals his officer's eagle buckle quite clearly in focus. Very natty indeed. His pards on either side are drawing on their pipes to satisfy their nicotine addiction or to show how worldly they are. This sixth plate tintype is about as artistically posed as any image I've purchased this year. Interesting subjects. Interesting character study. Fine expressive faces, and interesting accoutrements. VG condition with a couple light scratches and a minor bend. Good clarity. Excellent contrast. Super subjects. Case and mat are about perfect ... $450.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-35 ... Officer's Crimson Sash: Standard US regulation woven silk sash in overall VG++ condition. Full length, great color, both knots solid and in place, and one small "run" in the center of the silk like the way ladies' silk stockings used to "run" back in the old days when ladies used to wear such fine things. Much better quality than most we see. Strong condition and greatccolor ... $650.00 SOLD

14-07-36 ... Early Gilt Bullion Sword Knot: Regulation officer's sword knot. This one is very early Civil War and possibly pre war with thicker tassels on the knot like we see on War of 1812 and Mexican War epaulets. Excellent condition and complete ... $265.00 SOLD

14-07-37 ... Officer's Eagle Buckle: Regulation CW officer's sword belt plate. Excellent in all respects with desirable early war narrow tongue on the back. Worn by most Union officer's and plenty of Rebel Officers as well. A dandy ... $275.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-38 ... Wesson and Leavitt Belt Revolver ... I love these 1840s and 1850s percussion revolvers. There is a lot of variation, a lot of ingenuity, and a lot of artistry in them as they tried to utilize the concept of revolving arms. The Massachusetts Arms Company was one of the first serious competitors for Samuel Colt, had a number of well-known arms dealers involved in it, like Smith and Wesson, and produced a high quality gun. Colt sued them for patent infringement and won in 1851, sending them back to manual hand rotated cylinders for a time.

Here is a good example of the gun that got Sam Colt’s knickers in a twist and in near fine condition: the Wesson and Leavitt Belt Model Revolver, also known as their Pocket Model. Six-shot, .31 caliber, barrel three inches. The metal shows sharp “Mass. Arms & Co./ Chicopee Falls” on the top strap and “Wesson’s & Leavitt’s Patent” markings on the lockplate, as well as the “Wesson’s Patent Aug 28, 1849” on the bevel gear, and serial number 759 and 1850 patent date on the front of the frame, with matching last digit of the serial number elsewhere on the frame. The lock and hammer have beautiful broad scroll engraving and show smooth metal with generous traces of nice purple and gray faded smoky case colors. The wood blends in well, with a good fit to the metal, minor chips to the left side. The butt shows some abuse: some nimrod used it to hammer something and the wood and bottom of the strap show some battering- not very noticeable from the side, but its there. Some of the nipples show a bit of corrosion and impact from the hammer, so this gun did see some use. Cylinder and barrel are a nice even plum color. Front sight in place. Only about 1,000 of these pistols were made in 1850-1851. They are a key piece in the development of revolving arms and the story of the gun in America. More than one traveler in the early west put his faith in the Mass. Arms Company, and a bunch were carried off to war in 1861. Near fine condition ... $1,395.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-39 ... Double Barrel Coat Pistol: Travelers and men out for a stroll in a dangerous area often made it a point to carry a pocket pistol for personal defense. These were inexpensive single shot weapons, easily carried and easily concealed. In this case the owner figured two barrels were better than one and shows nice detail on what was meant to be a very utilitarian gun. The grips are bag-shaped and checkered, and there is broad scroll and leaf engraving on the receiver and an engraved star on the bottom of the triggerguard. Double triggers operate the separate hammers on the side-by-side barrels. The gun was small, but must have carried a decent whallop- the three inch barrels are rifled. Smooth metal overall, gray mixed with darker spots, but no pitting. No sights of course: if you were going to use this, your target was pretty darn close. Some minor shrinkage to the wood, but good edges at the top of the grips. Some previous owner lightly scratched in a license or social security number on the triggerguard tang. I haven't tried to buff it out, but it is not very deep or obtrusive. An inexpensive “little friend” of the late 1840s- early 1850s ... $275.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-40 ... Remington Model 1875 Single Action Army: A real honest to gosh Wild West cowboy revolver. Made from 1875 to 1889, these six-shot revolvers in .44 and .45 Caliber were meant to be competitors for Colt in army contracts, but he had too much of a head start in that market for Remington to effectively catch up. The Remington Single Action was a superb gun and between 25 and 30,000 were manufactured, many making their way west. 7 ½ inch barrel with a batch number “530” on the cylinder. Likely an early production gun: the lanyard ring in the butt was standard on early production guns. This one shows definite signs of use, but it has not been mistreated. Metal is silvery gray overall with darker gray spots. The top of the barrel shows very fine salt-and-pepper scattered pitting, but is still smooth and has clear E. Remington & Sons Ilion, NY, USA barrel markings. Hammer shows hints of case color, ejector assembly gray with dark speckling. Grips are good and show caliber marking of “44W” which refers to 44 Winchester which translates to 44/40 ... The most famous cowboy cartridge. A cowboy could use the same cartridges in his revolver and rifle. Five very small, but deliberately carved notches are evident at the base of the butt on one side. The notches are dead real so the owner was definitely keeping track of something he shot several of! Far far rarer than the Colt Single action and far more affordable. ;One of the fun anomalies of gun collecting, “rarer and less expensive”. A highly sought Cowboy six shooter that seldom turns up for sale ... $2,650.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-41 ... Wartime 1863 Production Colt .36 “Navy” Revolver The .36 Navy was meant to stand in contrast to army .44 caliber revolvers, but became a tremendously popular and widely used medium frame weapon in the civilian market, and in the military. It was widely issued to mounted troops during the Civil War. The 51 Navy has great lines and enough variations to warrant countless magazine articles, and numerous books The Navy is a collecting category of its own. Ours is all matching serial numbers, 156742, (except the loading lever) which dates it to 1863 production. Nice grey patina overall with the metal showing a smoky gray mixed with traces of oxidized blue. Nice grips, smooth wood with no big gouges or losses, a couple of small dings on the butt, and good fit to the metal. Clear Colt single-line New York City barrel address, and caliber markings on the trigger guard. Some scattered light pitting on the rear of the barrel section forward of the cylinder, and on the recoil shield, typical signs of actual use. No cylinder scene visible. A few light dings on the barrel wedge and frame near the loading lever. Screw head all show some beggaring. Loading lever is an original factory replacement from the guns period of use. It is numbered “35” which would be a batch number rather than a serial. A decent used Colt Navy priced far below what brown buckets of rust are bringing at your local auction or gun show. A key Civil War revolver ... $1,075.00 SOLD

 

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FOUR ICONIC ARTIFACTS

14-07-42 ... Custer Cavalryman's Veteran's Ladder Badge:
A local Toledo find, fresh to the market. Classic federal shield motif with scrolls, and Sheridan Corps Badge insignia on the shield. Perfect condition with pin back solidly in place. Veteran J.W. Chappel is John W. Chappel of Perrysburg, Ohio (about ten minutes drive from here). At age 18 John enlisted in Custer's 1st Michigan Cavalry in 1861. He enlisted right here in Toledo which is only about twenty miles from Custer's home in Monroe, Michigan. Chappel stayed with the unit through June of 1865. The 1st Cavalry was part of the famed Michigan Cavalry Brigade or Custer Cavalry Brigade... 1st, 5th, 6th, and 7th Michigan Cavalry regiments. It saw hard service in most of the battles of The Army of the Potomac and Army of the Shenandoah including Gettysburg where the men were armed with 3-band Spencer repeating infantry rifles and went into battle against Wade Hampton's cavalry including a saber charge. The regiment lost at Gettysburg 11 officers and 80 men killed, wounded or missing. On the fourth of July one squadron charged the enemy at Fairfield Gap, driving the confederates and holding it until the entire column passed. Two officers were killed and 17 men were killed or wounded in this charge. The fourteenth of July the First took part in the severe engagement at Falling Waters, where the Cavalry brigade captured 500 prisoners, one field gun, three battle flags and a large quantity of small arms. The First Michigan captured two of the battle flags, one major and 70 men. It was among the forces commanded by General Sheridan in his celebrated raid in the rear of Lee's army and took part in all those severe engagements. It fought at Yellow Tavern where Jeb Stuart was killed. The First, with the balance of the brigade, took part in the severe engagement at Hawes' Shop where the enemy was completely defeated, but only at great sacrifice of life. At Cold Harbor, the troops of the Michigan Cavalry Brigade slept on their arms during the night. Soon after daybreak that portion of the line held by the First Michigan was attacked by a large force of the enemy, which was repulsed. They fought at Trevillian Station, Sheridan's Valley Campaign, Louisa Court House, Five Forks, the pursuit of General Lee's army... at Sailor's Creek the Michigan Brigade destroyed 400 wagons and captured sixteen guns and cut off General Ewell's corps from Lee's army.
Total enrollment..............................................2490
Killed in action...................................................96
Missing in action.................................................40
Died of wounds..................................................52
Died as prisoners of war.....................................58
Died of disease.................................................172
Drowned..............................................................2
Killed accidentally.................................................4
Killed by Indians...................................................1
Discharged for disability......................................209
A wonderful cavalry artifact and more so with the Custer connection ... $1,150.00
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14-07-43 ... Superb US Oval Buckle:
A near perfect Union waist belt plate as worn by the hundreds of thousands of Yankee infantrymen in the Civil War. Has the arrow back hooks firmly in place on the back ... $235.00 SOLD
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14-07-44 ... Beautiful Eagle Motif Tongue Wreath 2-Piece Interlocking Buckle: My favorite form of waist belt plate is this interlocking tongue and wreath design. This specimen is absolutely stunning in terms of die work and condition. The federal eagle is on a lined field and surrounded by stars. The wreath is a finely executed laurel wreath design Circa 1845 and perfect for display with early war US or Confederate effects. Among the best condition examples I have owned ... $1,150.00 SOLD
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14-07-45 ... Beautiful Lincoln Stevengraph by B.B. Tilt:
Eleven inches overall length produced late 19th century at The Phoenix Textile Mills in Patterson, New Jersey by Benjamin Tilt and sons. Eagle, Lincoln, Emancipation proclamation. Executed in the finest woven silk in classic Stevengraph tapestry format. These are called Stevengraphs in reference to Thomas Stevens, an English weaver, who adapted the looms in Coventry to weave colorful pictures from silk. In 1862, Stevens could produce only four different designs ...  by the late 1880s over 900; they became known as "Stevengraphs". Numerous American firms produced likewise beautiful woven silk tapestry ribbons, book marks, etc. which we also call Stevengraphs.  A darn fine example and very collectible with the iconic Lincoln ... $150.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-46 ... Regulation CW Enlisted Forage Cap aka Bummer's Cap: This one has nice provenance going back over 20 years identifying it as being worn by William Marks Co."F" 11th Pennsylvania Infantry March 1864 - July 1865. This cap truly falls in line with the period description of the caps being "as shapeless as a feed bag". It is complete except for the chin strap and side buttons. We have included a perfect replica chin strap for you to attach. The cap has a couple minor moth nips but is overall excellent with good life. It has the full compliment of brown polished cotton lining, and the complete sweat band. Most importantly the cap shows absolute real war time use. The sheen is worn off the polished cotton lining as is seen on real sweat worn caps. Likewise the sweat band shows that it absorbed a lot of sweat during it's service as well. No question this cap was issued. Not one of the Bannerman surplus caps we all love despite their surplus status. This one was originally found at an estate sale by a collector named Duane Miller in Sunbury, PA back around 1990. The previous owners have all written a letter detailing the chain of ownership up to the last sale in 1992. While Marks was with the 11th they fought with the Army of the Potomac, and took horrific casualties at The Wilderness and Spotsylvania. It then endured the Petersburg campaign under constant fire, and battle casualties and KIAs at Weldon RailRoad, Five Forks, and Hatcher's Run. A good solid forage cap that was really there ... $2,450.00

 

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14-07-47 ... Fine Batty Peace Flask: Complete and mechanically perfect. Has a beautiful undisturbed age patina. Nicely marked Batty. Inspected RHKW and dated 1854. Perfect for display with a Mississippi rifle or all by itself on the wall. One of the most attractive US accoutrements ever designed ... $495.00 SOLD

14-07-48 ... US Buckle w/ Superb Patina:
Like the Peace Flask above the patina is rich, smooth, and undisturbed.  Has arrow hooks and prong firmly in place.  Just the way Billy Yank brought it home. Great color ... $245.00 SOLD

14-07-49 ... Soldier's Testament & Prayer Card / Likely 101st Pennsylvania Vols.:
Testament is fine+ condition crudely inscribed inside with ownership by Franklin Donaha and being a gift from John Donaha. Also in the Testament is a fine Soldier's Prayer Card which bears two prayers and again the names of John and Franklin Donaha. Checking civilwardata there are no soldiers named Donaha... but there is a Franklin Donahoe. In fact he is the only "Franklin" listed with last name beginning with Donah ... Assuming this is our man he served in the 101st Pennsylvania and was wounded and taken prisoner at Plymouth North Carolina and shortly later died in Raleigh North Carolina. A very nice display lot ... $275.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-50 ... Civil War Fifteenth Corps Badge: The real McCoy - It’s nice to have a real corps badge amid all the fakes at the shows and on-line auctions. This is the “Tiffany style,” so called because one of the extant variations are found marked by Tiffany Company on the back. The badge was formally adopted in February, 1865, by order of Major General Logan and shows up in a number of photographs- most well known is the colorguard of the 7th Illinois, but I have had a number of CDVs of other soldiers wearing them. The badge is stamped brass 2 ¼ inches from point to point, with a raised stamped rectangle in the center, which carries the applied enameled cartridge box and the motto “forty rounds.” These survive with pin packs as well as loop attachments. This specimen was intended to be worn on the cap or hat with loops that were not well secured. They are missing on this example though the solder footings are clearly visible where they once were. Ours retains the original red paint, about 80-90 percent remaining, that indicates the First Division. A collector or dealer noted “15th” in pencil on the reverse.

The Fifteenth Corps had a long history as fighting corps out west under Sherman, with elements having battle honors all the way back to Wilson’s Creek, and fighting at Vicksburg, Lookout Mountain, Resaca, New Hope Church and many others, later participating in the Atlanta Campaign and Sherman’s March to the Sea as part of the Army of the Tennessee under Howard. In 1865 it followed Sherman in the Campaign of the Carolinas, ending in the surrender of Johnston. A good example of an unambiguously real and wartime corps badge ... $650.00 SOLD

14-07-51 ... Gold Ninth Corps Badge: These small (1.25 inch), finely engraved Ninth Corps badges show up only occasionally. They are jeweler made and were supplied by mail order to troops in the field for a dollar. I once had an 1864-65 advertisement showing an exact example and giving the sellers name. It may have been B.T. Hayward of New York. Stan Phillips illustrates one in his classic reference book on corps badges that is not only engraved with the officers name and unit but shown in period cdv on the breast of the officer in uniform. This is a hollow two-piece stamped construction of rose gold with a T-bar back in place. The basic cannon and fouled anchor design was produced in the stamping, but the individual details were then chased by hand and the anchor and cannon areas filled with colored enamel to indicate the division- in this case blue, for the Third Division. The badge was officially adopted in April, 1864. The Third Division saw very heavy fighting under Wilcox from April through September. Due to combat losses in the corps, the Third Division was redesignated the First in September, though the men continued to wear their old badges at least until the Third Division was reconstituted under Hartranft late that year with other troops, who would then have taken on the blue division badges. Very fine condition. The loop of the anchor is not colored and does not seem to have received the enamel. This seems a common characteristic of the type- I know of a red, First Division, example showing the same thing. Another dead-real wartime badge ... $595.00 SOLD

 

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14-07-52 ... Very Rare French Officer’s Saber for an Officer of National Volunteers under the Constitutional Monarchy of 1789-1792. An extremely rare sword from the days of the French Revolution. Missing the elaborate guard that shows Athena and the triumph of the revolutionary ideology, but retaining the even scarcer original scabbard and worthy of restoration. Or if you need an original scabbard I dare say this is the only one on the market this year. Characteristic knights helmet pommel in place. Blade is bright mixed with gray and dark spots but showing very clearly the engraved martial motifs on both sides which retain most of their gilt fill. Good edge without nicks. Wire and some of the copper tape is present on the grip, wood is sturdy, but leather wrap should be redone. The scabbard is exceptionally rare: the leather is in very good condition, middle mount gone, but the drag and upper mount with carrying ring are present. This sword is a very scarce blade from the beginning of the French Revolution and the many wars and conflicts that followed, which threw Europe into turmoil. Swords with damaged or broken blades sometimes show up with good guards and this would be well worth acquiring to keep on hand to complete a restoration ... $695.00

 

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14-07-53 ... Cincinnati Dealer Marked Remington Vest Pocket Pistol: This is one of many of the small derringer type pistols I like. Also known as the “Saw Handle Derringer” this was the Remington “Number 1” made in .22 caliber rimfire between 1865 and 1888. Single shot with walnut grips, the hammer also acts as a breechblock. A muted silver gray overall. Some scattered brown spots on the right side. The pistol still has its small front sight and shows a very legible Remington barrel legend “Remington’s Ilion NY Patent Oct. 1 ,1861” in two lines with just some rubbing on the beginning of the firm name. The left side shows the well known and highly sought Cincinnati dealer marking: “B. Kittredge & Co.” in an arc over “Cin O” with some rubbing in the center of the arc. Kittredge was a well known supplier of guns and equipment not only to military customers (his copper cartridge boxes are always sought after), but also to travelers going down the Ohio river through Cincinnati toward St. Louis and The West. These little gems are darn scarce. They are a small but effective weapon that was easily concealed in a vest pocket or garter, and while not intended for long distance work (unless you consider a yard long distance) it could save a man’s life in a tight spot at the card table. Funny that Remington bothered with a front sight at all... but who knows... with careful aim maybe you could hit a barn door at 10 paces. Perfect gambler or river boat or saloon girl display item ... zfjjp ... $750.00

 

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14-07-54 ... Model 1842 Pistol Cartridge Box: ... Real Mexican War era, early frontier army, regulation cartridge box for the Aston and Johnson 54 caliber horse pistols. It is intended to be worn on the belt only with no provisions for a shoulder sling. Has a single tin with five upper compartments. Minor scuffing on the top edge, a bit stiff on part of the flap. Very nice, clear Dingee, New York, maker stamp on the inner flap. Latch tab is broken. Pieces are there and it could be redone, but I have left it as is. A scarce cartridge box ... $325.00

 

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14-07-55 ... Wonderfully Folky Decorated Musket Stock --- Indian??? I don’t know if this is an American Indian altered piece or just a piece of wonderful American folk art. This is the stock and lock of an 1809 German Pottsdam musket that was altered to percussion (for issue in the Civil War) and then cut down for ease in handling (by an Indian?). It was decorated by the last owner using a great Federal eagle engraved oval silver plaque that is virtually identical to the eagle on Washington 1789 Inaugural buttons, and Federalist pieces of insignia. This silver eagle plaque certainly dates ca. 1790, and may be an early piece of trade silver. Also inlaid into the stock are dozens of tiny pieces of brass scavenged from thinning the brass buttplate. Curved pieces of flat brass are inlet forward of the silver oval in the form of an open beak, giving the appearance of a crude bird’s head or perhaps a serpent’s head. Trailing behind the oval plaque is a spray of brass rectangular bits shaved off the buttplate that form a long tail with a diamond shaped tip. A similar spray, without a tip, seems to shoot forward from the beak. On the opposite side a similar tail arrangement flows from a flat brass trapezoid surrounded by a frame of the same brass strips with a similar spray at the forward end. Some of these little strips are also inlaid on either side next to a small plate rear of the musket side plate. One last small brass piece forms a wrist escutcheon of sorts. This is a tremendously interesting and mysterious piece. The lock and forward band are still present. I have left it uncleaned and untouched. If you have a shortened Pottsdam barrel lying around you can easily restore this to the early trade gun it once was, perfect for an early western display. From my perspective it is a wonderful frontier relic just the way it stands ... $595.00 SOLD

 

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