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Dave Taylor
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419-842-1863

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14-08-01 ... One of the Most Exciting Civil War Firearms we have ever offered! Fine Brevet Colt Navy Revolver of Colonel Wm. H. Irwin 49th Pennsylvania Vols - Wounded in Action at Chancellorsville and Cited for Gallantry at Antietam: A stellar Brevet Navy with magnificent silver presentation plaque on the right grip. It is inscribed “Presented to Col. W. H. Irwin as a testimonial of respect and esteem by the non commissioned officers and privates of Co. C & E Feb. 22nd 1862”. A top drawer European made Colt Navy in near fine condition. 100% original, 100% complete, cocks and indexes, but hand spring is weak and cylinder stop spring is weak. Very handsome and most historical. Col. Wm. H. Irwin hailed from Mifflen county. He started as the Colonel of the 7th Penna. Vols in 1861 and then was commissioned Colonel of the 49th P.V. Feb. 28th 1862 which meshes nicely with the presentation date on the revolver. At Williamsburg Colonel Irwin received the thanks of Generals Hancock and McClellan on the field, the latter saying, "Colonel, I thank you for the magnificent conduct of your regiment; no men could have done better." At Antietam Irwin was a Brigade Commander in Smith’s Division.  The marker on the battlefield reads… “Irwin's Brigade came on the field about noon of the 17th, and formed across the Smoketown Road in rear of a line of Artillery. After an unsuccessful attempt to penetrate the Confederate line south of the Dunkard Church,  the Brigade rallied behind the ridge east of the Hagerstown Pike and between it and Mumma's Lane, the left of the Brigade resting a few yards west of the lane, where it was exposed to a severe fire of Artillery and Sharpshooters. About 5 P.M., the 7th Maine, on the left of the Brigade, crossed Mumma's Lane, moved obliquely across the front of Brook's Brigade, charged over the Bloody Lane at this point, dispersed the Confederates in its front and in the orchard on its left and reached the low ground North of Piper's Barn, when the enemy from behind the stone fence on the Hagerstown Pike and the hill adjoining poured a severe fire on its right flank and front. The regiment then obliqued to the left, passed through an opening in the fence into the orchard and to within 70 yards of Piper's House, here it was met by a withering fire from a column of the enemy moving down the hill east of the house and driven back through the orchard with great loss.”  At the battle Irwin’s Brigade consisted of the 7th Maine Infantry, 20th 33d, 49th and 77th New York Infantry Regiments. At the beginning of Chancellorsville, on the morning of the 29th of April, the pontoon boats were carried upon the backs of the men to the bank of the river, and Russell's Brigade was embarked for its passage. When half way over, the enemy opened fire. Of the 49th Penna. Colonel Irwin was wounded by a minie ball in the foot, Captain Freeburn mortally wounded; two privates were killed and eight others wounded.  But the men pushed resolutely across, and held the enemy at bay until the bridge was laid and the troops began to follow.  Irwin was later sent to the hospital.  He remained in the service for several more months but eventually resigned in the fall of 1863 due to his wound. This gun was undoubtedly with him during all his adventures. It is seldom that we find a beautifully inscribed weapon that is highly attractive and has an incredible battle history all in “one serving”. This revolver is truly a beautiful firearm, and visually & historically exciting. I can’t recall the last time I’ve offered something with all these bells and whistles. Don’t bitch about the price,  I only marked it up a little ... $8,950.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-02 ... Samuel Holt CDV:    A nicely toned and very forcefully posed portrait of a dashing sergeant, signed in ink across the bottom: “Sergt. S. L. Holt.” Samuel L. Holt was a 26 year-old resident of Marlborough, MA, when he enlisted in the 5th Massachusetts on 8/20/62 and mustered in as a sergeant in Co. I on 9/16/62.  The regiment was a militia unit that had served before and enlisted again for a nine-month stint and was sent to North Carolina, where it participated in the expeditions to Williamstown, Goldsboro and Washington, and participated in the battles of Kinston, Whitehall, and Goldsboro. Holt mustered out with the regiment 7/2/63. He was an Engineer by profession and after remaining home for a year, received a commission in the US Navy on 8/3/64 as Acting Third Assistant Engineer, serving until 9/6/65 on board the USS Honduras and in the East Gulf Squadron. Holt is shown full standing with arms crossed and a no-nonsense look on his face.  His chevrons are visible on his sleeve and the sergeant’s stripe on his trousers.  He wears an officer’s style sword belt with a holstered revolver on his hip and his NCO sword sheathed suspended in a belt frog. Interestingly, he wears a sash, indicating he was serving as the company First Sergeant or performing some duty on the regimental non-commissioned staff.  Small collector notations on reverse. No backmark. Very nice clarity and tones, and a striking subject ... fj - gracey ... $135.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-03 ... Gritty NCO James Litchfield CDV: Another CDV of an NCO with excellent clarity and tonal contrast. Half-length close up seated pose wearing a forage cap, sergeant’s frock coat, infantry waist belt with vividly clear US plate and cap pouch. This card is signed “Jas. A. Litchfield.” in a bold style that reflects the casual, yet confident pose. Period ink note on reverse: “Co. F 40 Reg./ Mass Vol” Brady, NY backmark, small collector notations in pencil.
James Andrew Litchfield was a 21 year-old carpenter in Boston when he enlisted 8/12/62 and mustered into Co. F on 9/3/62. Litchfield was promoted to First Sergeant and then to First Lieutenant on 11/24/64. He mustered out 6/16/65 and after the war was a member of GAR posts in Fitchburg, Dorchester, and Somerville, Mass., until his death in 1926.

The 40th Mass had an interesting history, serving on the Peninsula, then with the Army of the Potomac, followed by a transfer to South Carolina with action at Fort Wagner, participation in the Florida campaign and the fights at Gainesville, Olustee and Cedar Run, then back up to the Army of the James where it fought at Drewry’s Bluff, Bermuda Hundred, Cold Harbor and Petersburg. During its assignment to the Florida expedition it was assigned to the “Light Brigade” and used as mounted infantry. CWdata lists 34 occasions where they took casualties and lists 5 officers and 67 men as killed or mortally wounded. The actual totals, of course, are likely to be higher. Litchfield must have been a good soldier to earn his promotions and commission ... ej - gracey ... $125.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-04 ... Inscribed Colt Pocket Pistol of Massachusetts Sergeant G.W. L. Reed, 33rd Mass. Vol. Infantry (Gettysburg Regiment) and the Veteran Reserve Corps: This gun came from the estate of my late friend Arthur Marchand who lived just outside Boston.  He had acquired it locally. I am generally skeptical on identifications based only on a last name and first initials, but when you have three initials and a last name to work with that is a different story. There were 413 G. Reeds in the Union Army. Of those 100 are G.W. Reed... of those only ONE is G.W.L. Reed.  Without the 21st century internet the research would likely not have been possible. But using Fold-3, Google, and Newspapers.com the job became manageable.   I do not believe Arthur ever succeeded in tracking down the history on the revolver as he bought the gun long before the internet, and the old state roster books were impossible to search comprehensively as no one had all the states rosters in one central library. The internet sure solves that problem.   Our man is George W. L. Reed / Co. A  33rd / Mass. Infantry. (For the additionally curious a letter mentioning him as GWL Reed by a tent mate, Archibald Waugh, will show up with a google search.) Reed was a Bill poster by trade in Lowell, Mass, and 32 years-old when he enlisted as a Sergeant on 8/6/62 and mustered into Co. A of the 33rd Mass. On 8/9/62. He transferred to the Veteran Reserve Corps 10/1/63 and was assigned to the 63rd Co. 2nd Battalion, and was formally discharged from the 33rd Mass on 3/15/65. After the war he lived in Taunton, where he died in 1925.

My late good friend, and collector extraordinaire, John Henry Kurtz would have liked this gun- he had a soft spot for the 33rd Mass. The regiment was part of the 11th Corps and served in Barlow’s Brigade in Von Steinwehr’s Division. At Chancellorsville it escaped major loss, but at Gettysburg it fought at dusk of July 2 between Cemetery Hill and Culp’s Hill where it suffered 8 killed and 38 wounded. In the Fall it went west with the rest of the Corps and saw hard fighting at Wauhatchie, Resaca, Dallas, Kennesaw, the siege of Atlanta, March to the Sea, etc.

Pocket pistols were often purchased by soldiers going off to war or given to them by well-meaning loved ones. Reed’s five-inch barrel Colt 1849 Pocket Revolver is nicely engraved G.W.L. Reed on the butt strap and numbered 211356, which gives it an 1862 manufacture date, tying in nicely with Reed’s date of enlistment. As shown by our photo of Sergeant Holt above, Sergeant Reed may even have worn the pistol as a sidearm on duty.   This is in NRA very good condition showing nice gray patina and some faded blue in protected areas.  The grips are VG, with handling marks and scratches on the bottom of the butt, and one minor chip. The cylinder shows a bit bright from handling and wear.  Traces of cylinder scene remain and for some reason several rows of tiny dots. Loading lever assembly in place, mechanically functional, nice tone to the brass, giving a very nice overall look ...   A darn nice historical firearm $2,395.00 SOLD

 

 

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14-08-05 ... CDV of dapper infantry officer Jacob Lombard CDV: Full-standing Yankee line officer who fought in North Carolina. This dapper infantry officer holds his forage cap in front of him in folded hands, showing part of its infantry insignia, and wears a regulation officer’s frock coat with light blue trousers. A big set of straps mark his shoulders and he wears his foot officer’s sword high up on the carrying hook of his officer’s sword belt that sports a shoulder support strap. Silsbee, Case and Co., Boston, backmark. A nice shot, minor faint foxing spots to the left, not affecting the image.  A collector note on reverse in pencil identifies him as Jacob H. Lombard of the 44th Mass, and civilwardata confirms the identification with another photo of him taken in the same studio in a different pose. Jacob Hall Lombard was 25 years old and a clerk in Boston. He enlisted 5/26/62 and was commissioned the next day as a 2nd Lieutenant in Co. A 4th Battalion Mass. Infantry. This was a militia outfit called up for a thirty-day tour of duty, but given permission to recruit up to regimental strength and so was mustered out almost immediately. Recuiting then started for a nine-month outfit. Lombard then received a commission dating to 8/22/62 as Captain Co. C in the regiment which was then designated 44th Mass. Infantry. The regiment was sent to New Berne, NC., where it became part of Foster’s 18th Corps. The regiment lost its first men in action in October while on an expedition from Little Washington to Rawles Mill, Williamston and Tarboro. In December it went on the Goldsboro Expedition, losing 8 killed and 10 wounded at Whitehall. Lombard resigned his commission in January, 1863, and was discharged for disability. He died in 1875 ... dj - gracey ... $95.00

 

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14-08-06 ... Full-standing infantry sergeant Willie Franklin CDV: Period pencil ID at top reverse: “Willie Franklyn” Below that a collector note giving his company and regiment. Barrett, Stoneham, Mass., backmark. Franklyn aka Frankland is posed in a photographer’s studio in his sergeant’s frock coat with chevrons prominently shown, and a forage cap on his head, one hand on hip, the other behind his back. He shows up as “Frankland, William H.” in the records. Born in England, he was 27 years old and a blacksmith when he enlisted on 7/13/62 and mustered in as a corporal in Co. A, 35th Mass. Infantry. He made Sergeant at a date not stated, and was discharged for disability in Boston on 11/3/63. After the war he lived in Ashland, Mass.

The regiment was a hard-fighting Ninth Corps outfit, losing 10 officers and 138 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded during the war. During Frankland’s service they saw heavy fighting at South Mountain, Antietam and Fredericksburg. At Antietam alone they suffered 50 killed 186 wounded and 16 missing according to CW data and 214 total according to the state history, which included 69 killed and mortally wounded. During the latter part of Frankland’s service the outfit was sent west to Kentucky, Mississippi, and Tennessee, in the course of which they assisted at the siege of Vicksburg and the capture of Jackson, Miss. Images of sergeants are a good collecting field on their own. These were the guys who really ran things in the company of a day-to-day basis and it took a good deal of character to associate so closely with the men every hour of the day and still maintain some authority when it counted ... dj - gracey ... $75.00 SOLD

 

 

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14-08-07 ... CDV - A dead-ringer for Thomas Chamberlain, 20th Maine. This dynamically posed infantry line officer is unidentified, but bears a striking resemblance to Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain’s brother Thomas, who served as a Captain beside his famous brother.  I doubt it is Thomas as our man parts his hair on the left whereas Chamberlain parted his on the right.  Maybe it’s just the mutton-chop sideburns and slicked down hair, or maybe it is a photo of Chamberlain with his hair parted differently???  An infantry officer’s insignia peeks from under the sloped crown of this officer’s forage cap on the table next to it, but the number cannot be made out. Whoever he is, he took one heck of a photo. Posed confidently with arms folded, turned slightly to one side in the photographer’s studio, he shows off his officer’s sword and sash, frock coat with shoulder straps and high boots. Brady, NY, photographer stamp on bottom edges and backmark.  Two small spots on lower right not affecting image, some spotting and residue of something that dripped on the lower edge reverse, again, not affecting the image. A great looking photo,  If this is Tom Chamberlain it's worth ten times more than my price ... dj - gracey ... $125.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-08 ... 14-01-48 ... Ames Civil War NCO Sword and Scabbard: Regulation m1840 US Non Commissioned Officer’s sword made and marked by Ames Mfg. Co. and dated 186? with full inspector’s marks. (The last digit of the date appears to have not been struck, or was struck so light as to not be legible.) Sword is VG to Fine condition. Blade excellent. The scabbard is the original and proper brass mounted leather type. When we found this it had a break in the leather scabbard and some loss above the drag. The original drag was still present. I had helper Tom repair this using a small section of original leather NCO sheath that I had saved from another example. He did a great repair. Beautiful patina on all the brass.
This is the sword carried by corporals and sergeant’s in the Union Infantry ... $395.00

 

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14-08-09 ... 1838 Dated Johnson Percussion Pistol: 1836 Pattern First Contract US Pistol by Johnson with Percussion Conversion:   Here’s an example of the same pattern .54 caliber single shot pistol as the Waters offered a bit further up the list, but made by Johnson, and produced under the first contract awarded for these guns, in June 1836. Johnson agreed to produce 3,000 of these weapons at $9.00 each. This gun shows clear lock markings: U.S. / R. Johnson/ Middn Conn/1838, and clear barrel proofs: US/ JH/P.   Rear sight dish, front sight and rammer assembly are in place.   All the iron mountings are good, smooth metal, gray with purplish/maroon mixed in and darker gray on the lock.   Some minor dings at the breech and some slight firing corrosion from using percussion caps after conversion.  The conversion was done using the side-lug bolster system, grinding off the brass pan, and fitting a percussion bolster at the touch-hole position. Holes for the external flintlock parts were left empty and the hammer is a civilian style, with some faint decoration and a ridge above the face. The nipple has been battered slightly and there is some corrosion on the barrel next to it showing it has actually been used. The rammer has also worn through the wood of the ramrod channel slightly behind the barrel band from use. Wood around the lockplate is generally tight, one slight flake on the bottom edge. The civilian style hammer makes this gun quite a bit more attractive than most we find... and also gives it a hint of possibility of use by a Southern Boy.   Many smaller militia units used local gunsmiths to update their weapons as needed, and those which escaped conversion early were sometimes rushed to a gunsmith as the war approached. An attractively designed pistol and a great variation of a US single shot military pistol ... $650.00

 

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14-08-10 ... 1861 Pattern Infantry Cartridge Box and Sling Set:   This is the standard regulation issue cartridge box rig for the Yankee infantryman, intended to carry “40 Rounds” along with cleaning tools, etc., in the implement pouch. The box is maker marked on the inner flap by “W.S. Hansell & Sons/ Phil.” who had contracts with the US government for both cap pouches and .58 Cal. Infantry accouterments. The box is the very early war 1861 pattern utilizing only a straight line of stitching on the closing tab on the flap. The box comes with a perfect replica bridle leather shoulder sling, that the previous owner never knew wasn't genuine.  It has been with the box for decades and would fool 98% of most current collectors...  But it is a forty year old copy.  The box retains both interior magazine tins, and the cartridge box plate and eagle shoulder belt plate are genuine. Excellent condition overall, very solid, super finish with no flaking. Just the kind of set you want to find and seldom do anymore.  Displays like a $1500 rig but far more affordable with the new sling... A bargain at  ... dej - gracey ... $695.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-11 ... E Robinson New York US Civil War Regulation Issue Knapsack: This is the quintessential Civil War knapsack- known to collectors as the “double-bag” or 1855 pattern. Every infantry soldier was issued one of these during his service, and most went through several. Sometimes stripped off and abandoned when going into action, many soldiers later kept them with them since plundering knapsacks was a common occupation of “coffee-boilers” who kept to the rear when danger threatened. The bag section nearest one’s back buckled with two straps; the outer section opened with a flap and had rawhide tie-down thongs. Straps were provided to shoulder the pack and one side was rigged with a hook and ring on the bottom to enable the soldier to quickly unsling it. Attached to the shoulder straps are a set of cross straps with brass hooks originally designed to hook into the 1855 pattern rifleman’s belt, but used by Civil War soldiers just to hold the shoulder straps together or jury-rigged to the waistbelt.  This is in exceptionally good condition, solid, a couple of very minor holes or separation lines, full straps. One of the little roller buckles pulled loose and I had helper Tom re-attach it.   Nicely marked by famed accoutrement maker “E. Robinson / New York”.   Most of these Robinson packs are from his 1864 contract and are so dated: This one is likely from his 1862 contract since marked contract dates became required in 1864.  These used to be available in stacks and bundles from surplus dealer Francis Bannerman, but that was long ago. In the 1970s we could still buy these in perfect condition for around four dollars... damaged examples were less than two dollars!  Man how times have changed.   A nice early-to-midwar example and all the rarer for it ... abe ... $225.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-12 ... Handsome Ca. 1835-1840 Eagle Pommel US Sword: The angular eaglehead pommel of this sword, arched collar of the eaglehead, scrolled guard, etc., look very much like the work of F. W. Widmann of Philadelphia, but are likely an imported Solingen made product. There is possibly a signature on the ricasso under the guard... I see a letter "S" but that's all I can make out.   This straight-bladed eagle head has a spadroon blade with a single broad fuller running about 2/3rds  its length rather than close to the tip.  The floral and trophy motifs engraved on the blade and at the ricasso are fairly generic.  The eagle pommel is very well done:  The grip is magnificently patinated carved bone,  oval in cross-section and bound with twisted gilt brass wire. The knuckleguard has a scroll top and bottom, a trophy of arms midway on the flat on the outboard side and an oval cartouche on the inboard. At the base of the grip is very finely detailed ferrule and the downturned counterguard features a rakishly angled US eagle with shield, arrows, and olive branches amid swirling clouds. The blade is dark smokey purple from faded bluing, but traces of gilt remain in the engraving here and there. Blade edge is good, no nicks, no pitting or rust. A superior example of an early US officer’s sword from the period of the Alamo, Seminole Wars, etc.   cge/sono  ... $475.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-13  ... Early 19th Century Mahogany Body 3 Foot Telescope by T. Harris & Son:  Made by one of England's pre-eminent instrument makers.  A monstrous 36 inches long when fully extended,  a manageable 14 1/2" end to end when closed.  Thomas Harris and Son produced telescopes, microscopes, sundials, miniature globes and other scientific instruments between 1806-1846.  This example is in wonderful condition, with only one small stress crack in the mahagony that doesn't appear to go all the way through ... Nicely hand signed on the small tube with full maker's name and location. Their early signatures were executed in engraved script.  The serifed Roman characters we have here are from the 1830s-1840s period.   Perfect for east coast whaling display, Mexican War or Civil War military display.  Optics function well.  A truly handsome antique  ... bbe ... $385.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-14 ... Spanish-American War US Navy Officer’s Sword: This is the pattern of sword carried by naval officers who served during the period when the United States announced it's arrival on the international stage by the appearance of its navy in waters all over the world.  From the far east to the southern hemisphere our navy was present across the globe.   These swords are often mistaken by beginning collectors for Civil War pieces.  The overall design is nearly identical to the 1852 pattern, but the main thing to notice is that the blade is much lighter.  The gilt brass hilt and scabbard mountings are much the same, as is the wire bound rayskin grip, eagle with stars pattern pommel, dolphin head quillon, and roped scabbard ring mounts.  This is a top notch example.  The grip is super, the leather washer - bumper is in place,  and the leather scabbard is full length and undamaged, just a few minor dings on the middle brass mount.  The mounts show much gilt in protected areas mixed with a beautiful light brass patina over the balance.  The blade is superb, near mint,  bright with vivid etching.  Very clear M.C. Lilley & Co. markings at the ricasso.    M.C. Lilley & Co. started in business in 1867.  According to Bazelon (p. 165) the formal firm name after June, 1882, was “The M.C. Lilly Company,” suggesting that this could be one of their early products.  My feeling is that it was made 1880s to 1890s.  Both the blade at the ricasso and the middle mount show the small stamped number “47,” showing that they have been together forever. A very handsome and very affordable sword ... $235.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-15 ... 14-07-46 ... Regulation CW Enlisted Forage Cap aka Bummer's Cap: This one has nice provenance going back over 20 years identifying it as being worn by William Marks Co."F" 11th Pennsylvania Infantry March 1864 - July 1865. This cap truly falls in line with the period description of the caps being "as shapeless as a feed bag". It is complete except for the chin strap and side buttons. We have included a perfect replica chin strap for you to attach. The cap has a couple minor moth nips but is overall excellent with good life. It has the full compliment of brown polished cotton lining, and the complete sweat band. Most importantly the cap shows absolute real war time use. The sheen is worn off the polished cotton lining as is seen on real army worn caps. Likewise the sweat band shows that it absorbed a lot of sweat during it's service as well. No question this cap was issued. Not one of the Bannerman surplus caps we all love despite their surplus status. This one was originally found at an estate sale by a collector named Duane Miller in Sunbury, PA back around 1990. The previous owners have all written a letter detailing the chain of ownership up to the last sale in 1992. While Marks was with the 11th they fought with the Army of the Potomac, and took horrific casualties at The Wilderness and Spotsylvania. It then endured the Petersburg campaign under constant fire, and battle casualties and KIAs at Weldon RailRoad, Five Forks, and Hatcher's Run. We listed this three weeks ago at a realistic $2,450 and it did not sell.   So here it is priced DARN friendly... If it doesn't sell this week I'll put on an antique chin strap and original buttons and raise the price back up :)   A good solid forage cap that was really there ... $2,150.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-16 ... Exquisite Chisel Engraved Pinfire Pocket Revolver: engraved pinfire pocket pistol: French or Belgian,  totally unmarked.  Circa 1860s to 1870s.  Very striking with superb engraving overall.   Large floral sprays and scrolls are engraved over the frame, cylinder, recoil shield, and barrel. The engraving is vividly highlighted against a dark background.  Fine ebony checkered grips,  round in cross section with no damage.  3 1/2 inch barrel.  Loading gate and ejecting rod in place. Looks like 6 or 7 mm bore size.  (around 32 caliber).  Mechanically perfect,  Guardless, folding trigger to enable it to be easily concealed and quickly drawn. Barrel graying with some dark spots, faded blue and case on the recoil shield, lots of darkened bluing left to highlight the engraving and traces mixed with gray on the inner butt strap, which also has an old inventory number stamped on it: ING215. A very striking and pleasing pistol.  About the same size as our Allen & Wheelock .32 caliber pocket pistols  ... zay ... $295.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-17 ... 1855 Springfield Pistol Carbine:
A solid, representative example of a very scarce gun that is a key piece for a US arms collection.  One of only three handguns made at the Springfield Arsenal for the army, the pistol-carbine was meant to fill a dual role for troops fighting on horseback and on foot.  A tad over 4,000 were made from 1855 to 1857 before common sense and the Colt revolver replaced it.  These are .58 caliber and used the revolutionary Maynard tape priming system, which turned out to have its own problems.  Ours is NRA Very Good condition.  100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect.  It has a very clear U.S. Springfield marking forward of the hammer, and a visible though rubbed eagle on the primer door. The date at rear of the lock plate is about worn away.  The only wart on this is that a previous owner over-stamped the 1855 tang date under the rear sight with a "186", making it look like 1865.  You can clearly see the original "5" under the overstamped "6". Typical of gun collectors from the 1960s and earlier era who tried to improve markings.   Clear VP/eagle proofs at left breech of barrel. Barrel is smooth metal, gray overall. Wood of pistol has been lightly cleaned, but still shows a good cartouche on the left side. A number of dings and dark spots, brass yellowish, but not bright.   Mechanism good, rammer assembly, swivel and butt ring in place.   Minor firing corrosion near nipple, but nipple is not battered and bolster and screw are good. Bench number 13 on the pistol. Stock shows bench number 5.  The original stock is the true rarity on this gun.  We find the pistols quite frequently but not the stocks.  In fact that stocks command more money as a separate item than the pistols do.  I can sell a stock in this condition for the lion's share of $3000 all by itself.  Here is the whole shooting match priced very realistically   ... dbej ... $4,750.00

 

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14-08-18 ... 1858 Double Action Starr Revolver w/ 3 Digit Serial Number: Starr’s double action .44 army revolvers were an ingenious way to increase rates of fire by doing away with the need to cock the hammer by thumb. The only problem was that the trigger pressure necessary to do it, effectively threw the gun out of line anyway. They are a hefty revolver and quite attractive in their own way, just a little too much ingenuity in the engineering. Starr made about 23,000 of these and most went to the government. Around 1863 they redesigned the pistol with a longer barrel and simplified it to single-action. Next to Colts and Remingtons, Starrs were the most widely purchased and used revolvers in the Civil War. If you want an inexpensive example to work on, or for display without breaking the bank, here’s a chance. This just came on the market fresh from an estate. It is a great looking gun that just needs a couple parts. Smooth gray metal overall, good Starr markings on both sides of the frame. Needs the rammer plunger of the loading lever assembly (can be made from steel rod), the heavy screw that secures the hinged frame (replicas are available), and the forward screw in the trigger guard. Replace those and you have a complete gun. The lever retaining screw is partly there, the head gone. Cylinder and loading lever match with number 848. Minor dings here and there to the metal, also to the grips with some divots on the outboard side upper half. Here is a gift priced CW revolver ... cbe ... $575.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-19 Early Indian War Brigadier General’s Frock Coat with Civil War General’s Epaulets: Ultra fine condition, and top quality Brigadier General’s frock coat, double breasted with superb NY staff buttons arranged by twos as per regulation for the rank of brigadier during the Civil War and for some time thereafter. Virtually identical to Civil War examples... just a little less shape to the sleeve a slightly shorter skirt, and a lining material that is typical of the 1870s era. Coat has functional three-button cuffs, four tail buttons and rear pockets as is correct per regulations, nice black velvet collar and cuff trim the same as Civil War. Full black cotton-silk blend body lining with quilted upper section and striped white sleeve linings, interior waistbelt is in place. With the coat is a rare set of wartime brigadier general epaulets original to it, sporting fancy red linings, correct field-grade width fringe and silver bullion embroidered five-pointed stars. Finding real CW generals epaulets is a darn rare event.

The coat buttons are New York State staff buttons indicating the coat was made for an officer in that state’s National Guard or for a New York veteran officer who received a late war or postwar brevet to General and later wanted a coat that reflected his honorary rank. My guess is that the owner was a New York colonel during the war who received an honorary brevet in May of 1865 or later, and wanted a uniform to wear in GAR parades showing off the fact that he was an honorary general who had served in the Union Army. The maker’s label inside the collar is “Hatfield & Sons / New-York,”. This firm existed from 1868 to 1881. The coat is fundamentally a CW regulation brigadier's coat, just made a few years later. The epaulets are no-doubt-about-it Civil War epaulets, which would be expected as wartime production insignia and accoutrements were in the inventory of military goods dealers for some time after 1865. A very nice example of a scarce CW rank insignia. If you are looking for a General's uniform and don't want to spend ten thousand or more ... this is a lot of visual bang for the buck ... $3,950.00

 

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14-08-20 ... Fine Early Wardate 1861 Pocket Size New Testament:  Exactly what most Christian soldiers carried off to war with them when Lincoln called for volunteers in the Spring of 1861.  Excellent condition overall.  Bears woman's name on flyleaf.  Perfect for display or careful use in reenacting ... $75.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-21 ... Union Soldier's Leather Gear & Bayonet: US buckle on belt with cap box.  M1861 socket bayonet in scabbard. Rifle Sling. Cartridge box with US plate on flap. A rig recently found just the way it was when the veteran put it away after his last parade. This rig shows clear evidence that Billy Yank continued to wear his gear at the reunions. Note the well done ancient reinforcement on the belt. The only modern repair is a small one inch long, thin leather patch I had helper Tom put on the back of the rifle sling near the hook end. The leather was weak there, now it's not. Aside from that necessary repair this rig is "as found". The cartridge box is very good and totally complete except for the tin liners which are gone as usual. The US box plate has a fine age patina. All straps and buckles are firmly in place. The cap box is solid but one loop is gone from the back and the other is hanging on by a thread. I will leave this for you to restore so I can keep the price low.   The other leather items are free from defects. They are solid and supple and show only expected age and use. The buckle is a nice arrow back example and shows that it was kept brighter for parade purposes.  The bayonet scabbard is the early pattern with two rivets and stitching as opposed to the later war 8 rivet examples.  The rifle sling is complete with both loop adjusters and is VG condition. A real rig that was brought home after the war. I just wish I knew who carried it.  I could squeeze more money out of this by selling each piece individually, but I'll leave it the way I found it and keep it priced extra fair ... $895.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-22 ... Full Flap Military Holster for the Colt Dragoon: Incredibly scarce military holster for the Colt Dragoon. Very solid, untouched, with great finish and good color. Superb condition that will clean to near mint. End plug in place, stitching firmly intact up and down the edge, belt loop secure with no tears and even the latch tab in place with no damage. Superb in all respects. Only very slight rubbing to the very edges, a little bit of crackling on the latch tab from flexing. This holster rates an “A+” in any grade book anywhere. Even the more common pattern 1860 army holsters would command four figures in this condition ... and this is for a dragoon! Untouched and unmessed with- never even had a whiff of leather dressing. A holster hard to find in any condition, and this one in a condition nearly impossible to improve upon.  The third model dragoon shown with it is a local find from my personal collection ... $1,950.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-23 ... Super Condition P-53 Enfield: An absolutely "Extra Fine" condition Enfield rifle musket with a Tower 1863 lock and sharp Birmingham Small Arms Trade cartouche on the buttstock. Lock shows strong remnants of case colors, very clear Crown, Tower and 1863 markings.  Extremely sharp edges to the wood around the raised lock platform, and on the offside as well, showing the gun very much as it came out of the crate. Both sights in place, both swivels, ramrod and bands. X 25 X 25 X Barrel proofs jump out at you; other inspector and subinspector markings are equally sharp. Barrel is likewise extra fine with 70% + original blue finish mixing with plum patina.   Excellent breech with unbattered nipple and smooth bolster showing color. A few small digs in the wood just below the top band, at left of breechplug tang, and outboard side of butt. Matching mellow patina to the brass, screw slots sharp.  This is a sharp gun and a super example of the most popular imported long arm in the Civil War, purchased, brought over here, and issued in large numbers by both sides. One of the better condition examples currently on the market ... $2,850.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-24A ... Import French Lefaucheux 12mm Pinfire Cavalry Revolver: The pinfire system seems a dangerous one in retrospect: a thin sliding pin poking up from a cartridge and extending beyond the protection of the cylinder wall. It would fire when the hammer pounded the pin into the cartridge. But any bump to the sliding pin would detonate the cartridge, so the user had to be careful. In the 1860s it was considered safe enough, and it worked pretty darn well. The system offered waterproof and resilient ammunition, was extremely popular in Europe and saw considerable use over here in the Civil War. The lanyard ring on this example and the 12mm bore are the key features of this cavalry model. The wood grip is excellent and has a tight fit to the metal the metal is an even silver-gray overall. Sight, ejector rod, and loading gate are all present. The front sight is a modern replacement in brass... very well executed. Mechanically perfect. Very clear Lefaucheux patent marks on forward frame. Belgian proofs on barrel, Liege,maker marks on the cylinder, and serial number 41940 on the bottom frame beneath the cylinder. The US government purchased at least 13,000 of these in recorded government expenditures, along with over two million cartridges. However tallying individual regimental ordnance records indicate that far more than 13,000 revolvers were imported. The imported guns came directly from Lefaucheux as well as from the Belgian licensees. They are known to have been issued to the 5th Illinois Cavalry, 2nd & 5th Kansas Cavalry, 6th Kentucky Cavalry, 8th Missouri, 1st Wisconsin and the 9th Missouri State Militia Cavalry regiments.  Bedford Forrest's Confederate cavalry likelwise had a few hundred of these.  A very solid representative example of the famed Lefaucheux Pinfire ... $975.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-24B ... Super Condition French Lefaucheux Revolver: Import French Lefaucheux 12mm Pinfire Cavalry Revolver: This one is the same pattern as the one listed above, but this is a French made example by Lefaucheux, and it is in NRA Fine++ condition. The barrel, cylinder and frame retains 70% or more original factory blue. The photos do not do the gun justice, but we don't have time to re-shoot them before this list goes out. Sight, ejector rod, and loading gate are all present. Mechanically perfect. Very clear Lefaucheux patent marks on forward frame.Serial number 20110 on the bottom frame beneath the cylinder is still nice and clean, as is the 84N under the cartridge loading gate. They are known to have been issued to the 5th Illinois Cavalry, 2nd & 5th Kansas Cavalry, 6th Kentucky Cavalry, 8th Missouri, 1st Wisconsin and the 9th Missouri State Militia Cavalry regiments. Bedford Forrest's Confederate cavalry likelwise had a few hundred of these. An excellent example of the famed Lefaucheux Pinfire with most of the factory blue. Very rare to find these with finish.... A great deal at ... $1,550.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-25 ... Regulation Civil War Cavalry Saber Belt in Buff Leather in Near Mint Condition: “If you want to have a good time, join the cavalry…” or so the saying went. They certainly knew how to uniform and equip themselves. This is the regulation issue saber belt for cavalry and includes not only the rectangular eagle saber belt plate and hasp with matching numbers, both saber slings, all the little tightening slides, but also the very hard to get shoulder cross belt in matching buff. This is the regulation cavalry belt, complete as issued! Plate is the regulation one-piece wreath variety eagle belt plate. Hasp and billets securing the D-rings and square rear loop are secured with stitching and rivets. Both saber slings are in place and solid. I will even explain to the buyer the secret to unfastening the studs on the slings without tearing the leather so that you can mount a saber on it if you choose. This is a truly superior piece in outstanding condition, showing a nice patina to the brass, a virtually no wear or handling on the leather other than a smidgen of storage dirt. The buckle and brass keeper bear matching bench numbers "776". Light artillery belts were different and had no provision for the shoulder belt, but I have seen plenty of photos of artillerymen wearing cavalry belts, so this could go into your gunner’s display or your cavalry display ... Top notch, and complete ... $1,975.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-26 ... Cavalry Trooper's Cartridge Boxes: First, A regulation carbine cartridge box complete with the drilled wooden block to hold 20 fixed cartridges. Box is complete with all straps and buckles and is nicely marked by J.I. Pittman the maker. There is a small spot of damage on the left side of the inner implement pouch as shown in the photo above, otherwise fine. A very nice example. Second, the largest size cavalry revolver cartridge box. For years we assumed the big boxes were for .44 caliber and the small boxes were for .36 caliber ... but current wisdom says they were issued indiscriminately between both calibers. Condition is excellent. Complete and solid. I remember forty years ago when old Turner Kirkland down at Dixie Gun Works had these available in any quantity you wanted. $4 for small $5 for large. He also had dated packs of Civil War artillery fuzes for a dollar each ... how many thousand packs do you want? I never thought I'd be one of the guys telling "in the old days" stories... but I guess I am now. At any rate ... Two very good examples of Union Army cavalry equipment priced fairly for the pair ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-27 ... US 1840 Pattern Light Artillery Saber and Scabbard: This was introduced as a sidearm for mounted enlistedmen in light artil­lery units: drivers, sergeants, etc. in the light artillery units, and for all enlistedmen in the horse artillery. It served from the Mexican War through the Civil War and beyond. However none were made after 1865 due to the huge number held in government stores. This example is the way we collectors like to find them: an attic find with nice subtle aged patina to the brass hilt and the scabbard mostly plum brown. There is one scabbard dent near the ring mounts. Has a nice steel grey blade with a few age spots. Also has a good leather grip with just some even wear and light flaking. The original wire is in place. Also present is the leather bumper/washer at the base of the blade that prevents the brass guard from banging into the scabbard throat. Nicely marked U.S. / CEW / 1864 on the obverse and AMES MFG CO./ CHICOPEE/ MASS. on the reverse. One of those sabers that really looks like it was put away 150 years ago and not touched. If you want to know what the gunners carried who galloped into battle to support Custer’s cavalry charges in the war, this is the saber ... fej / petr ... $795.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-28 ... Early Remington New Model Army Revolver: Very early production 1863 Remington. Low serial number 44,961 puts it in the first few months of production. Early two line barrel legend without New Model wording. Early cone style front sight is a carryover from the earlier Beals and Old 1861 model revolvers. NRA Good to Very Good condition. All original except for loading lever catch (the lever is original just the little catch under the barrel is replaced). The loading lever retention screw is replaced inconsequential. Also the cylinder pin (arbor) appears to be a proper replacement. Otherwise all original and mechanically fine. The metal is uniformly brown/black patina. Grips are VG and original. Faint cartouche on left grip. Small chip in left grip. The 44,000 serial range is extremely early for a New Model. The Beals and 1861 Patterns eat up numbers into the 30,000 range. This early gun certainly saw service fighting in the Civil War. Priced realistically at ... $850.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-29 ... Restored Remington New Model Army: I hesitate to guess what the earlier owner paid to have this Remington restored. Though all the major steel parts are original, it appears that all the internal parts, springs, and grips were replaced. This work was done by a gunsmith in the mid 20th century who stamped "A J 41" on the frame under the grip, and inside the top strap of the frame. Presumably these are the smith's initials and the 41st gun he upgraded. He reblued all the steel parts at that time as well. The gun was likely upgraded by someone who wanted to shoot it. The trigger return spring is slightly weak as is the hand spring ... but they do function. All the internal parts and springs appear to be custom made by hand. Either this was a labor of love or someone poured a whole lot of money into it. Great for display or reenacting. The Uberti replicas are $350 here is a dead real original for ... djj ... $535.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-30 ... Confederate Corn-Pone Cavalry Saber / Likely Froelich Cavalry Saber: A superb specimen of what most believe to be an early, or variant pattern Louis Froelich Kenansville, N.C. cavalry saber. Note the elongated quillon and smooth pommel cap. The flat branches on the guard are highly indicative of some Froelich products, especially his staff officer's swords. Wonderful original leather grip covering and single strand iron wire wrap. Truly outstanding. This one is housed in a European scabbard dated 1849. I believe the scabbard is French for their heavy cavalry saber. Condition on both pieces is excellent. Louis Froelich operated in Wilmington NC in late 1861 then moved to Kenansville NC in 1862. The arsenal was destroyed by US forces in 1863, but Froelich rebuilt and resumed operations in late 1863 and at least into 1864. A classic and rare pattern CSA cavalry saber ... $3,975.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-31 ... Two Pieces of Yankee Cavalry Gear that Saw Service: First is a nice, solid, regulation full flap holster for a Colt Navy revolver. Condition is VG or better. The finial backing has been reinforced inside the holster and the end plug has a bit of reinforcing thread added ...Long ago, otherwise untouched. Very nice. Second, scarce pattern carbine cartridge box that is not as wide as most we encounter. The inner dimensions of the box proper are 7.5 by 1.5 inches. It is solid and complete except for one roller buckle which has pulled loose --- but is still inside the box. I can have helper Tom reattach this for $15... or you can do it yourself for free. No block inside. Stenciled inside the flap "C / 11865" Meaning unknown. Front flap once sported a cartridge box plate. The leather thong that held it is inside the box, but the plate is long gone. Both of these pieces were really there... both showing obvious evidence of real wartime use. Holster is easily worth 300 to 350 box is worth easily 200 to 250 ... Priced very fairly for the two pieces at ... $495.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-32 ... Scabbard 01 ... .. Leather Scabbard for a WWI US Army Engineers Bolo Machete ... about 16 1/2" in total length. Brass caps on each end with a moderate curve to its design. Leather stamping on front side still visible - Silhouette Logo of a crown with an arm coming out of it holding a hammer ... text under it reads "LEGITIMUS" ... text above it reads "COLLINS & CO."... $49.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-33 ... Scabbard 02 ... .. WWII USMC 1945 Boyt scabbard for corpsman bolo knife. 3 1/2" x 12 1/4" in size. If you have the knife, here's your sheath  ... $49.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-34 ... Classic Civil War Enfield Rifle Musket w/ Sling: The quintessential Enfield as used by both Union and Confederate infantrymen, this one made by Robert Hughes. NRA “very good+” condition. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, and very handsome. Still affixed is a VG+ original US made rifle sling with both loop adjusters still in place.  Lock is clearly marked “1862 TOWER” and bears the CROWN stamp. The barrel bears the proper 25*25* stamping showing the gun is .577 caliber and as such there are 25 bullets to the pound. This 25*25* mark and the lesser seen 24*24* stamp are the proper ones for Enfields sent over for use during our Civil War. (24*24* indicates .58 caliber.)  Numerous British stock markings present as shown, by Robert Hughes of Birmingham. RH & crown twice and full oval cartouche on right side of butt stock. Also marked on barrel “RH”. . Small crack near lock screw on left stock flat. Owner’s name “JOHN KORWIN” is scratched into the butt stock. I cannot find an infantryman with that name in the rosters, but do find a late war cavalryman from New York. You can research further. A top notch example that you can be proud to display. The sling is worth $250 or more ... $1,595.00

 

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14-08-35 ... Hopkins & Allen XL No.4 ... .. Hopkins & Allen incorporated on June 15, 1868 by Charles A. Converse, Charles W. Allen, Horace Briggs, Samuel S. Hopkins and Charles W. Hopkins. The company was managed by the brothers Charles W. Hopkins, Henry H. Hopkins and Samuel S. Hopkins. This particular gun is the .38 caliber, Hopkins & Allen Pocket Revolver Model 1871 (XL No. 4), and was made in the 1880s. It has a 2 1/2" round barrel, and standard spur trigger. A perfect gun to display with Wild West Gambler items. Overall VG condition, 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Interestingly this XL No.4 has the additional 1879 patent marking on the frame Nice, clean functional, with very clear markings ... $450.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-36 ... A True Pair... But Not a Matched Pair of Percussion Pistols: A very handsome pair of large bore percussion pistols signed H. Nock on the locks.  Henry Nock was one of the foremost gun makers in England during the 18th century.  His name is stamped on the locks but he died in 1804 long before these pistols were made.  Nock's nephew and also his son in law continued on in the gun business separately and these pistols are likely the product of the Son in Law.  Made circa 1835 1840 era these are utilitarian grade large bore pistols of roughly 60 caliber.  I have labeled them gun A and gun B.  While virtually identical, gun A has a rounded grip area while gun B has a flat table on each side of the grip area.  Gun A has a replaced lock screw clearly seen in the picture above.  Both locks and hammers are signed and engraved identically.  Trigger guards identical.  Escutcheon side plates identical and both have two holes that I believe were used to mount these on a wall display.  Gun B has a fracture in the wood shown in the photo above.  Otherwise fine.  Gun A is free from damage.  Both have wooden ramrods.  Both are mechanically perfect.  Gun A has two barrel proofs crown over G and crown over V.  Gun B has three proofs crown over crossed scepters, crown over ?N, and crown over crossed scepters.  Here is a true pair of pistols that will look great on your wall and will not break the bank.  For the PAIR ... $995.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-37 ... 1836 Pattern Flintlock Pistol by Asa Waters: this is a super example of the last of the single shot martial US flintlock pistols. Made in .54 caliber, they were improvements on the 1826 pattern and produced by Asa Waters and Robert Johnson on contract to the US government between 1836 and 1844. They are a good looking pistol and were well liked - so much so that many were converted to percussion and saw service into the beginning of the Civil War.  Ours is a sharp example of those supplied by Waters, likely under his third contract of February 1840 for 15,000 pistols. Iron mounted with brass flash pan.  The metal is slightly worn with just a touch of gray and scattered small dark spots. Good US/JH/P barrel marks. . “A.Waters / Milbury, MS./1840”  lock plate marks with the small eagle's head above the name all remain nice and crisp.  Good brass pan. the wood is excellent with sharp edges and good fit to the metal, just one small indent forward of the lock that is not very noticeable. Very clear inspector's cartouche and initials on the off side.  Dished rear sight and blade front sight in place. Good mechanics, rammer assembly in place. This was the standard issue handgun during the Mexican War and could be found in saddle holsters of mounted troops all during the period. This would be a key weapon in a US arms collection and this is a sharp looking US flint pistol you will be hard-pressed to upgrade ... and just about to celebrate its 175th birthday. abej - parks ... $1,750.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-38 ... Battlefield recovered eagle breastplate: an excellent circular eagle shoulder belt plate found in the late 20th century with a metal detector. fine untouched age patina on the face and both iron wire loops intact on the back. These were once common now you might spend 100 hours or more searching for one with your metal detector ... $185.00 SOLD

 

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14-08-39 ... Very Nice Colt Special Model 1861 Contract Musket: While most contractors were instructed to manufacture M1861 Springfield pattern muskets, Colt and two other firms were allowed to make this "Special Model 1861" which is virtually identical to the Type-1 Model 1863 Springfield. It has rounded barrel bands secured by friction tightening screws. It has a straight ramrod, a flat bolster, and a serpentine hammer --- all features later found on the 1863 Springfields. This fine rifle-musket is in NRA "very good++" condition ... near fine. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect. All markings crisp and legible. Lock and barrel both dated 1864. The "4" on the barrel is worn but legible. Two crisp federal inspectors' cartouches are present on the left stock flat showing this was made under US Army contract. Excellent bore. Tight and solid. Much cheaper than we see at the large gun auctions. Very desirable with the Colt markings. The world's most collectible guns are Colts ... $2,350.00 SOLD

 

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