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15-05-141 ... Classic Wild West Sharps Carbine ... About as typical an Indian used rifle as one can imagine. I bought this out of an older collection in the west last year and was tickled to get it. It is a well worn, well used, weather beaten old war horse of a Model 1863 Sharps percussion carbine. Note that the butt plate has been gone since its' period of use with incredible wear to the stock edges. The barrel shows evidence of sight replacements during its period of use... and that these sights were then lost or discarded also during the period of use. Does not function. Very pitted and aged. Truly a RELIC of the wild west --- and wonderfully appealing for that reason. Indian used guns are distinctive in comparison to firearms used by Europeans and their descendants. No guns are more altered, abused, and poorly cared for than Indian guns. The Indians viewed the guns strictly as tools for killing... no more special than a spear or arrow. They did not have gun cleaning equipment, no gun racks in which to store the guns indoors, no gun oil, etc... etc... etc... This Sharps shows all the earmarks of Indian use. Cool Relic ... $795.00 - SOLD

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15-05-142 ... A. Waters US Model 1836 Conversion Pistol ... The last flintlock pistol made by the US govt and this one is a cone-in-barrel conversion to percussion. This is appropriate for display with US and Confederate soldier effects from the early days of the Civil War, or with Mexican War era weapons as well. Lock date 1839, also has full A. Waters firm marking. This gun has 2 nice cartouches, is 100% original including original rammer. The gun is overall VG condition. Owner carved an "X" in the left side of the grip ...one tiny tiny crack near escutcheon on back side of stock... all original and complete and mechanically perfect. Very handsome ... $765.00 - SOLD

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15-05-143 ... Civil War Import .69 Caliber Rifled Musket and Bayonet ... Patterned on the French 1842 infantry musket, but lacking French arsenal marks and having a bolster somewhat like the French 1857 dragoon rifle, this is likely a Belgian made commercial version of the French rifled musket, typical of the weapons gathered in from European arsenals and arms dealers by American agents of both sides in the early years of the war. Nice wood overall. The metal is brown with some light peppering. Long range rear sight, front sight, bayonet stud, all bands and swivels in place. The rod is a modern reproduction that will do until a period one comes available. With the gun is its correct bayonet. Maker and inspector numbers and initials present. Some light abrasion near the buttplate tang. Some light corrosion near the nipple from firing. A good early war long arm proper to display with US or CS effects. With the bayonet (worth 125 by itself) .... sw-dej ... ba-ajj ... $795.00

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15-05-144 ... Springfield Arsenal Labeled Wood Box for Gun Nipples: Round wood box with lid, about 2.5 inches in diameter and 1.5 inches high when closed. Green paper arsenal label mostly in place: the bottom portion reading “Steel Gun Nipples / Double Reverse” with the bottom partially pre-printed with “Springfield” and the screw number filled out in ink by hand. Part of the upper portion of the label, that was glued to the lower edge of the lid, is still there and reads “One-Fourth Gro[ss]” (three dozen nipples) A neat arsenal marked piece intended to ship spare parts to far away depots or troops in the field.  In the previous 40 years I've never seen one, then I found two this year.  The other one had a CW compass inside,  I kept it! Neat Springfield Armory/Arsenal relic and CW ditty box ... $135.00 - SOLD

 

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15-05-145 ... CDV of dapper infantry officer Jacob Lombard CDV: Full-standing Yankee line officer who fought in North Carolina. This dapper infantry officer holds his forage cap in front of him in folded hands, showing part of its infantry insignia, and wears a regulation officer’s frock coat with light blue trousers. A big set of straps mark his shoulders and he wears his foot officer’s sword high up on the carrying hook of his officer’s sword belt that sports a shoulder support strap. Silsbee, Case and Co., Boston, backmark. A nice shot, minor faint foxing spots to the left, not affecting the image.  A collector note on reverse in pencil identifies him as Jacob H. Lombard of the 44th Mass, and civilwardata confirms the identification with another photo of him taken in the same studio in a different pose. Jacob Hall Lombard was 25 years old and a clerk in Boston. He enlisted 5/26/62 and was commissioned the next day as a 2nd Lieutenant in Co. A 4th Battalion Mass. Infantry. This was a militia outfit called up for a thirty-day tour of duty, but given permission to recruit up to regimental strength and so was mustered out almost immediately. Recuiting then started for a nine-month outfit. Lombard then received a commission dating to 8/22/62 as Captain Co. C in the regiment which was then designated 44th Mass. Infantry. The regiment was sent to New Berne, NC., where it became part of Foster’s 18th Corps. The regiment lost its first men in action in October while on an expedition from Little Washington to Rawles Mill, Williamston and Tarboro. In December it went on the Goldsboro Expedition, losing 8 killed and 10 wounded at Whitehall. Lombard resigned his commission in January, 1863, and was discharged for disability. He died in 1875 ... dj - gracey ... $75.00 - SOLD

 

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15-05-146 ... Cutlery Handled Bowie Knife at the Ready ... Shades of Garibaldi! I don’t know who this well-turned out fellow is, but he looks a lot like one of the many expatriates and veterans of the wars in Italy who made their way over here to fight for the Union. In any case, he is loaded for bear. He leans on a musket with fixed bayonet, pistol in a full-flap military style holster on his belt, a sheathed saber bayonet, and prominent cutlery handled bowie shoved in his belt for good measure! The CDV has an Amherst, Mass., backmark and a tax stamp dated Jan 1865 showing that our “zouave” was here for the war. The fellow is most likely part of a visiting military delegation. The numbers of foreigners from western Europe who came to fight and observe and serve are legion. He wears a low crown kepi with European hunting horn insignia and European style battle shirt with chevrons high up on the sleeve, somewhat baggy trousers and short gaiters. That dashing mustache and goatee is a real statement of style! His musket is distinctive but I cannot recall which pattern it is. His belt accoutrements tell the story. He has a revolver in a full flap holster and a cutlery handle Bowie Knife both of which give him just the right Civil War flavor. A magnificent piece of CW photography on all fronts and one that is worthy of research. The answer will be in the Amherst or Boston newspapers. A great CDV ... $375.00 - SOLD

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15-05-147 ... CDV Of A Toledo, OH, Soldier 25th Ohio Regiment 95th? ... Two-thirds seated view of a soldier posed with his forage cap in hand showing the viewer a two-digit regimental number over a company letter. His coat at first seems a civilian garment, but the three eagle cuff buttons indicate he is wearing a high-grade commercial sack coat. Period pencil identification on reverse: "Mr. Henry D. Nelson / Toledo / Ohio" and there is a Denison, Toledo, photographer backmark. Several Henry Nelsons show up in the Ohio records, but none in the 25th Ohio, which seems to be the number on his cap. One of them is in the 95th OVI, which fits the second digit, but I can't quite convince myself the first number is not a "2." That soldier enlisted at age 36 in August, 1862, and served until October, 1863, when he died of disease at the regimental hospital in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. He served, however, in Company F, and the man's company letter appears more a C or G. It is possible the name on the reverse is the intended recipient of the card. In any case, this is a nice view of a Toledo soldier displaying a great forage cap ... zzbj ... $65.00 - SOLD

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15-05-148 ... Fine Sixth Plate Tintype Early War Officer: A fine pose of a Union volunteer circa 1861 posed in his frock coat with epaulets, and proudly displaying his Mexican War era militia officer's sword. Crumpled in his lap is his sword-belt. Excellent on all fronts. Housed in a fine full case. My gut says our man hails from New England. Great early CW image ... $350.00 - SOLD

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15-05-149 ... Civil War Surgical Tourniquet ... Fine large size surgical tourniquet complete with the classic 1860s woven red strap with white edge stripes. As shown, measured including the wrapped strap itself, it measures 3 inches high by 2.5 inches across the base. Marked on the top bar of the T-shaped tightening screw is the maker's name "STEVENS". 100% complete including the brass buckle with steel teeth. If you have a Civil War surgical kit that needs a tourniquet here is a dandy. Or it is perfect to display with a few loose surgical tools. Top drawer example ... $395.00 - SOLD

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15-05-150 ... Extremely Rare Army Version Gutta Percha Civil War Shaving Soap Dish ... We have all seen the wonderful US Navy versions of these hard rubber soap dishes, but few collectors have seen or even know of the existence of this incredibly rare Army Version. The motif --- A ferocious American Eagle, perched and holding a straight razor in one talon and a razor strop in the other. (What a wonderful piece of art!) Clenched in the raptor's beak is a banner with the marvelous double entendre aphorism "MORNING EXERCISE". The dish itself is 3.5" in diameter... Cast into the rubber around the mirror is the manufacturer information. "MANUFACTURED BY THE NOVELTY RUBBER CO. UNDER GOOYEAR'S PATENT MAY 6 1851. NEW BRUNSWICK NEW JERSEY". This is truly a great find and one of only four I have owned. It displays super but there is a chip out of the edge of the lid, and the circular mirror inside the lid is missing. I will leave it to you to get that replaced. To accurately stress the rarity of this personal item is difficult. I can say that I have owned many more Confederate Belt rigs than Union army soap dishes. I have owned many more Confederate uniform coats than Union Army Soap Dishes. In other words they are pretty damn scarce. About a hundred times rarer than the navy version. On Nov. 21st, 2008 one of these sold at Heritage Auction for $1,912.00 including the buyer's premium and that one had a cracked mirror!!! (You can verify this on their web page. Lot 57942 ) I sold a better condition example for $1295 a couple years ago. This one with a little damage ... $495.00 - SOLD

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15-05-151 ... Special Aide to Lincoln / African American Related / Signed CDV of Colonel Le Grand Bouton Cannon, Aide-de-Camp to General Wool, influential in the Union Defense Committee in 1861, the sheltering of escaped slaves at Fortress Monroe, the enlisting of black troops in the army, and internal army politics. Crisp vignetted bust view of a field-grade officer with flashy sideburns! Cannon was from New York and had served as a volunteer on General Wool’s staff before the Civil War. When most of Wool’s staff resigned and went south, Cannon and a few other prominent New Yorkers joined his staff as volunteers, Cannon acting a volunteer ADC to Wool from April 23 to August 28, 1861. During this period he took an active part in the Union Defense Committee of New York in corresponding with and aiding various northern governors, like the Governor of Illinois, who were trying to obtain arms, etc., and organize without adequate leadership from Washington.
Cannon was officially appointed Major and AADC on Wool’s staff August 28; and Colonel on Feb. 1, 1862. He accompanied Wool to Fortress Monroe, Virginia, which they preserved for the Union. Cannon was involved in formulating the “contraband” policy about escaped slaves who had sought protection at Fortress Monroe and was intimately involved in some of the army’s political infighting. His reminiscences published after the war include a number of first hand accounts of the Monitor and the Merrimac, time spent as a special aide to Lincoln, and experiences with Secretary Stanton, etc. Cannon resigned June 11, 1862, but rejoined Wool’s staff as a volunteer for a time thereafter, until Wool’s retirement in 1863. Cannon’s accounts are a real insider’s view of the doings at various army headquarters. He had been offered the military command of Norfolk, before resigning.
The card is presented to Lt. Col. Whipple, who is probably William Dennison Whipple, West Point class of 1847, who served until 1890, was both ADC and AAG at different points in his career, served on Gen. Hunter’s staff, the staff of General Thomas, and after the war as ADC to Sherman from 1873 to 1878: “Lt. Col. Whipple USA / Asst Adjt Genl / With regards / Le GB Cannon Col / USA & ADC.” Their staff duties had probably brought them into connection at some point, though Whipple was a New Yorker like Cannon.
A significant subject involved in some important early war doings ... $175.00

 

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15-05-152 ... General William F. Smith—He spoke his mind! Wonderful half-length seated view of the outspoken general in his major-general’s frock coat. Couple minor abrasions to card edge, otherwise excellent. “Baldy Smith” was West Point class of 1845, an officer of engineers until the Civil War, and Colonel of the 3rd Vermont in 1861 serving on the staff of General McDowell at Bull Run. He became a Brigadier General of Volunteers in 1861 and led a division of the 6th Corps on the Peninsula and the Maryland Campaign, and commanded the corps at Fredericksburg. Critical of Burnside and a supporter of McClellan, he was shunted aside in 1863 and sent west, where he ended up feuding with Rosecrans but earning some praise from Grant, and made Major General in 1864. Brought east to command the 18th Corps under Butler, he criticized both Butler and eventually Meade. Accusations that he could have acted more aggressively at Petersburg led to his removal from command in July, 1864. He left the army in 1867, turning to civil engineering and acting as president of a telegraph company and the NY Board of Police Commissioners until his death in 1903. My favorite quote of his was his judgment on Butler: “as helpless as a child on the field of battle and as visionary as an opium eater in council.” He cerrtainly knew how to craft a criticism ... $95.00

 

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15-05-153 ... Carrying Civilization Forward With Bowie And Bible - An Alamo Era Traveler's Cases Religious Set ... There were probably as many top hats as coonskin caps among those heading west in the 1830s. We often picture men heading off to the frontier dressed in buckskins and primitively equipped, but most saw themselves as bringing civilization to the frontier. They took their weapons and their religion with them. Here is a beautifully cased traveling set of the New Testament, Book of Common Prayer, and Proper Lessons for Morning and Evening Prayers, all printed in pocket size by the University Presiouss at Oxford in 1834. Bound in maroon leather and cased in a similarly colored, embossed two-piece carrying case. These were obviously made to be part of the effects of a properly equipped traveler or settler and would be just as much at home in the baggage of a southern dandy like William Barrett Travis heading to Texas, as a New England Bible thumper wishing to convert the western heathens. A truly high quality personal item in extra fine condition. Fast approaching 200 years of age and perfect to display with Battle of the Alamo era artifacts or Seminole War Florida era items. Top quality ... $375.00 - SOLD

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15-05-154 ... Outstanding Example of the Scarce St. Louis Union Army Canteen ... Top notch in all respects. Has full cover, full shoulder strap, stopper, and the original string holding the stopper to the top bracket. Has the distinctive tin spout indicating manufacture at St. Louis. Some evidence now indicates tin spout canteens may have been made in Cinti as well. (98% or all Union canteens have pewter spouts.) Super condition showing just light age and handling ... $485.00 - SOLD

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15-05-155 ... Mexican War Small Size 1839 Pattern Oval US Box Plate ... Much scarcer than the larger cartridge box plates, these small sized plates were meant for use on the smaller cartridge boxes for carbines and rifles starting in 1839, and for pistols and pistol-carbine boxes as they were introduced. Measuring 2.75" by 1.65", this one shows a thin lead fill, even patina on the front with some traces of gilt in the recessed areas next to the letters and border. Both wire loops are intact and each shows a clip in the top, this done to facilitate folding them like prongs when attached to the flap of a cartridge box. These plates were manufactured up to 1861, but the thin letter style here dates it closer to the Mexican War era. About a hundred times rarer than a standard size box plate but priced only marginally higher ... $325.00 - SOLD

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15-05-156 ... Mexican War Dated Pocket Bible ... Nice condition, red leather bound 1847 pocket bible containing the Old and New Testament with gilt lettering. The name "E.J. Grannis" in old period pencil inside. One side of the cover extends in a tab that slips into a flat loop to keep the book tightly closed when in the pocket. I see quite a few Civil War dated pocket bibles, but not many from the era of the Mexican War. Published in Hartford. Solid condition though a little looseness of the binding on the spine. A nice addition to an officer's kit of the period ... $135.00 - SOLD

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15-05-157 ... Top Condition Union Army Cartridge Box ... An excellent and complete example of the 1864 pattern Union Army regulation 58 caliber infantry cartridge box. Leather finish is excellent. Markings are excellent and include "NECE" maker's cartouche and Laidley inspector's cartouche on the inner flap. All buckles and straps are firmly in place. Both tin liners are still present inside the box. The only small warts are two tiny pair of pin-holes at the top and bottom of the embossed US on the front flap where years ago, someone apparently attached an insignia to it with tiny wires that passed through the front cover. These pin pricks are negligible ... mentioned only for accuracy's sake. Super example ... $395.00 - SOLD

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15-05-158 ... 1853/54 Dated Sighted Harpers Ferry Model 1842 ... When the 1855 series of rifled and sighted arms was introduced there was a rush to retrofit existing arms and bring them up to current standards. Here is an 1842 musket made at the quintessential southern armory, Harpers Ferry, brought up to snuff by rifling the bore and adding a long-range rear sight. This gun was later bored out and no longer retains rifling. Very clear VP/eagle proofs on the barrel, lockplate date of 1853 and barrel date of 1854 on the tang, which is totally correct for rifled 42s. When the muskets were disassembled for retrofitting no attempt was made to retain matching locks and barrels. The parts are totally interchangeable and the arsenals mixed and matched them. I once owned a rifled and sighted Harpers Ferry with a Wm. Glaze SC barrel on it. Wood is good, cleaned many years ago producing a lighter tone, but not overly rounding its edges. Metal is silver/gray with some scattered purplish brown areas. Sights, bands, swivels and rod in place. Markings on the rear of the lockplate are sharp, the eagle and US forward of the hammer is rubbed on the right. Good nipple, not battered down. Some Roman numerals scratched on the buttplate. A good '42 with nice southern associations ... $1,195.00 - SOLD

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15-05-159 ... Major General Stephen Hurlbut ... A figure seldom encountered in "from life" photographs... Vignette CDV bust shot of Hurlbut in his major general's frock coat, top set of buttons grouped by threes is visible and the forward star on his shoulder strap. Barr and Young photographer mark with an 1863 copyright. This is from the same album as the Grant images in my last list. The condition is so-so, but the album came from one of Barr and Young's cameramen (see my last list for one of his inscribed cards.) This has some foxing and spots, Hurlbut's name in period ink (by that cameraman) and paper adhesions to the reverse. Hurlbut was a South Carolinian by birth who had moved to Illinois and became a Republican politician. Lincoln made him a brigadier general in June, 1861, and a major general in September, 1862. A division commander at Shiloh and Corinth, commander of the garrison at Memphis, and posted to command the Department of the Gulf in 1864. He was a competent commander, who (in Warner's words,) "exercised every opportunity to line his own pockets." He was honorably mustered out in 1865, and resumed his life in politics. He was active in the G.A.R., and served as Minister to Columbia,... retaining his ne'er do well persona with charges of drunkenness and corruption in office. Same then as it is today.... A very sharp from-life view ... $95.00

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15-05-160 ... Maj. Gen. McPherson CDV ... A very crisp from-life view (not a later printing or copy) of James Birdseye McPherson the most senior Union general killed in action during the war. From the same album as the Hurlbut and same album as Grant and his Father in last week's list... the photo taken by Barr and Young with an 1863 copyright. Graduating first in his West Point Class of 1853, McPherson rose quickly from a 1st Lt of Engineers at the beginning of the war to Major General and division commander by October, 1862. Chief Engineer to Grant at Fort Henry, Donelson, Shiloh and Corinth. In January, 1863, he was placed in command of the 17th Corps and earned praise from Grant and Sherman in the Vicksburg Campaign and won a promotion to Brigadier General in the regular army. In March, 1864, he was given command of Sherman's old Army of the Tennessee, which he led in the fighting against Johnston in Georgia. He was killed in action in front of Atlanta in July, 1864, and was widely mourned by both his officers and men, and by Sherman himself. Another image from the same album kept by a Barr and Young cameraman. Very crisp and detailed image with good tones. Very minor foxing spots, one small rub on the back edge of McPherson's collar. Printed caption and copyright at bottom. The reverse has some stains and adhesions, but shows the photographer's backmark. A superior view taken and printed while McPherson was still making his reputation, from an album with an interesting provenance. McPherson was a local hero. He lived an hour's drive from here in Toledo. His small white clap board house still stands today in his home town of Clyde, Ohio. I've driven by it numerous times. A fine scarce CW photo ... $165.00 - SOLD

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15-05-161 ... HE RAISED THE FLAG AT VICKSBURG . . . WAS FRIENDS WITH MCPHERSON ... WAS GIVEN A HIGH GRADE COLT BY ROSECRANS ... WAS A THRILL SEEKER... WORLD TRAVELER ... SOLDIER FOR THREE NATIONS ... WAS AN ACCOMPLISHED CONFIDENCE MAN WHO LIVED THE LIFE OF A MILLIONAIRE ... AND HE RAN AN ARKANSAS PRISON AS A CONVICT... MEET COLONEL COOLBAUGH OF MCPHERSON'S STAFF ... One of the rarest and most interesting Civil War photos I have owned. In the 40+ years I have collected CW photos I have never seen another image of this high ranking officer offered for sale. I have found few men with a more interesting story in which it is tough to untangle fact from fiction than Colonel George Nyse Coolbaugh. Here is striking image of one interesting character! Three-quarter length standing view of a bearded officer in frock coat with sword, sash and belt. Field grade frock with the tip of his "full-bird Colonel" strap showing. Identified in period ink at bottom as "Col. Coolbaugh – 1863/ McPhersons staff" in the same hand as others from this album kept by a photographer employed by Barr and Young. On the reverse is another period ink inscription in the same hand reading "Col. Coolbaugh a Mexican Col., now in the U.S.A." and below that in pencil, "now a general in the Mexican Army."

George Nyse Coolbaugh was brother of a prominent Chicago banker who committed suicide in 1877, some said largely out of shame at George's actions. George was supposed to have been in the British army during the Indian Mutiny, taking part in the storming of Delhi, and receiving a resolution of regret at his departure by his superior officers when he left the service. However, he had such a reputation as a confidence man after the war that it is difficult to discover the truth of his biography. He apparently believed in living large. He went to Mexico after his British adventures, joined the Mexican army of Juarez and then came north on Mexican government business in 1862, with a pocket full of gold. He definitely had some railroad experience, being described as a General Railroad Freight Agent, and was made an acting aide on McPherson's staff in 1862 when McPherson was made superintendent of railways in West Tennessee. His expertise in orchestrating the transportation of men and supplies must have come in handy, for he remained with McPherson and the two became fast friends. At the surrender of Vicksburg in 1863 Coolbaugh was one of two officers sent by McPherson to unfurl the 17th Army Corps Headquarters garrison flag from the courthouse. One regimental history recorded it as follows: "When all arms had thus been stacked, General McPherson attended simply by his division generals and staff rode into the city. He proceeded at once to the courthouse where Colonel Coolbaugh and Lieutenant Colonel Strong ascended to the cupola, and, at half-past eleven, displayed thence the "Stars and Stripes," greeting them with three cheers which were responded to by the officers below, and then all joined in singing, "The Battle Cry of Freedom." [Hist of 7th RI] Coolbaugh's railroad expertise came in handy after the taking of the city as well. A Harpers Weekly illustration of the period shows five locomotives built by Union soldiers in Vicksburg under Coolbaugh's supervision.

Coolbaugh, though, was equally adept at lining his own pockets (as was General Hurlbut, whose photograph was also found in this archive.) While he was in Corinth, Governor Sprague of Rhode Island showed up looking to buy cotton and Coolbaugh fronted $20,000 to buy it at 7 to 9 cents a pound in gold, which gave them a good mark-up since it sold at 15 cents a pound in greenbacks. It was a deft maneuver and Coolbaugh was made an honorary Lieutenant Colonel without pay. He believed in spreading good fortune, however, and later presented McPherson a Tiffany sword valued at $1500 and Grant a set of saddle mountings worth $2500. By September, 1863, however, his actions seem to have caught up with him. Assistant Adjutant-General Bowers, a close friend of Major Rawlings on Grant's staff, did not like him and his shenanigans jeopardized McPherson's promotion to brigadier general in the regular army. Coolbaugh determined to return to Mexico and was given a good send off, but stopped in St. Louis and there started recruiting for the Mexican army, a short-lived project since the Mexican government of Maximilian was sympathetic to the Confederacy. He did, however, meet and marry one Jennie Williams in that city, supposedly a respectable woman at the time, but who was said later to operate a "bagnio" (i.e. brothel) in Chicago. In the meantime, they headed to New York, Coolbaugh in a Mexican general's uniform. Billing himself as "Major General Coolbaugh of the Mexican Army," he appeared in New York City in March, 1865, and took rooms with a woman "his wife, or a lady who passed for his wife," at the Courtlandt Street House and represented himself as a very wealthy representative of the Mexican government looking for personal investment opportunities. One of his triumphs was to host a dinner party that included the Mayor and ran up a sizeable bill that Coolbaugh examined and declared was not high enough, since it would be paid by the Mexican Government. He represented that not only was he very wealthy, but his wife was from a rich family as well, and that he had a prosperous farm in New Jersey. Needless to say, he was never quite ready to draw out the gold he said was on deposit in the local bank and managed to borrow some $537.87 from the hotel proprietor before skipping town, and eventually being arrested in St. Louis and brought back to New York for trial in 1866. His penchant for living large was exhibited again in 1873. Temporarily postmaster in Clarksville, Arkansas, he was found guilty of purloining one dollar from a letter, he was sentenced to a year in prison, but denounced the judge and jury and demanded the stiffest sentence if he was guilty. The judge obliged and sentenced him to seventeen years. The prison at Little Rock, however, was privately controlled by a man named Hodges, who eventually made Coolbaugh the prison's business manager, allowing him to live outside the prison and wear civilian clothes. He quickly became known as one of the best dressed men in town driving "the most sumptuously accoutered buggy in the place." Appeals for a pardon from Grant, however, went unanswered. Of some note in terms of current day connections ... Coolbaugh's ultra high-grade, Gustave Young engraved, presentation Colt revolver was sold at Bonham's a few years back. The gun was presented to him by Gen. Rosecrans. Another mystery to solve. Bonhams had a pile of research on him. The one tid-bit Bonham's shared in their description was that family tradition said he died at the hands of Confederate sympathizers in revenge for his actions aiding the Union. As they say, this is an image worthy of further research! My favorite item on this list! Who owns his revolver???? ... $1,250.00

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15-05-162 ... Early War Union Army Cartridge Box ... The classic 1861 pattern infantry cartridge box for .58 caliber rifle muskets. This is the quintessential Civil War box for early-war and mid-war soldiers. Designed to be carried either on a waist belt or shoulder sling, the loops are secured with rivets and stitching and the buckles are in place on the bottom of the box for the shoulder sling. The latch tab is in place, secured by a single straight line of stitching with no rivet, a distinguishing characteristic of this pattern. The oval brass US cartridge box plate, used to keep the flap down when unlatched, is in place, as are the two interior tin magazines, used to keep the paper cartridges intact until needed by the soldier. The number 26 is stamped into the outer flap. Some overall pebbling to the finish. The plate polished some time ago, now beginning to tone down. Inner flap intact and the implement pouch on the face of the box with its smaller cover and latch tab are in place as well. A good solid example of basic item in a Civil War or US martial arms collection ... $450.00 - SOLD

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15-05-163 and 15-05-164 ... Joslyn .44 Cal. Cavalry Revolver with ULTRA RARE Holster I purchased these from the family descendants in Wisconsin. This holster is much rarer than the pistol, and a Joslyn is not a common revolver by any means - only about 3,000 were made in 1861 and 1862. This one bears serial number 189. The holster is adorned or reinforced along the edge of the cover flap with substantial brass rivets. I do not know if the holster was made with the rivets or if they were added by the soldier. My feeling is that they were put on at the factory or arsenal. I owned one Joslyn holster earlier last year that bore no such rivets, but this example appears to have been made with the rivets. There is wear on the leather, a few rivets are missing, the latch tab is gone, and there is some seam separation. The revolver is overall good to VG with two solder repairs where the back strap meets the frame and also where the inside grip strap meets the frame … the result of some nit-wit using the butt as a hammer and cracking these spots which the family then solder repaired. See photos which show the repair. Has clear Joslyn maker and patent markings, low serial number (189), smooth metal. Blued finish gone except for hints in protected areas. Some darker color near the muzzle, mostly a neutral dull silver, but cylinder shows some blue with a drag line at the rear. Checkering on grips is very good, showing wear but not worn excessively. The inboard grip, however, has a major crack that needs fixing and some chipping at the base showing where the nit-wit used it to pound something down.  The holster is a military configuration and fits the revolver perfectly, and it has been with the Joslyn since the war. No toe plug, as is frequently the case on any CW holster. Minor abrasion and finish loss. A scarce set. It needs a tune-up mechanically. The cylinder will rotate when the hammer is cocked but the hammer will not stay on full cock. I will leave this project to you. This Joslyn and holster were definitely carried together in the Civil War. Cavalry? Navy? ... $2,450.00 - SOLD

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15-05-165 ... Model 1873 Winchester Lever Action Rifle, .38 Caliber, Made in 1880 ... A very appealing and handsome example of The Gun that Won The West. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, good bore, great wood, and sharp markings. The rear sight is not the factory Winchester sight. NRA "very good" ++ condition. Totally honest. This rifle was manufactured in 1880 and bears serial number 61916. At the time Jimmy Stewart made the famous movie this gun was only 70 years old. The movie was made in 1950 and the rifle is now 135 years old. The cowboys are gone, the great movie stars are gone, the old guns live on. This round barrel '73 is a tight and honest example with much appeal. This is about as affordable an old cowboy gun as you can hope to find. I pulled the movie-still off the internet showing Jimmy Stewart and Millard Mitchell each holding a '73. I think it makes a great illustration of the rifle's use. Compared to prices of modern guns and replicas of antiques, this offering is a great value for the money ... $1,295.00 - SOLD

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15-05-166 ... English Life Saving Medal & Box ... About the size of a half dollar. Bears recipient's name and date of 1927. I thought it was neat. I'll let you do the research ... $49.00 - SOLD

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15-05-167 ... Ohio Marked Cartridge Box ... Regulation mid-war Union army infantry cartridge box with original US oval plate on the front flap and stamped "OHIO" below the plate. Worn and dry but overall solid and displayable. Some crackling in the leather finish. Latch tab broken. No tin liners, otherwise OK. Quite scarce with the OHIO mark on the front flap. This box was really there ... not an army surplus item. Priced just a smidgen more than the box plate is worth by itself ... $289.00 - SOLD

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15-05-168 ... Smith Carbine by the Massachussetts Arms Company ... Smiths were made by three different manufacturers. Here's one made by the Massachusetts Arms Company and so marked on the left of the receiver forward of the Poultney and Trimble agent markings. This is a decent gun with thin blue turning brown on the barrel, barrel band, and latch. Both sights in place, though the front sight blade has been replaced. Matching serial numbers 17364. Fairly tight breech, receiver a light steel gray with some gray spotting, some faded blue turned brown on the band at the wrist. Wood is good, dark, no cartouches visible. Slight chip at upper rear of forend, right side. Decent bore. Mechanically very good. A tight solid Smith carbine for your cavalry display ... abbe ... $1,395.00 - SOLD

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15-05-169 ...Extra Fine Condition Brass Mounted 1852 Sharps Slant Breech Carbine ... A very fine condition and very scarce Sharps in strong condition. About 5,000 of this 1852 slant-breech pattern were made for Sharps by Robbins and Lawrence in Windsor, Vt., from 1855 to 1857. They saw service on the western frontier and in the early days of the Civil War. Brass mounted with a sling ring and long side bar. Fine wood, wonderful tones, with just tiny handling marks. Nice tight fit to the metal fore and aft. Correct Sharps 1852 patent stamp on the lock, Sharps Rifle manufacturing stamp on the barrel, and Sharps 1848 patent stamp on the tang, along with serial number 7269. Markings are sharp. Barrel has most of the wonderful original blue intact which is turning an attractive plum color. Both sights in place. Receiver shows some mottled gray and darker gray from dissipated case colors mixed with some brown,... hammer with more scattered surface brown on the offside. Mechanism good, brass an even light, but not bright, tone. No inspector marks or cartouches - very few were taken in by the US army at this early date. This is a classy gun and one of the prettiest of the carbines out there. I don't think you'll find another '52 Sharps this nice at your next gun show ... $5,750.00 - SOLD

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15-05-170 ... Mexican War Dated Harpers Ferry '42 Musket - A Real veteran ... 1846 and 1851 dated 1842 pattern .69 Caliber musket.  The last of the regulation .69 caliber US infantry arms and the first of the issue percussion long arms. Attic condition, brown overall, no crustiness to the metal, just patina, mostly smooth   As expected there is some roughness around the nipple from firing.   HARPERS/ FERRY/ 1851 a tad light but readable on the lock behind the hammer, the eagle worn but present forward.  Two light cracks coming off the rear of lock platform, but very short and the wood is tight and has very good edges.  Some abrasions and handling dings, particularly opposite the lock, but nothing horrible.  Visible 1846 barrel date. Clear VP/ eagle and Harpers Ferry barrel inspector markings at breech.  Though the lock and barrel dates are years apart, the identical patina on the metal shows that the marriage of parts took place at the arsenal before the war, and that the gun went through the war as we see it here today.   Handling dings on the offside, a regimental or company and rack number on top of buttstock, two sets of initials cut in one side and one set scratched in on the other.  Bayonet stud, bands, springs and rod in place.  A very real veteran from the southern arsenal that certainly saw use.   These Harpers Ferry examples are much more desirable than their cousins made at Springfield up in Massachusetts. The fact that the HF guns were made in Virginia is a lot more interesting and gives those pieces a good southern flavor ... $950.00

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15-05-171 ... The “Peterson-75” Civil War Officer’s Sword 14-10-22 ... Nicknamed from its listing in Harold Peterson’s famous book, The American Sword, is this pattern of non-regulation officer’s sword that was popular for field use because of its metal scabbard. These were German made but patterned on the British 1822 pattern sword and incorporated a US eagle and national motto worked into the steel guard, along with several different styles of blade etching.  Ours is clearly marked by Walscheid   Solingen on one side of the ricasso, and on the other with an inset stamped brass disk reading “proved.” The hilt is mounted in steel with a grooved round pommel and slotted knuckle guard that leads to the counter guard with eagle and E PLURIBUS UNUM in ribband motif and curled quillon. The grip is rayskin with triple wire (thin, coiled, thin), back strap, and ferrule at the base.

The blade is single edged, spear point with substantial back edge, single fuller running about 2/3 of the blade, no nicks, silvery-gray with grayer dark areas, but very legible etching: and spread winged eagle with ribband and motto on one side and a large cross-hatched US on the other, both surrounded with profuse floral motifs. The scabbard is equally nice, both carrying rings, drag and throat in place, mellow aged color a smoky pewter with some shades of purple and blue. Very minor wear to the rayskin of the grip. A very nice sword. Typical of those carried in the field by officers who did not want to explain to a presentation committee how their costly gift got banged up in the fighting or be troubled by a leather scabbard broken in action while they were brandishing the sword to keep the men in line. A most affordable CW officer's sword ... $595.00

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15-05-172 ... 69 Caliber Musket Worm ... Correct for any of the 69 caliber muskets but likely for the m1816 ... $25.00 - SOLD

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15-05-173 ... Elongated 58 Caliber Musket Worm ... Much longer than most. I don't recall which gun it is for... will leave that research for you. A scarcer pattern for sure ... $45.00 - SOLD

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15-05-174 ... 58 Caliber Screw Style Ball Puller ... Standard Springfield screw style .58 caliber ball puller as issued with the 1855 through 1863 style Springfields ... $25.00 - SOLD

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15-05-175 ... Civil War Musket Worm ... Worm style ball puller for .577 and .58 caliber rifle muskets. This one has a cylindrical base. My memory (yes the old flawed one) tells me this is the Enfield pattern... ???... It is proper for any rifle or musket 56 to 58 caliber ... $25.00 - SOLD

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15-05-176 ... Very Scarce Early US Army Gun Tool / Ball Puller or Worm for Hall Rifle ... Just a hair under 3 inches overall length and stamped US on the shank. Has cork screw style worm. I believe these are Hall Rifle tools but may also be proper the for M1841 Mississippi Rifle. Have 2 priced each at ... $175.00 each - SOLD

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15-05-177 ... M1841 Mississippi Rifle and M1842 US Musket Tool ... The combination screw driver / nipple wrench tool issued to the soldiers for maintenance and repair. I have only four of these early 1841-1842 tools with the closed end nipple wrench. Priced well below my competition at ... $50.00 each - SOLD

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15-04-178 ... A lot of TEN Original Indian War Large Size Eagle Coat Buttons. A few years ago at an eastern Pennsylvania auction I bought a couple large bags full of these early Indian Fighters’ buttons and then I put them aside and forgot about them. I just stumbled across them again .... So here is a great opportunity.... ten original buttons for $25.00 These can be mailed inexpensively in a padded envelope. ... $25.00 for 10

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15-04-179 ... Friction Primer Tin [Tin not for sale] and Percussion Caps ... I just purchased this neat old relic and am offering the percussion caps inside the tin in this offering. This very scarce tin came just as you see it, filled with percussion caps for muskets. The tin itself is the arsenal tin used to hold artillery friction primers. These are darned hard to find! I can only think of one instance where I found one still in a primer pouch! The tin has a hinged cover with small latch and embossed top reading: “100 FRICTION PRIMERS” in an arc over an ordnance insignia, and “FRANKFORD ARSENAL” on either side. I don’t know who put the percussion caps in the tin, it was certainly a handy storage idea, but since they do not belong together, I am splitting up the lot.

In each package of ten cartridges the soldier got 12 caps. While the supply lasts I will sell the percussion caps ...
One Dozen ... ... ... $15
Two Dozen ... ... ... $25
Five dozen ... ... ... $50

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15-04-180 ... These buttons were patented in 1862 by Abel Putnam and made with a long spring shank and were designed to go through the grommets on issue rubber blankets so the sides could be connect­ed and the whole thing worn as a poncho in rainy weather.The face is a standard Union Army eagle button. The back is a spring hook fashioned from double spring steel wire. I have very few priced each at ... $45.00

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