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16-08-01 ...Pair of Ivory Gripped Colt Single Action Navy Conversion Cowboy Revolvers w/ Ranch Marking of  Rocking “Y” ... A pair of 38 caliber 1851 navy revolvers produced using the Richards-Mason conversion process and parts at the Colt factory along with left over M1851 parts. These guns were made as metallic cartridge guns, and are in their own serial range of 1 to 3800.   Only 3800 of these guns were produced in total in the early to mid 1870s.  Our pair is closely numbered,  2457 and 2641.  Each also bears a suffix “1” under the serial stampings.  My guess is that since the guns both have ivory grips the Colt employee intended to stamp the standard capital letter “I” after the numbers to indicate Ivory, but instead mistakenly grabbed the numeral “1” die.    I’ve seen plenty of Colts with transcribed serials on one or more parts.  I’ve seen upside down US stamps on single actions.  Mistaking a “1” for an “I” would be no stretch of the imagination. We just call them Monday morning guns.  In any event, the guns are in near identical Very Good condition and retain much of their original factory nickel finish.  Barrel lengths are 5 inches. Interestingly 2641 has the loading lever cut-out groove in the barrel lug from the old percussion style while 2457 does not.  Each is mechanically perfect.  2457 has a period repair to the ejector lever.  2641 has an incised “rocking Y” brand design on the right grip.  2457 has the right grip marking intentionally obliterated, it too appears to have been the rocking Y.  Searching the internet I find current ranches and a horse transport company listed as “Rocking Y Ranch”, and the Rocking Y is a known old time cattle  brand. I even found an internet record of an antique Rocking Y branding iron being sold on some site called etsy.   However, I do not yet know the location or history of the ranch where these Colt’s were used.  This pair of guns has been kind of famous in this neck of the woods.  They were turned up sixty or more years ago by one of the founders of the Michigan Antique Arms Collectors… Chet Parker, long deceased.  Chet sold them to another member of the club in the 1960s.  That fellow passed away and this year his family gave the guns to one of the club directors to sell for them, and I bought them at the last meeting.  A really appealing pair of old time Colt cowboy revolvers that can be researched much further. I think they're great.  Pair  $4,500.00 SOLD

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16-08-03 ...US ISSUE CUP AND PLATE ...A nice as-issued example of the standard US Civil War mess cup and plate. This is the standard Federal style cup and plate. Simple tinned iron construction. The plate is stamped out with a simple rolled edge and the cup is made with an upper rolled edge and clenched seams down the back and around the base, its handle secured with wires looping over the top edge and a rivet at the bottom to keep it on even if over heated on a campfire. Both pieces have lots of the original tinning left and show a dull gray with just a few spots of iron showing through. A nice set of regulation mess gear. I paid nearly this much for the pleasure of being able to offer them. $425.00 SOLD

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16-08-04 ...US ISSUE CUP SHOWING FIELD USE ...Here’s a second issue cup, this one showing great field use with original tin showing over the iron, but with large black, charred areas from being held over a campfire along with a bayonet point puncture in the handle (note the bottom angle of the hole from the triangular blade) to hold it out over the fire. I like mint material, but there is always something special about real field modifications made by soldiers to issue gear. This one sings Civil War field use. $285.00 SOLD

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16-08-05 ...RICHARDS PATENT MESS SET ...Army recruits were eager for any invention that promised to make life in the army easier. A number of combination mess tools were marketed with the promise they would be harder to lose, easier to carry, and simpler to find in the recesses of a haversack. The Richards patent is one of the earliest and most sturdy. The spoon and fork are stamped from one piece of steel, as is the knife, and flanges in the handles make them easy to interlock and store together. Both pieces are marked “Richards / Patent July 23, 1861” Good condition with mixed gray and brown age spotting. Very clear maker markings. This would go great with any of the issue mess gear shown above as part of a camp display. $435.00 SOLD

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16-08-06 ...SMALL EAGLE ARMS REVOLVER ...These cup-primed front loading pocket revolvers were made by the Eagle Arms Company in New York for Plant’s manufacturing Company of New Haven.  Six shot, .30 caliber, these were a down-sized version of the Plant 3rd Model Army.  Brass frame with some faint traces of its original silver, now showing a nice muted age patina. Ejector rod in place. Barrel marked with the Eagle Arms Company stamp and the cylinder with clear 1857 and 1863 patent dates. Both barrel and cylinder show lots of original blue turned plum brown with just some gray on the edges of the octagonal barrel. Nice, deep, rich brown tones to the grips, which are excellent-plus. Serial number 3545, which places it fairly early in the manufacturing run of some 20,000.   A very nice example. 100% original and complete. Mechanically perfect.  Just over six inches long overall.  Much nicer than most we see   $550.00 SOLD

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16-08-07 ...REGULATION UNION ARMY INFANTRY OVERCOAT ...Regulation US overcoat for foot troops. Sky blue wool kersey with a standing collar and attached cape. Single breasted coat with five large eagle buttons; elbow length cape with six small eagle buttons- all per regulation. The adjusting belt on the rear has had a state button substituted at some point for the general service eagle button. I have left it as found. Standard regulation loose-weave, blanket style lining. Unhemmed bottom to coat. Full length cuffs in place. Right sleeve lining bears size number “3”. Left sleeve lining bears faint Cowles Patent moth proofing stamping. Cape and coat show some dirt and staining from use, which for me is something cool. A couple of scattered moth holes on the back of the cape and lower left shoulder, otherwise a very good example in solid shape, showing good color and just enough wear. Very appealing. These have always been scarce items. $3,750.00 SOLD

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16-08-08 ...1862 DATED TOWER ENFIELD ...A standard pattern 1853 Enfield Rifle Musket.  The most popular of the imported rifles and used by both sides in the war.  Sharp “1862/ Tower” marked lockplate forward of the hammer with crown to the rear.  Both sights in place, including the long range rear sight, along with all bands, correct rod and swivels.  Mechanically perfect.  A little salt-and-pepper corrosion near the nipple from firing, generally smooth metal overall, just a little crustiness on the rear sight flat, with a nice original finish turned plum brown and partly black.  Bore has rifling but is dark.  The wood has good edges the surface and has been hand rubbed, giving it a deep, warm brown tone… like a well loved dining table.  The brass has a medium patina. Standard “25-25” proof marks on the left breech. A short, tight crack is just forward of the upper screw on the offside. This is a very nice looking example of a standard Civil War longarm that is a key piece in any collection.  Totally appropriate in a Confederate display without costing five figures.  $1,295.00 SOLD

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16-08-09 ...Nearly New Condition Aetna 22 Caliber Pocket Revolver: ...Made around 1870s or 1880s...  a perfect little item for Wild West gambler's display.  Retains nearly all the lustrous factory blue and the brass has an absolutely PERFECT undisturbed century old patina.  I saw it at our last OGCA show and had to have it.  Superb condition.  $465.00 SOLD

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16-08-11 ...Confederate Tin Drum Canteen ...Classic Johnny Reb tin canteen measuring 6 ¼ inches in diameter.  Standard folded and soldered construction.  Looking closely reveals that long ago there was a name painted on the face.  Faintly visible is a ghost image of a first name and Abrams and some other data.  Likely the name of the rebel owner or perhaps a yank who captured it.  Maybe some enhancement photoshop work on your computer might make the ghost more visible.  Great rebel canteen…  $795.00 SOLD

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16-08-12 ...Superb Pair of 300 Year Old Flintlock Conversion to Percussion Pistols by PHILIPPE DE SELIER, Liege and Paris, ca. 1700-1720. ... Fresh to the market.  These were brought into my shop by the 70+ year old son of the man who bought them way back in the “old days”.   They have been resting in a china cabinet here in Toledo since before most of us were born.  Nice large size… 19 inches overall length with 12.3 inch barrels.  The 62 cal. steel barrels have three maker's cartouches “PS”and crown.  Barrels are nicely swamped and have inset elongated low profile brass blade front sights.   Locks are maker signed 'PHILIPPE DE SELIER' around the bottom of the bolsters (where the pans used to be).    I find several listings for Philippe De Selier aka Philippe Selier, aka Phillipe de Sellier… mainly in antique European museum catalogs.  A German catalog lists him as working in Paris and Liege ca. 1710.  He is known to have made fine quality flintlock pistols, sporting rifles, and military fusils.     Our matched pair of large horse or holster pistols have beautiful relief carved walnut stocks with superb hand worked and engraved brass furniture with a semi grotesque, “scary pudgy face”,  worked and engraved into each of the brass butt caps.   Both retain their original wood ram rods, one is repaired.  Almost identical, except one has a brass breech plug tang while the other has steel.  Comments in the European museum catalogs indicate that Selier sometimes liked to use brass decoration on his barrels.  The wrist of each gun is inlaid with a pierced brass escutcheon.  When viewed at a distance these escutcheons are somewhat reminiscent of a skull.   The conversion to percussion ignition was done circa 1830s, and done expertly.  These 300 year old guns were used and cared for, for over a century as flintlocks.  After 100+ years they were then expertly converted to the new percussion system in the 1830s and used carefully for another generation or more.   I wish they could stand up and tell us their story.  They are truly magnificent.  They saw service from the days of Louis XIV, Louis XV, Louis XVI, the War of Spanish Succession  up through The French Revolution, into the French 1st Empire,  Waterloo era, and beyond… perhaps into the Crimea.    These are high quality arms that were expensive when they were produced, and are now extremely rare and valuable as collector’s arms.     In searching comparable guns on the market I find that a nearly identical single pistol in flintlock ignition with replaced cock sold for 3,120 Euros ($4,180 usd)  in March 2007 at a Sotheby’s Auction in Copenhagen.  Also found, a near identical single flintlock pistol advertised at $8,500 usd by Tortuga Trading Company and shown as sold.  Though ours have been converted to percussion,  the fact that they are a matched pair and still in truly fine condition allows me to price them at $4,950.00 with true conviction that they are a bargain at this price. A matched pair of quality 300 year old pistols….   For the pair…  $4,950.00.

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16-08-13 ...21st Ohio Surgeon’s Inscribed Colt Pocket Revolver with Extra Barrel housed in a Kidder Casing ...Really appealing.  1849 Colt pocket revolver with six inch barrel and SN 199139. Early 1862 production. Overall VG to near fine.  100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect.  Beautifully engraved on the back strap “Richd Gray Jr.  Asst. Surg. 21st O.V.I.”  Inscribed again on the butt strap  “J. Westerman”.  The gun is housed in one of the ultra desirable velvet lined Kidder Casings marked with the full Kidder patent and firm markings.  These boxes are extremely scarce and highly sought.  Inside the box is an extra barrel in 4 ¾ inch length with an extra wedge.  Really cool… we almost never see guns with extra barrels.  The extra barrel bears the standard one-line Colt NY barrel legend and neither the lug nor the wedge are numbered.  Clearly sold as a replacement or extra barrel by the factory.  Also in the box is a fine eagle motif powder flask, combination nipple wrench / screw driver, Colt marked brass bullet mold, and a key to the box.  The contents and box alone makes one heck of an item.  But this Colt has some great history attached to it.  Our surgeon Richard Gray Jr. served in a local Ohio regiment the 21st Ohio Infantry.  He served with the 21st from August 1862 through June of 1865.   During this period the regiment fought hard at Stones River, Chickamauga, Resaca, New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and Atlanta, Jonesboro, and Bentonville… taking many casualties.  172 men were killed or died of wounds, hundreds more were wounded.  Assistant Surgeon Gray would certainly have made use of his medical degree with this regiment.  The other name on the gun “J. Westerman” remains a mystery.  Westerman may have been the presenter of the gun, or he may have been a later owner.  My feeling is the latter.  While the Westerman inscription is professionally done, it was not executed by the same engraver who put the original Surgeon’s inscription on it.  The gun may have been given or sold by Gray to Westerman at some point.  Or it is possible that Westerman gave Gray the gun in 1862 and that is why he name is there.   There are eight men named J. Westerman who served in the Civil War from Ohio. More research will undoubtedly shed more light.  A high quality and extremely rare Kidder casing with a fine Colt carried by a doctor in the Civil War.  $7,900.00 SOLD

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16-08-15 ...4th Mass Cavalry Presentation Sword ...Iron hilted US import saber by Clauberg of Solingen in the style of the British 1823 pattern with a backstrap, knucklebow and two outboard branches, and a small inboard loop on the counterguard. “W. Clauberg” over a standing knight, over “Solingen” on the ricasso. Blade is nice, with good edge and point, and with visible etched panels: a “US” amid floral scrolls on one side and an American eagle with an “E Pluribus Unum” ribband on the other side. Blade overall shows a dull silver mixed with bright. Nicely engraved in a flowing script on the scabbard beneath the throat is: “Presented/ Lieut. Benj. Thomas / 4th Mass. Cavl. By the Phoenix Club” The Phoenix Club was a social club in Hingham, Mass., formed first in 1849 that adopted that title in 1856. It was largely engaged in organizing sociable, fancy dress-balls and 4th of July parades. The 4th Mass Cavalry was organized in February, 1864, by combining a battalion of the 1st Mass Cavalry with two other battalions formed in February and April. The battalions operated largely on their own during the war. Company C was part of the 2nd Battalion commanded by Major Keith and was sent to Hilton Head, where it took part in an expedition up the Ashepoo River in May. Two of the companies were then sent to Florida, where they were active in a number of expeditions and skirmishes, as were the two that remained on Hilton Head. The regiment lost 4 officers and 28 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded in their engagements. Thomas was from Hingham, Mass. and enlisted 12/17/63 as a Second Lieutenant and was commissioned in Co. C on 1/6/64. On 2/1/64 he was promoted to First Lieutenant and Quartermaster, which indicates he had some education and talent for organization. At some point he was even promoted to Acting Assistant Quartermaster for the Tenth Army Corps. He served through 12/9/64 and after the war he was a member of G.A.R. Post 29 in Waltham, Mass. He supplied a memoir of his service to the town’s history its service in the Civil War: In November, 1863, Mr. Thomas received an appointment as recruiting-officer; and, in the following December, was commissioned second lieutenant. Located at the time in Boston, he continued the work of enlistment; and, being quite successful, was commissioned Jan. 1, 1864, as first lieutenant, and assigned to the Fourth Mass. Cavalry as quartermaster. In April, 1864, with the regiment, was ordered to report to Gen. Gilmore, then in command of the Department of the South, with headquarters at Hilton Head, and three days after again embarked under orders to report at Fortress Monroe. His next destination was City Point, for the purpose of co-operating, under Gen. Butler, with all the armies of Virginia, in the "on to Richmond" movement of that year. Being the advance guard to City Point, the duties were numerous and the labor severe. Mr. Thomas, as quartermaster, was required to be constantly on the move. Besides being responsible for the supply of rations for men and horses, and other material for the general prosecution of the war, a further duty was imposed as "ordnance officer," by appointment of the colonel commanding. Soon after there came an acceptable change, in being detailed as A. A. Q. M. of the Tenth Army Corps, under Gen. Terry. Here he continued his labors until, by order of Gen. Butler, the corps was disintegrated, and united with others. Following this movement, Quartermaster Thomas, with other staff officers, was ordered to report to Gen. Weitzel, who had just been placed in command of the Twenty-fifth Corps, composed of twenty-five thousand colored troops. Some disaffection was created with respect to the classing of white troops with colored; but good feelings had the ascendency, and better judgment prevailed. Mr. Thomas affirms, that, during his entire experience, he found neither better nor braver men. In November and December of 1864, he aided in fitting out the noted Fort Fisher expedition under Gen. Butler, the result of which is well known. At the close of the year, he resigned his situation on account of repeated domestic affliction. Mr. Thomas retired from the service, having acceptably performed his multiplied and often perplexing duties. This is a nicely engraved presentation sword carried by an officer in a post that did not carry a lot of glory but immense responsibility. Inscribed cavalry officer’s sabers to cavalry officers are pretty darn scarce. $2,950.00

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16-08-16 ...COMPLETE LOCK FOR 1855 SPRINGFIELD RIFLE MUSKET ...One of the scarcer Civil War gun parts to acquire.  I have had this one for years thinking that some day I would find a musket needing this lock.  It hasn't happened yet so I will let it go.  100% original and complete.  Mechanically perfect.  A super nice example of a very rare gun lock.  $495.00 SOLD

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16-08-17 ..A DEAD-REAL SET OF CONFEDERATE SADDLE BAGS BELONGING TO A MEMBER OF MOSBY’S RANGERS: ...Identified Confederate cavalry saddlebags are unheard of rare. This is the only set I have ever owned, and I do not recall seeing any others outside the Confederate museums. They just surfaced in southern Virginia. Here’s a set not only with a dead real CS inscription, but one by a member of Mosby’s partisan rangers… the holy grail for any CS cavalry collector. John Singleton Mosby. One of the most romantic figures of the Lost Cause, he was renowned for his daring raids- kidnapping a Yankee general from his headquarters, destroying yankee supply trains, personally engaging Union cavalry with carbine and revolver, tying up huge Federal resources deployed in a vain effort to bag him. His operating territory was nicknamed “Mosby’s Confederacy” and he tangled with all prominent Yankee cavalry commanders including Custer. Custer hung some of Mosby’s men, Mosby hung some of Custer’s men. No love loss there. Here’s a full set of classic late 1850s-early 1860s saddlebags. A wide central strap connects two full leather bags, each of which has a thick, ribbed back panel that would rest against the horse’s flank and an outer flap that buckles shut at the bottom by two long billets on the lower cover and two buckles on the bottom of the bag. One billet is missing; the others are present. Tie down straps to secure the bags to the saddle are present at the upper, forward edge of each bag. Each bag measures roughly 14 x 13 inches. The body of each bag is leather, closed inside by a short slotted flap and faced by a thin canvas bag on the inside of the outer flap, also closed with a short flap. Trooper Washington penned his name in the bags twice: once on the leather of the right bag as simply “George Washington” and then again on the canvas bag facing it as “George Washington / Co. G Mosby’s Comd.” Both inscriptions are dead-real period brown ink inscriptions, and, even better, match up with a sample of his handwriting preserved on his 1865 parole, which got him released from a prisoner of war camp. Washington was described as standing 5’11”, with a fair complexion, dark hair and blue eyes. He was from Alexandria, Virginia, which was occupied by Federal forces early in the war. He apparently took this badly and decided to head a little farther south and carry on the war from there. Confederate records do not say when he joined Mosby’s command, which was organized in June, 1863, but they show that he was with them by the Fall of 1864 when they operated against Sheridan’s forces in the Shenandoah. Washington was captured in or near Winchester on September 19, 1864, and was sent to Point Lookout prison on 9/23/64, where he arrived three days later. His returns in the national archives show him as serving in both Co. “C” and Co. “G” of Mosby’s Rangers. The inscription in the saddle bags and the company designated on his oath of parole, signed at Ashland, Virginia, on April 28, 1865, both read Company G, which was originally Mosby’s “artillery company.” With the war plainly lost at this late date, Washington took his parole and returned to Alexandria, later signing the amnesty oath at the end of May. This is a rare chance to acquire not only a set of identified Confederate saddlebags, but a set carried in perhaps the most famous Confederate cavalry unit of all. I did an extensive search of all the major auction houses (Heritage, Julia, Skinner, Cowan’s) and could find no listing for any genuine Confederate identified saddle bags ever having sold at auction in recent years. I also checked my competent friends and competitor’s web sites with the same results. Dead real Mosby’s Rangers identified saddle bags…SOLD

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16-08-18 ...Regulation US army 1858 dress hat: aka the Hardee or Jeff Davis Hat. ...Nicely marked on the underside of the crown with “US Army” over an eagle and a size “4” stamp. Outfitted with a red artillery hat cord, plume, and a restrike side eagle plate. There are a few puncture holes on the front showing where other insignia was mounted. Since this one, like 999 out of 1000, was probably dressed up by one of the postwar surplus dealers, it could be left plain as a nice example of a campaign hat, or you could add cavalry insignia to it and increase its value by a thousand dollars. A little age wear and crazing to the brim and a couple of short tears that could be mended. A decent example at a great price. A darn nice example that would have brought $4500 five years ago. $3,250.00 SOLD

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16-08-20 ...Cavalry sword belt plate ... Buckle depicts patriotic eagle, and was used by by officers carrying swords, and enlisted cavalry, following the regulation of 1851, most were manufactured 1850's to end of the Civil War. The plate was made of cast brass, eagle is integral to the casting, wreath is applied. The thick necked eagle faces right, rays above the banner, 13 stars, ten above the banner in two rows, one left of the eagle's head and two to the right, symmetrical shield bears stars and stripes. The narrow tongue is integral to the casting, thinner tip is bent, intended to fasten to a separate brass keeper. Silver wreath is soldered in three pieces, above and below the wing tips.. $295 SOLD

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16-08-21 ...Oval U.S. Buckle ...This is a standard US buckle worn by Civil War infantrymen. Measures just over 3 and 1/4 inches wide. It is lead filled and has the arrow hooks on the back. Overall fine condition showing just the right amount of age. $235

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16-06-21 ... INCREDIBLY EFFECTIVE LIGHTED MAGNIFYING GLASS / PERFECT FOR INSPECTING ANTIQUES ... You have undoubtedly seen collectors at the shows running around with one of these magnifying glasses in their hand. There's a good reason ... they are SUPER! Months ago I bought one for myself and loved it. Then the local guys wanted one and I bought another half dozen for them at $25 each at the next show ... Then I bought another one for me when I arrived at a show and discovered I'd left mine at home. I figured with as many as I was buying at retail, I might as well buy them in bulk and sell them at the shows and on the web page. These are absolutely essential for anyone buying antiques at shows or auctions. The intense illumination from the twelve LED light sources and 2x magnification exposes "artificial age" such as cold-blue on metal or amber shellac on wood. Shine this light and you will see if someone has "aged" or repaired the item you wish to buy. The magnification accompanied by the intense illumination reveals cracks and repairs that the naked eye cannot pick up. Requires 3 AA batteries (not included) ... $25.00

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