Click here to see great civil war antiques we have sold in the past.Click here to see our current civil war web catalog.We buy antiques. Click here to learn about our antique purchasing.

Bayonets

Swords

CDVs

Miscellanea

Leather

Historical

Knives

Confederate

Hard Images

Guns

Ephemera

Uniforms

Welcome to our Civil War Antiques web catalog.

Please send all Checks and Money orders to :

Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

Click Here to E-mail Us!

LAYAWAYS ARE WELCOME:
Need to split your order into multiple payments? No problem! A simple 20% earnest money deposit will hold your item for you.
You can then pay it off in easy installments that fit your budget.
READ LAYAWAY TERMS HERE
~~~~~~~~~~
READ SHIPPING TERMS HERE
~~~~~~~~~~



16-08-00 ..SOUTH CAROLINA CONFEDERATE WEAPONS & EFFECTS OF CAPT. THOMAS KINCAID ANDERSON ...I purchased this archive through a friend and fellow collector who was neighbors with the Great Great Grandaughter of T.K. Anderson.  I made my check payable to Ms. Anderson when we consummated the deal.  This grouping descended in the family until my purchase.  They are a very prominent founding family of Fairfield County, SC,  with roots going back to Colonial times. Accompanying this lot is the published history of the family with many entries on Thomas Kincaid Anderson and his connection to the Lost Cause.   Typical large southern land owning families in the 18th century, had many family members involved in the militia starting with Cherokee Indian wars of the 1760s, Revolutionary War, War of 1812 where William Kincaid raised his own volunteer company.  Several family members attended the Citadel including 2 of Thomas’ older brothers & a younger brother John who was killed near Atlanta August 31, 1864.  Thomas was near his home when Sherman burned Columbia and was said to have buried the family silver & jewelry prior to Sherman’s “bummers” ransacking their stately home “House on the Rock” where this archive originated. The 100 page accompanying history is actually titled The House on the Rock.   The U.S.C. Carolina Library has over 2500 family documents in the “Kincaid-Anderson” family papers which should be researched. This grouping includes 1) extremely rare “KRAFT, GOLDSCHMIDT & KRAFT” staff officer’s sword made in Columbia, SC; 2) South Carolina buff leather sword belt with 2-pc interlocking sword belt plate with South Carolina State seal; 3) Confederate brown leather holster with Colt Navy revolver SN 184564 which was made in 1865; 4) Confederate tin canteen with original canvas sling. All these items have same “as found” appearance with heavy patina.  CONDITION: 1) Very good “as found” with 32″ single fullered blade. Blade etch is only partially discernible with old sharpening, “COLUMBIA” can still be ascertained on one ricasso & patriotic motif of crossed cannons is still partially visible. Blade overall is gray with staining & pitting & the old sharpening obscures most of the etch. Original scabbard body is sound & solid with iron patina. Hilt & brass scabbard mounts have dark grungy mustard/chocolate patina. Grip retains 95% of its orig leather though dry, cracked & scuffed. Orig thin brass wire is intact with dark patina. 2) White buff belt is sound & solid with soiling & staining & 2 reductions on top left side, about 1 x 1/2″. Buckle is fine retaining traces of gold plating with die-tamped SC state seal slightly bent. Tongue & wreath have matching “H” surrounded by 4-dot assembly mark, belt loops measure 51mm & is 89mm overall & identical assembly marked plate is not found in Mullinax, Kerksis, or Topper. Often sword belts were sold with swords but this belt predates the KG&K sword. Buckle has chocolate patina with plated highlights showing through. 3) Colt Navy all matching with dark iron patina with strong traces of bright blue in protected areas. Brass trigger guard & backstrap have strong traces of orig silver plate with overall mustard colored patina. Grips retain most of their orig varnished finish. Capt. Anderson’s initials are neatly scratched on buttstrap “TA”. Revolver has very tight action, a little wobbly between bbl & frame. There are 7 notches cut in right grip. Holster accompanying this gun is typical plantation made flap holster with odd brass finial, holster is sound & supple retaining good color with scuffing & cracking with losses & several cracks at muzzle end. Holster was resewn during its time of service for continued use. How did Capt. Anderson end up with this revolver that was made in 1865? There were Union occupation troops for several years after the war & there was continued violence among Southern conservative organizations in “unredeemed” South Carolina til 1877 when occupation troops were finally removed ending reconstruction. Anderson’s obituary & tombstone state his name as Capt. Thomas Anderson. Despite loads of family biography I have not yet been able to determine Anderson’s precise military designation.  My feeling is that he may have been on staff duty, perhaps at the state level as opposed to Confederate Central Government.   His obituary does state he was director of the State Penitentiary which was not far from the family home in Columbia. 4) Classic Confederate tin canteen measuring 6-1/8″ in diameter, 2″ wide with soldered tin spout, 3 tin loops with canvas sling missing its attachment but otherwise very good & “as found” with patina, rust & several dents & scratches, coarse cotton sling is about 50″ long & 1″ wide with soiling & staining. Ends attached with an old straight pin. Also accompanying this lot is an 18″ cylindrical tin document or map case with friction fit lid with Capt. Anderson’s son’s initials “EKA” scratched in the lid.   Here is one heck of a spectacular Confederate lot.  One of the best rebel groupings I have owned, and I am the first person to own it outside of the Anderson family.  Priced very realistically at… $33,500.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-22 ...EARLY PRODUCTION (1870) NRA EXCELLENT CONDITION MODEL 1866 WINCHESTER RIFLE:... I can’t praise this gun enough. The absolute finest 66 rifle I have owned, and perhaps the best condition example currently for sale.  44 caliber, 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect, and way beyond extra fine condition.  THE gun that won the west in screaming top end condition.  NRA “Excellent+” condition.   A true gem.  OK… enough of that.  The photos do not justly capture the blue finish.  24” octagon barrel retains 95% of its original bright factory blue finish. Mint edges and mint markings. The hammer exhibits 90% case color.  Bore is superb.  The brass frame and furniture has an absolutely PERFECT undisturbed dark mustard age patina.  No nicks, no cleaned areas, perfect and untouched.   Rear sight is simple fixed notch block sight. Fitted with sling swivels.  The wood is likewise excellent with sharp edges and no damage.  Serial number 39066-B puts the date of manufacture at 1870.  If this was a Henry rifle it would fetch around a hundred thousand dollars.  It is not mint but it isn’t far off.  If you can find a comparable gun at this price… you should buy it!  If you know of a comparable gun for sale at "a margin" less than this price, tell me and I'll buy it.    $22,500.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-23 ...SUPERB, INVESTMENT GRADE, KITTREDGE & C0. MARKED LARGE BORE KERR CARTRIDGE REVOLVER : SHADES OF GEORGE AND TOM CUSTER! ...Excellent condition large army bore Kerr’s London Armoury , Adams pattern, double-action cartridge revolver with a renowned US western retailer’s stamp! High quality British firearms were admired by men heading west as much as anyone else. Custer carried a pair of “British bulldogs” at the Little Big Horn and there is a fine cased set known to have belonged to his brother Tom. The Custer guns are very similar in configuration to our revolver. Here is a top shelf 45 caliber revolver with about 95% of its lustrous original blue that is a true wild west gun, bearing on its right flat the retailer stamp of Kittredge and Company of Cincinnati and dating to about 1875 by the maker’s address on the frame. It is about the same size as a Colt Single Action Army revolver. It has a 5.25” barrel and a six shot cylinder. Ben Kittredge is well known. The company supplied westerners with arms and equipment starting in 1847. Adams in London put out the last of their double-action percussion arms in 1866 and switched to cartridge arms with a pattern 1867 pistol, followed up by an 1872 and several variations. Our revolver dates to about 1875, the year James Kerr and Co. purchased London Armoury (successor to the Civil War London Armoury Co., which failed in 1866) and moved it to Kerr’s premises at 54 King William Street, where it continued to trade as “London Armoury.” The checkered wood grips are excellent, with rounded butt and small lanyard ring. The wood to metal fit is tight. The fixed ejector rod is in place on the right and shows some light wear from use, the color being a dull gray. Barrel has some small areas of brown peeking through the blue on the side flat. Balance of the barrel is better than 90% bright blue. Frame and cylinder likewise preserve 90% lustrous blue. The loading gate, like the ejector rod shows gray from use. Top strap of frame engraved “London Armoury Jas. Kerr & Co.” and “54 King William St. E.C.” Right lower frame engraved “B.L. 979” over “Adams Patent 39,979.” Right frame forward of cylinder: “B. Kittredge & Co. / Cin. O.” Cylinder stamped “Steel.” This is a wonderful cowboy, wild west era revolver retailed by a real western gun shop during the Indian Wars. It’s a superb combination of history and condition! Top shelf on all fronts. $2,500.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-24 ...A TRUE MATCHED PAIR OF FINE CONDITION COLT POCKET REVOLVERS ...A genuine matching pair of Colt pocket revolvers. Serial numbers 312636 and 312811. Both manufactured within a day or two of each other in 1869, with matching fine condition and patina, and less than 200 numbers apart. Matching near perfect walnut grips on both rate excellent plus. Both grips have the desirable Henry rifle type varnished red-orange color and tone. Medium patina on the brass on each gun, a tad darker on 811. Matching faded blue on both 4 inch barrels and matching traces of case color on both frames. The cylinder on 811 shows a bit more brown and slightly less crisp scene and marks, but both are nicely visible. 636 also shows a slightly sharper barrel address, so it looks like 811 was the pistol the owner carried more. Probably the “right hand gun”. These would look great cased together if you happen to know where an empty 2-gun casing can be found, or if you want to make or buy a custom box, that would be neat. Or… if you have a pair of period holsters and a belt, (or buy same at the next antique arms show), that would really make a heck of a cowboy display with these great old matched Colts. A very handsome, true matched pair of very early western Colt pockets. $3,500.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-25 ...SUPERB FIRST MODEL M-1855 - SPRINGFIELD RIFLE MUSKET-FINE PLUS ... One of the most highly sought of all the US .58 caliber weapons, and in top shelf condition.  100% correct pre-1859 configuration with a brass nose cap, long range rear sight, and no patch box.  Classic first model ’55.   Maynard tape primer in place and functional.  Steel mounts and barrel are crisp and an attractive  dull silver in color.  Lock plate markings and barrels proofs are crisp.  No pitting at breech and nipple not battered.  Some very slight rounding to stock edges from handling, minor dings on the offside flat, some short, deep scratches just above the butt plate tang. Has early type long range rear sight.  Bands, springs, swivels and rod in place. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect.   Nice deep tone to the wood and mellow patina to the brass cap. This is a sharp example of the rifle musket in the new 1855 series of arms that introduced weapons firing the .58 cal. minie ball and was a standard Civil War long arm. This would be a great addition to a Civil War or US martial arms collection.  $3,650.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-26 ...LUFTWAFFE GENERAL’S AUTOMOBILE PENNANT ...A superb US WW2 veteran’s bring-back: the triangular double sided pennant in deep Luftwaffe gray with a swastika embroidered bullion tape border on each side and the Luftwaffe eagle and swastika meticulously hand embroidered in gold bullion thread.  Measures roughly 17 inches long by 10 inches on the hoist edge.  The hoist edge was cut by the American trophy hunter to remove it from the kraut staff car.  A few tiny spots of mothing on either side, but barely noticeable since the back of the opposite fabric masks them.  Some minor verdigris staining to the bullion tape here and there.  There is likely a way to remove it, but since that is not my area of expertise I will leave it alone.    High ranking US officers often confiscated the fancy German staff cars, and sent the accompanying trophies home.  This pennant is an exceedingly rare piece of Third Reich insignia. I have done extensive Google research on the Third Reich specialty web sites.   Ron Wolin’s page has a one sided example priced at $1995.00.  Emedals.com shows a two sided example (like mine) as having sold for $2950.00   Themarshallsbaton.com page has two variants (two sided) at 2500.00 and 2450.00.  I found mine locally at very little cost, so I am pricing it darn friendly… $1,450.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-27 ...SECOND MODEL BURNSIDE CARBINE ...A scarce, early configuration of the well known Burnside carbine. Only about 2,000 of this rare second pattern were made from 1860 to 1862. The most distinguishing feature of this model is that, like the first pattern, it does not utilize a forestock. Fire one of these several times in quick succession in the hot sun and you will know one reason why troopers wore gauntlets. HOT BARREL! This one is numbered 463 on the receiver and breechblock, putting it very early in the production run that started from about number 250. These were made both by the Burnside Firearms Co. and the Bristol Firearms Co. Ours has the Bristol Firearms Co. stamp at the rear of the lockplate. The Burnside patent stamp on the top of the receiver is legible, as is the serial number. The butt stock is tight to the metal. It shows some scrapes and scratches from use, but nothing horrible, and the butt plate tang screw needs to be replaced. The butt plate tang is a bit crusty. The metal is a deep plum brown patina overall, smooth on the barrel and more textured on the receiver and lockplate. Cavalry units such as 1st Maine, 1st New Jersey and others are known to have carried this rare early war model. Even more interesting is that Burnside’s own 1st Rhode Island infantry carried some at the Battle of First Bull Run. Yup, infantry with carbines. A very scarce early war carbine in NRA very good condition. $3,175.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-28 ...BEAUTIFULLY INSCRIBED VERY EARLY WAR SIX-INCH COLT POCKET ...Beautifully inscribed down the back strap…  “Presented to Lieut. M.P. O’Brien 15th Regt. N.Y.S.V.”   Michael P. O’Brien  enrolled for two years and was mustered in as First Lieutenant of Company “F” at age 32 on 6/17/61 at Willets Point, N.Y.  His commission was dated 7/4/61 and gave him rank from 5/9/61.  The regiment was one of the early war regiments from New York recruited under state authority for two years, rather than three.  They were intended to be an engineer regiment, but served as infantry until October, 1861.  Company F, O’Brien’s company, recruited north of NY City,  mainly in the Albany and Kingston area.  The regiment left New York in late June and during O’Brien’s service was stationed at Fairfax Seminary manning picket lines as part of McCunn’s Brigade.  He served with the regiment only in the summer of 1861…  resigning his commission on 8/10/61 at Fairfax Seminary, Va.  O’Brien’s Colt has a nice even faded blue turned plum brown color overall with some faded case color on the frame and some original blue on the screwheads as well.   Very handsome.  Some slight traces of the silver wash on the brass, which has a pleasing, medium age patina.  Has visible cylinder scene.  All matching serial numbers 174371.  The grips are excellent and the engraving on the backstrap is very pleasing.  One of the most attractive inscribed Colt’s I’ve found lately.  Very early war.  $3,250.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-29 ...IVORY GRIPPED NIMSCHKE(?) ENGRAVED SMITH AND WESSON No. 1 SECOND ISSUE REVOLVER: ...Beautifully engraved with elaborate scroll and shell designs on the frame, cylinder, and barrel.  This is a pretty vest pocket revolver that would fit perfectly in an old-west display.  The engraving appears to have been done by L.D. Nimschke or one of his followers.  Truly outstanding quality scroll, shell, and foliate patterns, definitely of the New York school of which Nimschke was the master.   Serial number 70525.  This second issue was made from 1860 to 1868 and continued the serial numbering of the first issue, placing this one about midway in the production run.  Firing .22 bullets is not the deadliest caliber… so the seven-shot cylinder gave the shooter enough firepower to compensate.  It is a perfect high stakes poker-player’s pocket revolver.  With the ivory grips and engraving it was obviously carried by someone of means and taste. The custom engraving would have cost a small fortune in the 1860s.  The brass frame preserves about 90 percent of its silver plating, with just the expected wear on high spots.  The cylinder, forward frame and barrel show a bit darker gray but the contrast is not a sharp one. Dark spots mixed with gray overall forward and a small bit of brown creeping through on the cylinder.  The barrel carries on with the same engraving.  The barrel is somewhat worn and exhibits some light pitting, still VG.    The factory ivory grips are excellent, and the engraving is sharp.  This is a darn pretty gun, and very desirable with the Nimschke form engraving.  $1,250.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

 



16-08-30 ...MOORE’S PATENT REVOLVER ...Seven shot Moore patent .32 rimfire revolver.  A favorite of Civil War officers, the Moore was made from 1861 to 1863.  Somewhere around 8,000 were manufactured.  This one, number 7585, would be toward the end of the series.  Overall VG condition.  All original and complete and mechanically VG.  The cylinder swings out for loading and the ejector rod simply comes out to poke out the spent cases by hand.    This one bears the scarce “Manfd’ for Smith & Wesson By Moore’s Patent Firearms Co.” marking on the top flat.  Moore lost a patent suit with Smith & Wesson and afterwards marked their guns as this one is marked… the proceeds of sales going to S&W.  The right hand portion is light, but the key, left portion is very visible.  The wood to metal fit is tight.  The barrel and cylinder are smooth with matching blue turned plum brown.  The silver plating is mostly gone from the brass, as is usually the case,  but the deep, beautiful scroll engraving is sharp.  A very nice mid-war side arm that would really dress up an officer’s display. $795.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-31 ...PATCHBOX SHARPS CARBINE ...A very good, early war example of the Sharps New Model 1859 carbine.   It’s arguably the most popular and most recognizable Civil War carbine of all.  Barrel is an attractive smooth oxidized plum brown patina.   Receiver and lock are a dull silver gray with scattered darker gray spots, and faint whispers of cloud-like faded case color.   Crisp Sharps patent stamps on the lock, receiver offside, and just slightly rubbed on the barrel legend and model designation.  Side bar and sling ring are present.  Mechanism is tight.  Rear of forend shows a little wear at the receiver,  and there is some wear on the left wrist from the sling ring.  Both inspector's cartouches are present under the sling-ring bar.   The wood to metal fit overall is tight.  Butt stock shows minor wear.  The patchbox door functions fine. The patchbox and butt plate show silver gray.  Serial number 59, 324 puts it a little past halfway through the production run that began about number 30,000 and ran to about 75,000 before the changeover to the New Model 1863.  Likely produced in late 1861 or early 1862.   The Sharps was a very well liked and highly regarded cavalry arm used by troopers north and south in every theater of the war.  It’s a key American carbine and a key piece in a cavalry collection as well.  This is a very representative example and one you can be proud to display.  $2,895.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-32 ...REMINGTON-RIDER POCKET REVOLVER ...These double-action .31 caliber percussion revolvers were made by Joseph Rider of Newark, Ohio, on contract with Remington before he moved to Ilion, NY, and became part of the company.  Total production was only about 2,000 guns between 1860 and 1873, and that number is split between the percussion and cartridge versions of the arm.  Ours is serial number 518.  The grips are the standard hard-rubber grips and are in excellent condition, which is a real plus.  The original blue finish has now turned plum brown overall, showing some case color on the frame and thinning out to mixed brown and pewter tone near the muzzle.  The top barrel flat has some heavy pitting at the beginning of the two-line barrel address, and smaller areas of pitting toward the cylinder, but the patent dates and most of the address are visible.  A few nicks in the barrel edges show the gun saw some use and there is some light pitting on the bottom flat as well.  That having been said, this is still a scarce gun and desirable as one of the first double action revolvers made in any quantity in the U.S.  Plus, you have to love those grips!  A nice, American made pocket pistol from the early days of such guns.  $595.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-33 ...EXTRA FINE CONDITION BROOKLYN ARMS SLOCUM REVOLVER ...The photos of this one do not show the blue properly.  This gun has LOADS of brilliant factory high luster blue.  The bottom picture is closest to accurate.   NRA extra fine condition.  These five-shot .32 caliber rimfire revolvers were one more attempt to get around the “bored-through” cylinder patent of Rollin White that was owned by Smith and Wesson.  The idea on this revolver was that individual chambers in the cylinder had sliding tubes that would be pushed forward over a fixed ejector rod to get rid of empty shell cases.  It’s another great example of mid-nineteenth century American inventiveness and engineering. (I’ve always thought the ridges on the aft part of the cylinder make it look a bit like a Buck Rogers ray gun--- for those of you old enough to know who Buck Rogers was.)  The barrel shows an impressive amount of brilliant blue (60%), with just some small brown spots peaking through on the left.  The top photos were taken in fluorescent light and have caused the blue to look grey.  The cylinder preserves better than 80 percent of its beautiful bright blue.  The brass frame shows about 15% of its original silver wash.  The floral engraving on each side, however, is crisp.  The grips are excellent. Serial number is 6614, putting it a bit past the midway mark in a production run estimated at 10,000. Crisp “B.A. Co. Patent April 14th 1863” barrel stamp on the top. Front sight in place. Mechanically perfect.   A top shelf example of this cool pistol.  $1,250.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-34 ...HEAVY CAVALRY SABER WITH A JOHNNY REB TEXAS CONNECTION ...A Clemen and Jung import saber marked with the scarce “C & J” “no box” maker stamp. This saber follows the US 1840 pattern heavy cavalry saber (the old French 1822) supplied by most foreign makers to the warring parties on this continent. The thin black leather grip wrap is about 60 percent intact over the underlying cord, but the dark patina of the wood underneath makes it pretty uniform to the eye. The wire binding is all present and a little loose. The brass guard has a nice, dark untouched color and the steel scabbard with its typical European side rivet at the throat is likewise untouched and a deep bluish brown. The blade has a good edge and point, and is a mixed dull silver with deep gray and some light brown overall. Thillmann notes that the C & J stamp at the ricasso without a surrounding round-end box is a scarce version of the company mark and notes that it is “possible, indeed likely” that their swords went both north and south. This is especially relevant here since the local collector from whom I obtained it had bought it at a garage sale for fifty dollars when he lived in Texas some thirty years ago. There’s no telling how it got there, of course, but it stands a darn good chance of having hung on a saddle in one of the many hard-riding Texas cavalry outfits that fought in all theatres of the war. A good solid example of the “Old Wristbreaker”… $550.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-35 ...LARGE ENGLISH LAND PATTERN FLINTLOCK CAVALRY PISTOL CA. 1810 ...This pattern was introduced in 1795 and was in widespread use by 1802.  The British designated it “land pattern”  to distinguish it from those designed for naval use.  This is a cavalry flintlock pistol with an 8 ½ inch barrel, in .66 caliber. Overall VG condition.   The pistol shows smooth bright steel on the barrel,  lock and the rammer assembly, and a nice medium toned brass on the trigger guard, butt cap, and nose cap.  The rammer is mounted with a capture-swivel to prevent it being lost while reloading on horseback or in action, and shows a lanyard ring in the brass butt cap to prevent its loss if dropped after being drawn from the saddle holster. Barrel inspection and proof marks are present and visible,  very slightly rubbed.  The barrel and lock plate are bright with just some scattered gray.  The wood is excellent, with a rich tone and a small “IA” owner’s initials lightly scratched over the side plate.  The lock plate shows the rampant lion of the British East India Company, a fascinating British business monopoly that fielded its own armies, military and naval forces in India and elsewhere, part of the system that made sure the “sun never set on the British empire.”  They started using the lion on the lock plates of their arms around 1805.   A fine early weapon in original flintlock ignition that is now over 200 years old.  $1,500.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-36 ...BROWN MANUFACTURING CO. “SOUTHERNER” DERRINGER ...About 16,500 of these .41 caliber rimfire Derringers were made from 1866 to 1873. This is marked on the left side flat: “Brown Mfg. Co. / Newburyport Mass./ Pat. Apr. 9, 1867. “ Flayderman notes this marking appears on about 6,500 guns made from 1866 to 1869. This one is numbered 5250, so we are pretty near the latter date. The brass frame has a deep mellow, aged patina, and the rosewood grips are excellent with just some minor dings and scratches on the butt flat. The barrel swings sideways for loading and the rifling is good. Overall VG+++ condition. Flayderman notes that even given the large production run it is tough to find these with any sort of condition. The barrel on this shows a dull silver gray, with no blue remaining, but is very good with smooth metal and just some tiny dark spots on the left. The main drawing point on these Derringers, and certainly intentional, is the barrel marking “Southerner.” Willing to let bygones be bygones, this Massachusetts maker was obviously aiming for a southern market, conjuring up images of the original prewar Deringers in the pockets of southern gentlemen. It is not mentioned in the secondary sources, but I suspect the use of an April 9 patent date may also have been intentional, since it is the date of Lee’s surrender. In addition to this, the manufacturer also went by the name of Merrimack Arms… another oblique reference to the CSS Merrimac??? Display with with riverboat gambler effects. A tight solid example just shy of fine condition. $695.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-37 ...ALLEN AND WHEELOCK SHORT BARREL SIDE HAMMER REVOLVER ...I’ve always liked side hammer revolvers. They are a nice mix old and new styles, though gunsmiths apparently preferred them as easier to work on.  This is a nice example of the .32 rimfire side hammer made by Allen and Wheelock from about 1859 to 1862.  There were only something over a thousand made, but there were several types and a number of variations.  This fits the second model in having a mortised front sight and a July 3, 1860 date partially visible forward of the cylinder, but with the first type button headed cylinder pin.  The barrel measures 2 ¾  inches.  Overall length about 7 inches.  The grips are excellent.  The metal is an even silver gray overall with some light pitting just forward of the cylinder, likely from the discharge of the gun. The cylinder itself keeps some of its color and the cylinder scene of dogs chasing a rabbit is visible, which is uncommon since it was lightly rolled.  The 1858 patent stamp is sharp on the left barrel flat, but the July 3, 1860 stamp is obscured by the pitting from firing. The German silver front sight is in place. The ejector rod and barrel showing matching bench number 349. Overall VG cond.*    Hammer will not stay on full cock unless you point the barrel toward the floor, which tells me the sear is worn and a spring needs attention.  I’ll leave that to you.  Priced like a gift…   $395.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-38 ...ALLEN AND WHEELOCK LONG BARREL SIDE HAMMER REVOLVER ...Here’s our second A & W side hammer. This one has a 3 ¾ inch barrel and is 7 ½ inches overall. It is six shot and .32 rimfire as above. The 1858 two-line patent stamp on the left flat is crisp and the July 3, 1860 stamp on the left frame forward of the cylinder is light, but legible. As with our first one, the metal is a mix of dull silver and gray, though with more brown. The metal is smooth overall with a few light dots on the right frame forward of the cylinder. The cylinder is a bit dark, but the scene is visible. The brass front sight is mortised, and the cylinder pin has a cylindrical head and latch below as seen on the .22 caliber versions. The grips are excellent. The barrel shows number 452, but these are batch numbers rather than serial numbers for the whole manufacturing run. All original and mechanically fine. These are interesting pistols with lots of variations for the collector. $525.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-39 ...Horstmann US Cavalry Officer's Sword & Scabbard ...Handsome,  import Yankee cavalry officer's saber with nice detail and hand chasing on the guard, with a military etched blade, and marked by famed US military outfitter Horstmann.  "Iron Proof" blade etching on the spine near the guard, typical of German made swords imported here by American retailers in large quantities during the war.  A robust saber modeled on the US 1840 pattern.  Hilt retains full ray skin on the grip and twisted wire binding.  Nice age darkened patina to the brass hilt and mounts.  Pommel has a floral motif on its face that carries over to the leaves cast in the guard branches and inside of the counterguard.  Scabbard is plain steel in good solid condition.   Overall blade is a mix of dull silver and light gray with a few darker areas. It has a good edge and no pitting. A very presentable mounted officer's saber priced friendly.  It came with a knot which we offer as an option.  e-ark  $950.00 sword alone  $1,125.00 w/ knot SOLD

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-40 ...WONDERFUL NON REGULATION STAFF OFFICER’S SWORD AND SCABBARD: ...I really like this sword. It is a much higher quality and fancy variant of the famed Peterson figure 75 officer’s sword. VG condition with full shagreen grip wrap and twisted wire binding. The blade is nicely etched with standard US military markings and motifs. The guard is super with a swoop-neck eagle and letters US. Super. Brass mounted steel scabbard. I don’t believe I’ve ever owned the precise pattern previously. The elaborate brass guard and pommel cap makes me think it is an English product. Certainly one of the rarer US officers’ swords one could find. $1,350.00 SOLD

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-43 ...SPECTACULAR M1840, 1850 Dated Ames Heavy Cavalry Saber and Scabbard / Matched Inspectors’ Marks / MINT BLADE: ...M1840 Heavy Cavalry Saber, marked “AMES MFG. CO. / CABOTVILLE /1850” and “US / A.D.K.” ... this "wristbreaker" saber and scabbard are both in extra FINE++ condition. The blade is damn near mint… retains virtually all of its’ brilliant factory luster, and most of the cross-brushing.  Nick free, bright and beautiful.  The leather grip is likewise super as is the twisted binding wire.  The guard … top shelf.  Pommel marked “ADK” and “JWR”.   The scabbard is very fine except for an area of moderate surface pitting just north of the drag. (See Illus.)  Drag nicely marked with matching inspector’s initials “ADK”.    Years ago this rig would have sold in a heartbeat at nearly two thousand dollars.  I can sell it for $1,350.00 SOLD

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-44 ...MODEL 1863 SPRINGFIELD RIFLE MUSKET – TYPE-I ...The 1863 Springfield introduced some changes to the 1861 pattern that preceded it. The S-shaped beveled hammer was an improvement, and the cleanout screw on the bolster was eliminated.  Less successful was elimination of barrel band retaining springs.  It was soon discovered that recoil would dislodge the new 1863 clamping friction bands and in the 1863 Type-II pattern the band springs reappeared.  This is a very good and solid condition example with clear 1863 U.S. Springfield lock markings.  The eagle on the bolster is weak but visible.  The wood is very good overall.  Breech area has some moderate pitting which partially obliterates the barrel date.  The barrel mark "18" is visible the "63" is not.   The rear sight is in place, as is original ramrod,  both swivels etc…  The inspector's cartouches on the stock are no longer visible.  The bore is about good.   Mechanically perfect. A very representative example priced fairly...  h-Ark  $1,250.00 SOLD

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-46 ...16-03-15 ... NEPPERHAN POCKET PISTOL / RICHMOND VIRGINIA? ...Attending the Baltimore Gun Show last week I heard a story about Nepperhan revolvers. Apparently there is a new book, or recent monograph published that relates the story of Nepperhan trying to sell his revolvers to the US government where he was rebuked due to the small caliber. Incensed he is reported to have travelled to Richmond where he was gladly received and sold 500 or 1000 pieces. I have not independently confirmed this report, but the collector who related the story to me was quite certain of the facts, and seemed on the level. This would give these scarce little pocket revolvers a real nice Confederate association. Nepperhans are similar to the Bacon and Manhattan revolvers in featuring a removable sideplate. The two-piece grips are in good condition with just slight wear at the upper left. Mechanics are good. Metal is mixed gray and plum brown with some very faint case on the receiver and darker cylinder. The cylinder retains much of its original blue finish, and the barrel sides retain hints of blue. Barrel markings on the top flat are a bit light, but are the second type mentioned by Flayderman used on guns over the 4,000 serial number range: "Nepperhan F.A. Co. Yonkers NY" Flayderman estimates a total run of about 5,000 starting in the early 1860s. 100% original and correct. Mechanically perfect. Quite scarce ... $850.00 SOLD

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



16-08-47 ... 16-02-76 ... 69 CALIBER CARTRIDGE BOX AND BOX PLATE DEFINITELY CARRIED IN THE WAR ...The regulation issue, early war, Civil War Union infantryman's .69 caliber cartridge box. Loads scarcer than the common .58 caliber examples. This is the early war version using just a straight line of stitching to secure the latch tab and shoulder belt buckles on the bottom of the box. Designed to be worn on the waist belt or the shoulder belt, these boxes were intended to hold forty cartridges. The oval box plate was intended to keep the flap down even if unlatched in combat. An inner flap and side ears help protect the cartridges and a small pouch on the front of the box held the soldier's gun tools. This one needs only the internal tins to be complete. But why bother? Ordnance inspectors often commented on soldiers' tendency to throw them away once drawn in combat to access the ammunition in their lower compartments. Rufus Dawes of the Sixth Wisconsin made especial note of this. The contour of the belt loops show it was actually issued and worn. The plate is original and bears a super patina. Good early war cartridge box perfect to display with an 1816 conversion or 1842 musket r ... $435.00 SOLD

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

16-08-48 ... INCREDIBLY EFFECTIVE LIGHTED MAGNIFYING GLASS / PERFECT FOR INSPECTING ANTIQUES ... You have undoubtedly seen collectors at the shows running around with one of these magnifying glasses in their hand. There's a good reason ... they are SUPER! Months ago I bought one for myself and loved it. Then the local guys wanted one and I bought another half dozen for them at $25 each at the next show ... Then I bought another one for me when I arrived at a show and discovered I'd left mine at home. I figured with as many as I was buying at retail, I might as well buy them in bulk and sell them at the shows and on the web page. These are absolutely essential for anyone buying antiques at shows or auctions. The intense illumination from the twelve LED light sources and 2x magnification exposes "artificial age" such as cold-blue on metal or amber shellac on wood. Shine this light and you will see if someone has "aged" or repaired the item you wish to buy. The magnification accompanied by the intense illumination reveals cracks and repairs that the naked eye cannot pick up. Requires 3 AA batteries (not included) ... $25.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863


















 

Click Here to go back to the top.