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Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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16-11-01 ...BOARDERS AWAY! A US SHORT SWORD WITH AN EXCITING C.S. NAVAL BATTLE HISTORY AND WONDERFUL CONFEDERATE INSCRIPTION... This sword was part of the collection of long time Ohio collector Tom Jones for a quarter century or more. Tom passed away a couple years back and I bought most of the sword collection from the family early in 2016. Tom purchased this sword way back when from Confederate arms specialist Don Bryan. Tom’s son related that dad had paid $5000 for it back when $5000 was serious money. The sword is a standard US Model 1832 artillery short sword and scabbard in Very Good condition. It is well marked with a full Ames firm marking as well as “United States” and “1833”. The scabbard is excellent. Inscribed (likely by the rebel sailor himself) on the cross guard is the historical notation… “Used by Masters Mate A.C. Freeman C.S. Navy in / Capturing U.S. Steamer Water Witch June 4th 1864.”

One of the few real naval boarding actions of the Civil War took place in the early hours of June 3, 1864, when Lt. Thomas P. Pelot, CSN, led a force of 14 officers and 117 men in taking the USS Water Witch. Of some note is the rebs main boat was piloted by a black slave named Moses Dallas who also held a Commission in the CS Navy. He drew full pay of $80 and then later $100 per month, and he was actively engaged in the attack being shot in the face and killed by a Union officer. He was given a heroes funeral by the local Confederates.

The U.S.S. Water Witch was a sidewheel steamer commissioned in the US Navy in 1851. Carrying four guns, the vessel was used as an active blockader off Florida, Georgia and South Carolina, and also as a mail and dispatch vessel. Because of the vessel’s shallow draft, it was particularly useful in river patrols and expeditions. While stationed at the mouth of the Little Ogeechee River, in Ossabaw Sound near Savannah, the ship became the target of a Confederate raiding party. Boarding seven boats described as tobacco barges in one source, the attackers divided into two columns to attack the vessel on both sides. The owner of the sword, Master’s Mate Freeman is identified in the Confederate O.R. report as the second in command of boat Number 3, assigned to the Port column and commanded by Midshipman Minor, who was wounded in the action, and took command after Lt. Pelot was killed and the second in command rendered unconscious in the close fighting.

Although the ship had been on the alert and had its anti-boarding nets raised, the Confederate raiders rowed within close hailing distance before being challenged. They bought a little extra time by first identifying themselves as fleeing slaves, but then announced themselves as “Rebels!” as they closed with the Union gunboat, casting grappling hooks up into the raised boarding nets to climb aboard. Cutlasses and short swords then came in handy to cut through the boarding nets as well as in the hand-to-hand fighting. Lt. Price, CSN, second in command wrote the official report of the action and a later memoir: “In coming alongside, the enemy’s fire with small arms was quite severe; in fact it was during that time, and while the boarding netting, which was triced up, was being cut through, that the most of our loss in killed and wounded was sustained.” Another member of the party recalled, “Throwing our grappling hooks in the ship’s netting we climbed up. Using our guns and cutlasses, we cleared our way across the deck, where the fight had become general.”

The commander of the raid, Lt. Pelot, was first aboard and was immediately shot dead by the defenders. The Federal commander was wounded by a sword blow to the head. The fight lasted some ten or twenty minutes longer before the survivors of the crew surrendered. The Confederate attackers had suffered seven killed and seventeen wounded; the Federals lost two killed and fourteen wounded. The captured vessel ironically served the Confederates not. The rebs, not having pilot Dallas to guide them ran the ship aground. They then retrieved her and moved her to Savannah, and six months later burned her to avoid capture by Sherman.

The use of a short sword in this context is no surprise. M1832 short sword blades are virtually identical to the M1841 cutlass, and short swords have been recovered from the sunken USS Cairo and are on display in that museum. In addition, the monograph titled IRONY CLAD: THE REMARKABLE ODYSSEY OF THE USS WATER WITCH by Matthew Young Columbus State University states of the engagement that Paymaster “…Billings killed another two men before he was struck in the head with the base a short sword.” Billings’ journal is in the Library of Congress manuscript division. The engraved date of June 4, 1864 (the action was June 3rd) in the inscription is probably the actual date of the inscription: the raiders were back in Savannah that day and being celebrated as heroes.

A wonderful inscribed wartime artifact connected to a true swashbuckling navy boarding party. Accompanying this is a huge 3-ring binder weighing a couple pounds, chock full of research records, OR reports, articles etc… One of the most interesting battle known weapons I have owned. $8500.00 sold

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16-11-02 ..WONDERFULL ATTIC FINE CONDITION US MARTIALLY MARKED 3RD MODEL COLT DRAGOON... One of the best I have owned.     This is a relatively early Third Model Dragoon, w/ serial number 12602.    About 10,500 were made from 1851 to 1861, with numbering overlapping the Second Model and starting at about 10,200.  Very clear, correct “Address Saml. Colt New York City” barrel marking and sharp Colts Patent stamp at lower left of the frame with the proper “U.S.” centered beneath it indicating government ownership.   Clear “JH” inspector stamp on the forward left side of the frame and clear, matching serial numbers including the wedge.  . Smooth tan metal overall with good edges and a pleasant medium patina to the brass.   Grips excellent with just some minor dings and rounding of the bottom edges from handling.  There is a good "WAT" cartouche on the right grip, struck vertically, and a faint remnant of a cartouche on the left grip..  The cylinder serial number is crisp and the cylinder scene is quite visible (60%) … much better than most we see.    The cylinder motto is light on the “MO” of “MODEL U.S.MR.” but the rest of it is readily visible.  Mechanically perfect.  Colt dragoons are a key pistol in US arms collecting.  They are scarce in any condition, and this one ranks NRA VG+++ and sits in the top 10% of surviving specimens in terms of condition.    This is a darn fine US military example at a very realistic price.  You will look long and hard before finding another of these army issue “4-pounders” in this condition.   $7,850.00 sold

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16-11-03 ..RARE CUT-FOR-STOCK 3RD MODEL COLT DRAGOON... Extremely Scarce!  Only 1,200 to 1,500 Third Model Dragoons were cut for shoulder stocks so the bearer could use it as shoulder arm as well as a handgun.  Ours is serial number 18,170 and is cut for the third style stock,  having a four-screw frame,  notched recoil shield,  and a groove in the heel of the buttstock.  The metal is smooth with a mix of brighter silver gray and darker gray areas on the cylinder and frame, and even some mottled brown on the lower frame that is a remnant of case color.  The forward barrel and loading assembly shows a subdued mix of gray and brown. Matching numbers throughout. Sharps Colt markings on the top of the barrel, and folding leaf sight in place.  Clear Colts Patent frame markings, and even some decent cylinder scene remaining. Very tight wood-to-metal fit and excellent grips.  The trigger guard and butt strap show generous traces of rich silver plate .   Mechanics are fine and nipples are intact, not battered.   Don’t be fooled by the presence of two Dragoons on this list into thinking they are common.  I keep a constant lookout for them and they have never been easy to find.  I happened upon two in September, and here they are.   This one is really nice and presents a chance to catch a scarce variant cut for a shoulder stock.  $6950.00

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16-11-04 ...SUPERB HIGH QUALITY OFFICER’S PRESENTATION SWORD 72nd OHIO WITH SUPER HISTORY... Very fine staff and field officer’s sword presented by members of an infantry company to one of their own who had been commissioned, continued to serve in the company throughout the war and ended up as their commander. Unmarked, but likely a product of Henry Sauerbier, judging from the slightly down-turned pommel, the inset mother of pearl “Union” shield plaque, leather grip wrap, and the fine cloisonné enameling work on the scabbard mounts (see Thillmann for all these points.) The blade is a nice bright silver-gray with visible floral etching and a broad US with bulbous serifs. There are just the small of darker gray spots here and there. The brass hilt has an undisturbed aged patina. The leather wrap and triple wire binding are completely intact. The pommel cap has an inset mother of pearl cameo of a Roman soldier and the face of the pommel cap has an inset mother of pearl Union shield. The scabbard has pretty much all of its orginal blue, now turned to plum brown. The faces of the three brass scabbard mounts have enameled blue and white cloisonné bands imitating binding over vertical reeding.

Engraved in a beautiful period script on the upper mount is: “Presented to Lieut. J.F Harrington by the Members of Co. A 72nd OVI”.

Jonathan F. Harrington has quite a record of service with Company A of the 72nd Ohio. He enlisted at age 26 on 10/15/61 and was mustered into Company A as a corporal on 2/17/62. He then rose through the ranks to command the company by war’s end. He made First Sergeant 4/6/62; 2nd Lt. 1/1/63; 1st Lt. 4/9/63; and Captain 5/2/65. He mustered out at that rank 9/11/65 at Vicksburg. The regiment recruited from across the state from October, 1861, through February, 1862, and shipped out to Paducah, Kentucky. It was heavily engaged at Shiloh, where it lost 15 killed, 73 wounded and 46 missing. The regiment also took part in the siege of Corinth, the battle at Jackson, Mississippi, and the assaults and siege of Vicksburg. After reenlisting as a veteran organization, the regiment fought Forrest at Brice’s Cross-roads, where it lost heavily. After taking part in several expeditions, it fought at Nashville and saw its last combat at Spanish Fort, Alabama. This is a beautifully preserved, high grade sword presented to a fighting officer by the men he served beside and commanded. One of the nicest I have had in a while. $3,950.00 sold

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16-11-05 ...MANHATTAN 36 CALIBER NAVY REVOLVER: ... Despite the name, the Manhattan Firearms Company operated first in Connecticut and then in New Jersey. Capitalizing on the expiration of some of Colt’s patents in 1857, their revolvers bear a close resemblance to his pocket and navy revolvers,  and were well regarded in their own right and privately purchased by many Civil War officers as well as citizens.  About 78,000 of the Manhattan .36 caliber “Navy Type” revolvers were made between 1859 and 1868.  This is one of the Series III revolvers using the one-line Newark address and five-shot cylinder, serial numbered 38,160, well within the 30,000 Series III revolvers that Nutter estimated to have been produced between Sept. 1, 1861 and April 1, 1864, starting at about number 14,500.  The Manhattan markings on the top barrel flat are clear and the barrel shows lots of areas of faded blue.   The cylinder and recoil shield show some light pitting, but there are strong remnants of mottled case colors on the frame.  The brass has a pleasing medium patina and the wood grips are a tight fit to the metal and show just some abrasion and finish loss around the base of the butt.  This is a nice mid-war revolver that would fit well with a Civil War officer’s display or early western collection.   Ad tight solid Civil War revolver.  $795.00 sold

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16-11-06 ...FINE SOLID SECOND MODEL MAYNARD CARBINE SUPER BORE: ... SN 6590  Nice Second Model Maynard. Perhaps best known for his tape priming system, Dr. Edward Maynard also invented this breech loading carbine.  The First Models bear his patent priming system and a patch box.  These Second Models went back to basics, eliminating the patch box and overly-clever priming system in favor of conventional percussion caps.  Sometimes known as the Model 1863, some 20,202 of these carbines were made from 1863 to 1865, finding their way into the hands of the 11th Indiana and 11th Tennessee Cavalry, among others.  This one has strong remnants of barrel blue now turned plum-brown.  The frame shows silver gray with some mottling that is the remnant of case color.  The Maynard patent and Mass Arms Co. maker stamps are crisp, and there are two very legible cartouches in the wood. Mechanics are perfect.  Sling bar and ring are present.  Front and rear sight with sight leaves are in place.  The hammer shows some strong color.  Screw heads are not chewed up and show remnants of blue.  Butt plate shows plum brown. One of the key  Yankee carbines in a Civil War or cavalry collection. A very very good condition Maynard.  $1,450.00 sold

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16-11-07 ...SMOKING FINE CONDITION NEW MODEL REMINGTON ARMY REVOLVER: ... If you want to know what a Remington looked like when it was handed to the Yankee trooper this gun’s for you.  A deep, lustrous blue covers better than 95% of the barrel, frame, loading assembly, and cylinder.  There are just some lighter lines along the edges of the barrel flats and a light drag line around the cylinder.  The barrel address is crisp. The grips are excellent and have a tight fit to the metal.  This is one of the factory reissue guns which we see infrequently.  Note that the serial numbers on barrel and frame do not match   (69361) does not match the barrel number (73539).  Also note that the barrel serial is far less crisp than the frame, but is still covered in rich vivid factory blue.  The reason is that this gun was reassembled and resold by Remington out of two guns that failed and had been returned to the factory during the war.    This is a darn nice gun in screaming fine condition.  It ranks among the best condition examples I have owned.   $3,450.00 sold

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16-11-08 ...NICE COLT ARMY REVOLVER: ... The classic Civil War cavalry sidearm: the 1860 Colt .44 Army Revolver.  Produced from 1860 to 1873,  Colt turned out slightly more than 200,000 of these pistols, reaching serial number 156,000 by the end of 1865. Ours is numbered 35546 (matching throughout, including the wedge,) giving it an 1862 production date.  Smooth metal overall, in the bright, with some faint blue on the left and top of the barrel.  Crisp Colt barrel address, patent and caliber markings on the frame, and patent, patent date and serial number on the cylinder.  Some traces of the cylinder scene. Military inspector’s initials visible on the barrel.   Very good grips, with some color to the bottom of the butt strap. No cartouches remain.    One small “7” or “V” in the base of the butt.  Mechanically excellent.  Tight wood to metal fit.   Produced in time to see even the early major battles of the war, this revolver shows a small “2” under the serial number.  It would make a great companion to a cavalry saber,  and it is a darn nice example of the quintessential Civil War pistol used by both sides.   $1,495.00 sold

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16-11-09 ... FIRST PATTERN KENANSVILLE CAVALRY SABER: ... You have to hand it to Louis Froehlich for persistence. At the outbreak of the war he shifted from making buttons in Wilmington, NC, to making swords and edged weapons.  His partner stole his money,  his factory was closed for two months during a yellow fever epidemic, and then it burned to the ground.  Taking the message to heart, he moved to Kenansville and set up production there.   This is one of his “First Pattern Kenansville” cavalry sabers,  characterized by its smaller pommel and flat cast side bars, and in fact most likely made at Wilmington, before the move to Kenansville, but the terminology is too well established to argue about.    The grip is good and shows the original painted canvas wearing through at some points. The wire is a conventional twisted brass wire as opposed to frequently seen single strand wire.  The color to the brass is very good- showing a nice aged patina.  The knuckle guard and branches are intact,  with some waviness from wartime service.  No cracks or breaks.  The thumb piece is slightly downturned,  as is common on many sabers from both sides.  The blade has the correct narrow fuller along the back edge of the blade, starting forward of the ricasso and running about three-quarters of the blade length.  The point is good.  The edge shows some roughness, but the nicks are shallow and not too unsightly.  The metal shows an even silver gray, with some scattered dark gray spots.  This is a classic Johnny Reb cavalry saber that is recognizable across the room and would be a key piece in a Confederate cavalry collection.  $2,850.00 sold

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16-11-10 ...COLT POCKET REVOLVER WITH HOLSTER: ... Classic Civil War officer’s sidearm: a Colt pocket revolver with a 4 1/2-inch barrel in a spectacularly cool military flap belt holster. The holster really makes this set. Serial number 141939, giving it an 1858 date of manufacture. Clear barrel markings, crisp stagecoach scene on the cylinder. Fair amounts of silver left on the underside of the trigger guard. Good varnish on the grips with some minor darker dings. Barrel shows hints of blue faded to brown with some lightness along the lines of the barrel flats. The frame shows mostly silver gray on the right, but has some nice faded, mottled case on the left. The holster is a very solid, black harness leather with the toe plug in place and seams intact. The belt loop is in place on the reverse, showing some slight pinching at the top from being worn on a belt. The latch tab is in place and secure. We seldom find pocket Colts with holsters. $1,395.00 sold

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16-11-12 ...“BRAZILIAN” LIGHT MINIE RIFLE: ...One of the more attractive percussion rifles used during the American Civil War was  the “Brazilian” Light Minie Rifle manufactured by the O. P. Drissen  Company of Liège, Belgium.  This rifle was a unique combination of the features found on the British Pattern 1856/58/60 series of Enfield short rifles and the French Light Minié rifle.   This .577 caliber rifle was designed to accept a straight bladed saber bayonet,  and the guns imported by US purchasing agents are readily identifiable by the classic brass shield with an eagle on the wrist of the stock, now known to have been applied in Cincinnati.   The guns have the O.P. Drissen maker mark of a “D-anchor-C” on the lock and most of the metal parts:  I show it on the lock, butt plate, barrel band and trigger guard. (This same mark also appears on the obverse ricasso of the S & K saber bayonets made for use with the rifles.)   The US Government purchased around 6,000 of these rifles and the story goes that these Belgian made guns were part of a contract destined for the Brazilian military, but were bought by US agents instead.  This one has the bayonet stud and guide in place, also the bands, springs, swivels and rod, as well as both the front sight and long range rear ladder sight.  The metal is a mellow silver gray on the steel and iron, with some traces of mottled case on the hammer.  There is some minor corrosion around the nipple from firing.  The wood is good, but with a shallow divot out at the forward end of the lock plate, and an “HX” carved on the underside of the stock forward of the triggerguard.  The Liege “ELG” stamp is visible at the left breech and the brass components (triggerguard, screw washers and buttplate) have a mellow patina.   A very attractive Civil War import rifle.   I might have a bayonet for this that we can sell separately.   $1,250.00 sold

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16-11-13 ...EXCEPTIONAL AND SUPERB FLINTLOCK HARPERS FERRY MUSKET DATED 1820:... A very, very crisp 1816 pattern Type-1 US Harpers Ferry musket dated 1820.  This musket is truly Excellent approaching Mint condition.  Smooth, bright metal to the barrel and lock. Slight dusting of brown coming up on the lockplate.  Sharp “Harpers Ferry 1820” stamp behind the hammer and eagle/ US forward. Crisp matching barrel date.  Crisp barrel proofs.  Very sharp edges to the wood, which is a warm brown overall and shows sharp cartouches on the left flat. Bands, springs, swivels and rod in place. Mechanically excellent. This is one nice flint musket from the quintessential southern armory.  The pictures pretty much tell the story.  I challenge you to find one this nice at this price….  $3,600.00 sold

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16-11-14 ... BEAUTIFUL NEAR MINT CONDITION MODEL 1868 TRAPDOOR SPRINGFIELD: ... The lock plate on this rifle has wonderful case color and the wood has incredibly sharp edges.  Sharp 1863 Springfield with eagle lock markings and 1869/eagle head/crossed arrows/U.S. markings. The wood is spectacular with sharp edges and a beautiful medium brown tone.    Steel is in the bright as is proper, a little darker on the breech assembly.  Razor sharp cartouches in the wood on the offside.  Tight wood to metal fit. Serial number 10700 on the left barrel and receiver. Bands, swivels, cleaning rod and sights in place. Rear long range ladder and crossbar in place.  About 51,000 of these .50 caliber center-fire rifles were made from 1868 to 1872.   This one is among the best that survive.  Try and find a better one!  $1,695.00 sold

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16-11-15 ...SGT. CHAS. CUMMINGS BAG: ... British made World War One musette bag made by Dunhills Limited, London, 1919, with a British broad arrow stamp over a US indicating it was intended for US forces.  Nicely personalized with a painted light blue rectangle, bordered in black, with the soldier’s name and posting in black: Sgt. Chas. G. Cumming / Camp Hospital 33 / Breast France.  There is some chipping to the paint and the leather bottom to the bag has deteriorated, but the painted cartouche is a nice bit of personalization of an issue piece of doughboy equipment.  I thought it was cool…  $165.00

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16-11-16 ...IDENTIFIED SOLDIER’S POCKET BOOK... Small pocket book printed by the Presbyterian Board in Philadelphia. Pressed paper cover with blind stamped gilt title “The Soldier’s Pocket Book.” 1862 calendar on the inside. Contains advice, hymns, etc. for the new recruit. A soldier’s name in pencil, “Robert Greeley” on the title page. Troops from various states passed through Philadelphia on the way to war, but this may be Robert A. Greeley from Wayne County, Pa., who enlisted and mustered into Co. C of the 35th Pennsylvania on 5/13/61 and served with them until 5/31/64, when he transferred to the 191st Pa. Some minor staining and a little separation from the binding at the bottom. A nice piece of Civil War ephemera that was carried by many of the new recruits on their way into the field. $135.00

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16-11-17 ...UNION OFFICER’S EAGLE BELT PLATE WITH MATCHING KEEPER ... Nice officer’s private purchase 1851 pattern sword belt plate. This was the regulation belt plate (buckle) for sword belts, whether worn by officers or mounted troops, or NCOs.   Officers purchased their own plates on the commercial market.  The commercial die strikes, like this one,  were much nicer than the government issued examples.   The difference in quality is clear.  Ours retains its original keeper (hasp) with its matching bench number, numbered so to keep the two pieces together during final hand fitting and finishing. The tongue is the medium wide variety. Excellent on all fronts. ... age-160430 ... $265.00 sold

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16-11-18 ..CASED METROPOLITAN 36 CALIBER NAVY REVOLVER: ... Far rarer than a Colt and much more affordable.   The Metropolitan Arms Company made only 6,000 of these revolvers between 1864 and 1866 to take advantage of the gap in Colt production caused by the Colt factory fire.   Closely modeled on the Colt 1851 Navy, the Metropolitan Navy is also six shot and .36 caliber.   A secondary martial pistol, it was not the subject of Federal contracts, but made its way into the war by way of private purchases by officers and others.   This one is boxed in an original blue velvet lined dealer or factory casing with all dividers present and solid.  Present in the case is a capper, powder flask, bullet mold, nipple wrench – screw driver tool,  several round and conical bullets and several pistol size percussion caps.   The revolver has matching serial 2296 throughout, including the wedge.  The barrel assembly has about 90 percent coverage in thin factory blue with lighter edge lines. The balance of the steel is a subdued gun metal grey.  It has a very visible cylinder scene (99%), and some faint traces of faded case color on the lower part of the frame and hammer.   Mellow tone to the brass.  Tight wood to metal fit. Good finish to the grips, just a couple of handling marks and a little roughness to the finish at the upper right. Good mechanics and bore.  Nice undisturbed mellow patina to the brass capper and flask, with a couple very small dings to the latter. A good amount of blue left on the nipple wrench. Faded blue turned to brown on the mold with the handles more gray from handling. The case has good finish and comes with its key as well.   It has more value than the revolver itself.   A very nice Metropolitan nicely presented in the rare box casing.   $5,850.00

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16-11-19 ..NEAR FINE CONDITION 1876 WINCHESTER... Introduced during the nation’s centennial, the ’76 Winchester was intended to offer the shooter more powerful cartridges for big game and shows a larger frame than the 1873.   Some 63,871 were produced between 1876 and 1897, which makes it one of the scarcer varieties of Winchester for the collector.  Ours is serial number 49746 and is chambered for the .40-60 cartridge.   This is a very good looking Winchester with better than 50 percent deep blue on the magazine and round barrel mixing with plum,  shading just slightly on the barrel into a plum brown toward the breech.  Lots of strong blue on the forward part of the receiver and slightly thinner blue mixed with plum brown on the rear with just a little wear showing on the corners and edges of the panels.  Lever and hammer show traces of faded case.  Both sights are in place.  Excellent bore.  The wood is very good and fits tight to the metal. The brass has an undisturbed mellow patina. The screw heads show lots of blue and are not chewed up. The caliber, model designation, maker and patent stamps are clear and legible.  The sight ladder shows a little gray from use and there are some very light handling marks.  A very strong example of a classic He-Man,  American rifle.  $4,450.00 sold

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16-11-20 ..RARE SECOND MODEL BURNSIDE CARBINE ONE SERIAL NUMBER OFF FROM ONE WE SOLD EARLIER THIS YEAR!... Easily recognizable by its long barrel without a forend, the second model was manufactured from 1860 to 1862.  Only some 2,000 were made, but they saw wide service with the 1st Rhode Infantry, which fought at Bull Run, and with various cavalry units, including the 1st Maine, 1st New Jersey, 1st Pennsylvania and others. Matching serial number 464, indicating early manufacture since the numbers started at about 250 where the first model numbers left off.   We had serial 463 a few weeks ago and sold it to a friend out west.  (Maybe he needs this one too….  Consecutive numbers eh???)   Mechanically perfect with a good bore.  Both sights in place.  Sling bar and ring on the left with correct swivel in the butt stock  for alternative use of the leather sling with barrel collar.  Visible military cartouches in the wood.  Serial numbers, patent and manufacturing stamps are legible.  Some firing corrosion on the frame forward of the breech block, not uncommon from gas leakage from the Burnside cartridges that are front loaded in the breechblock.   Balance of the metal is smooth with a mixture of light and dark gray color, with some brown.  Two old vise marks at breech of barrel near receiver.  Some faded case color to the hammer and parts of the loading assembly.  Some blue left on the screw heads that have not been chewed up.  A scarce version of the Burnside that saw lots of use throughout the war.   $3,500.00 sold

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16-11-21 ...RARE ALLEN AND WHEELOCK CENTER HAMMER LIPFIRE ARMY... This is a scarce gun by any standards.  Only about 250 were made in the early 1860s.  Six shot, .44 caliber lip fire.  Considered a martial revolver though no contracts were let, this revolver preceded the percussion version and would have done very well but for Smith and Wesson shutting it down for patent infringement. Smooth silver/gray metal overall with varnished grips that are near excellent but for a small dark line on the right.   Matching serial number 160 on loading gate, cylinder, center pin.  Mechanically interesting ejector rod actuated by the trigger guard.   Allen & Wheelock patent markings clear on the left flat of the octagon section of the barrel just a little light at the lower left and far right.  100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect.    A very interesting Civil War pistol priced very softly at….  $2,250.00 sold

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16-11-22 ...1853 JOHN BROWN SLANT BREECH SHARPS CARBINE... Highly sought brass trimmed Sharps Model 1853 carbine, serial number 11974, made from 1854 to 1857 and known as the “John Brown Sharps” because Brown ordered cases of these rifles to arm his abolitionist forces.  Also known as Beecher’s Bibles because John Brown had his carbines shipped in crates falsely marked as Bibles.    Clear Sharps patent tang markings with serial number.  “Sharps Rifle / Manufg. Co./ Hartford, Conn.” barrel stamp is clear, but a little light in the third line.  Sharps 1852 patent stamp on the lock.   Long saddle bar on left with sling ring.  Overall very good condition.  Lock is a mix of deep gray and silver gray.  Barrel a mix of dull gray and brown.  Smooth metal.  Both sights in place. Good fit of wood to metal, just some tiny shrinkage around the receiver tang.   Stocks are good.  Soldier or owner’s initials “LKD” on left butt flat.  Brass band, butt plate and patch box in place with nice medium patina.   A classic Sharps carbine in solid condition showing just the right amount of wear.   A pre-war Sharps with likely wartime use as well.   One of the more historically significant models of American firearms…   $4,250.00 sold

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16-11-23 ..STRIKING HIGH FINISH ROGERS & SPENCER REVOLVER...  Investment grade, high finish,  NRA Excellent condition, Rogers & Spencer.   Has loads of original blue on the frame,  barrel and  cylinder.   Cylinder is half heavy blue and half uniform plum patina.  Slightly fading case colors on the loading assembly and hammer.  Some slight shifting from blue to plum brown on top of the frame, cylinder and left side of barrel.  Crisp markings on top of the frame. Matching serial numbers 4272.  Small sub inspector markings on the metal and wood.  Crisp inspector’s cartouche in the grips.  Grips very good with some minor dings on the bottom flat. The government contracted for 5,000 of these revolvers in November, 1864, and took delivery of some 1,500 before the war ended.  A very sharp looking revolver in spectacular condition.   Priced 25% below identical examples sold at James D. Julia and Rock Island auctions in recent years.  $2,950.00 sold

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16-11-24 .. EXTREMELY SCARCE ALLEN AND WHEELOCK SIDEHAMMER NAVY REVOLVER:..About 750 of these large frame revolvers were manufactured from 1858 to 1862. This is the standard production model with the desirable 8-inch barrel, and a variant marking using a “US” after “Mass.” in the top line of the barrel address and  Allen’s Dec. 15, 1857 patent date in the second line as well as his Jan. 13, 1857, and Sept. 7, 1858 dates.   Overall smooth gun metal gray patina and a crisp cylinder scene.  Very good condition grip with tight fit to the frame.  A little bit of light pitting to the top of the frame.  Good mechanics, including the hinged trigger guard that actuates the rammer.  I have always liked the side hammer revolvers.  They look like a step back,  but actually made it easier for gunsmithing.  Use of the trigger guard for the rammer mechanism is another nice example of Yankee ingenuity.  These have always been scarce.  This was once part of Paul Henry’s collection… the man who wrote the book on Allen & Wheelock.    $1,950.00

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16-11-25 .. COMPASS FROM THE SALEM REGATTA 1851... An impressive brass-cased naval compass.  American yacht racing was still a new sport in 1851.  It was also a landmark year:  in the British race around the Isle of Wight the US yacht America won handily, bringing home the elaborate prize cup afterward named the “America’s Cup.”  This round prize compass was awarded just weeks before that historic event as fifth prize to Capt. N. Barry and the yacht Quarantine, out of Boston, in the Salem Regatta on Aug. 8, 1851.  The identification and occasion of the prize are beautifully inscribed on the brass cover. This looks great displayed with an early naval telescope.  I find a reference to the yacht carrying some Boston city officials down to Nantucket for an outing and an 1874 record of its name change to “Welcome.” A great early nautical antique, beautifully inscribed…  $695.00 sold

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16-11-26 ...1863 DATED NORFOLK  MODEL 1861 CONTRACT RIFLE MUSKET:... Welch, Brown and Company of Norfolk, Connecticut, supplied about 18,000 of these rifle muskets on contract to the US government from 1862 to 1863.  This one has matching 1863 lock and barrel dates with sharp V/P/eaglehead barrel proofs.  The gun was carefully cleaned to bright some time ago, and shows clear dates, a sharp “U.S.” over “Norfolk” forward of the hammer, and an American eagle with some rubbing in the center.  The wood is good, showing a small divot out at the forward edge of the lockplate, and some rounding to the edges from use and minor handling marks, but remnants of the ink inspector’s cartouche on the offside. Mechanism and bore are good.  Sights, bands, springs, swivels and correct rod in place. Nipple not battered down.  These 1861 rifle musket, produced by contractors and at Springfield, is the most recognizable infantry arm of the war and holds a key place in any Civil War collection. This a darn good looking example for the money.   I found it cheap and am selling it cheap….  $1,250.00 sold

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16-11-27 ...SCARCE FOLDING BOWIE KNIFE CIRCA 1850 / SHEFFIELD KNIFE WITH AN IMPRESSIVE CLIP POINT: ... A fine large folder measuring over 9 ½ inches long when open.  German-silver mounted, bone handled, folding knife with an impressive swept-back clip point blade.  Raised floral motif on both sides of the butt cap.  Short crack on rear upper side of left slab near one of the pins.  Unpolished blade showing silver gray mixed with darker gray areas has been sharpened many times during its life showing some loss of metal.   The secondary blade is narrow with a slight pick point. The long clip point really makes this stand out in knife display.  Blade is signed  ??WAR SHEFFIELD.   Perfect to display with Gold Rush 1849 items, Civil War soldier effects, or cowboy accoutrements.   A darn cool old knife…  $650.00 sold

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16-11-28 .. Insignia A) Small Size US Staff Wreath for wear on the kepi. Measures just under two inches wide. Fine bullion embroidery on velvet with twisted wire edge. Has a raw back and was originally mounted on the front of a Union Officer's Cap. $295.00 Insignia B) Standard Size Officer's Eagle Side Plate for the Hardee Hat: Measures just over three inches tall. High Quality gilt bullion embroidery on velvet with standard twisted wire edge binding. Metal stiffener visible on the back. One attaching loop present, other gone. There were two of these at the October Gettysburg Show priced at over six hundred dollars each.... $435.00 sold

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16-11-29 ... HIGHLY DESIRABLE BRASS MOUNTED PATCH BOX NEW MODEL 1859 SHARPS CARBINE... A strong condition example of a very scarce Sharps.  The brass mounted 1859 New Model Sharps is not only a very attractive carbine, but one with a strong Confederate association.  Numbering of the series started in the 30,000 range and used brass mounts for the first 6,000 or so, including a brass patch box.   Georgia bought some 1,600 of these directly from Sharps and another 400 on the commercial market,  giving this gun a “one-in-three chance”  of having been carried by a Georgia trooper during the war.   This shows use but no abuse.  It is much better than most we see.   The manufacture and patent markings are clear with just a tad of rubbing on the barrel model designation and maker address.  The sling bar and ring are firmly in place.  There are some generous hints of case on both sides of the frame,  and the barrel is a beautiful thin plum brown patina.  Both sights are in place.  The front sight has had a hood added and there is a drilled hole in the receiver tang for an added lolly pop tang sight, which is not present. The previous owner said he gave that away to another collector who really wanted it.   This one did some precision shooting during its lifetime.    The mechanism and bore are excellent. The wood is tightly fitted to the metal.  The forearm shows some damage at left rear next to the receiver,  some scattered wear marks on the butt flats,  and a couple of light gouges on the upper left next to the butt plate.  The hammer shows some remnants of case.   One of the best looking Civil War carbines, a classic Sharps, and one with strong southern associations as well.   $4,650.00

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16-11-30 ...Civil War Navy Pistol Cartridge Box from Boston Navy Yard ... One of the rarest federal accoutrements is this USN cartridge box when found with the interior cap pouch still intact. The vast majority of these were altered immediately after the Civil War having the interior pouches removed. This one is an intact specimen in very good to fine condition. It is 100% complete including the six compartment tin liner. These were issued with Colt, Whitney, and Remington navy revolvers. It measures 5 1/2 inches wide and roughly 4 inches tall, and has the 2 1/2 inch belt loop. The outer flap is deeply embossed “USN” and it has the original latch tab still in place. Interior flap nicely marked "USNY BOSTON" Both side ears present. Very nice and very scarce ... $650.00 sold

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16-11-31 ..Extremely Scarce 1862 Dated Regulation US Navy Yard, New York, made and marked holster for the Colt navy revolver:  These open top and open bottom holsters were the issue holster on the belt rig for US Navy personnel and can be seen in contemporary photos.  They are more properly termed a scabbard rather than a holster.  This one bears the ultra desirable date of 1862. Belt loop intact, solid body and sharp markings. Some crackling and crazing overall, but with a good look. The sailor who used this cut a long notch out of the top edge forward of the holster, presumably to make it easier it draw his pistol. These were scarce forty years ago… now they are downright rare in decent shape. $595.00 sold

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16-11-32 ...Dahlgren Bowie Bayonet... One of the most highly sought of all Civil War knives / bayonets. This deadly edged weapon fit the iconic Whitney-Plymouth Navy Rifle. Overall VG to near fine condition. Complete with original brass mounted scabbard. Nicely marked with 1863 date and full Ames firm markings, as well as inspector's initials "DR" on the blade and also on the brass pommel cap. Blade is 12" in length ... handle is 4 1/2" for 16 1/2" total length...  whether hand held or mounted on the rifle this Bowie blade would scare the hell out of anyone.  I noted last week that one of these offered in a major auction looked for all the world to be a fake in the pictures.  It sold for over $3000.00 !!!(The same auction showed an obvious fake Civil War cap...  it sold for over $2000.00 !)Here is a dead-real example of a damn rare Civil War weapon... guaranteed forever....  $1,795.00 sold

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16-11-33 ... INCREDIBLY EFFECTIVE LIGHTED MAGNIFYING GLASS / PERFECT FOR INSPECTING ANTIQUES ... You have undoubtedly seen collectors at the shows running around with one of these magnifying glasses in their hand. There's a good reason ... they are SUPER! Months ago I bought one for myself and loved it. Then the local guys wanted one and I bought another half dozen for them at $25 each at the next show ... Then I bought another one for me when I arrived at a show and discovered I'd left mine at home. I figured with as many as I was buying at retail, I might as well buy them in bulk and sell them at he shows and on the web page. These are absolutely essential for anyone buying antiques at shows or auctions. The intense illumination from the twelve LED light sources and 2x magnification exposes "artificial age" such as cold-blue on metal or amber shellac on wood. Shine this light and you will see if someone has "aged" or repaired the item you wish to buy. The magnification accompanied by the intense illumination reveals cracks and repairs that the naked eye cannot pick up. Requires 3 AA batteries (not included) ... $25.00

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