Click here to see great civil war antiques we have sold in the past.Click here to see our current civil war web catalog.We buy antiques. Click here to learn about our antique purchasing.

Bayonets

Swords

CDVs

Miscellanea

Leather

Historical

Knives

Confederate

Hard Images

Guns

Ephemera

Uniforms

Welcome to our Civil War Antiques web catalog.

Please send all Checks and Money orders to :

Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

Click Here to E-mail Us!

 

LAYAWAYS ARE WELCOME:
Need to split your order into multiple payments? No problem! A simple 20% earnest money deposit will hold your item for you.
You can then pay it off in easy installments that fit your budget.
READ LAYAWAY TERMS HERE
~~~~~~~~~~
READ SHIPPING TERMS HERE
~~~~~~~~~~

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

 

 

 

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

 

17-01-00...NEAR MINT SPENCER CARBINE..... Among the best I have owned. Smokin’ M1860 Spencer carbine with 1867 Springfield upgrades. Beautiful, just slightly muted, “gasoline on water” swirling case color on the receiver and lockplate. Full, deep blue barrel color (95%) and rear sight color as well. Wood a nice medium brown with sharp edges, vivid inspector and sub-inspector cartouches at left wrist also near buttplate tang. Serial number 51,136 on wrist of receiver. Full firm marking present and showing wear from burnishing at Springfield. Nice case color on the breech block as well. These were Civil War model Spencers that were sent to Springfield after the war to be re-rifled and finished. 22-inch barrel, minty bore. This is a great late Civil War to early-Indian War cavalry carbine. This is as mint an example as you are likely to find anywhere with a price that won’t keep you up at night. Super in all respects. Bright bore. Crisp. We sold an 1865 model off the page in November in identical condition and same price. I gladly paid $4000 for it last month along with a dozen other great guns I bought out of a super collection… TOP SHELF $4,500.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

 

17-01-12... EXTREMELY RARE COLLEGE HILL STAFF AND FIELD SWORD: ... Without question one of the absolute rarest Confederate staff swords… likely less than 5 survive to this day. Pritchard, in Collecting the Confederacy, P.217, pictures what he says is the only known example. As is frequently the case with Vanity Press publications the author is in error… but the sword is indeed incredibly rare. It is likely the rarest CS production staff and field officer’s sword. College Hill Arsenal was only in business for about a year, but they made some wonderful swords. In this case they copied the design of the Horstmann US staff and field sword guard and modified it to produce their guard with a wonderful “CS” set amid the floral scrolls. The sword still exhibits other classic College Hill elements: plain pommel, large looped knuckle guard that joins the pommel prematurely,, angularly stopped fuller to the blade, etc. Overall length is 33 inches. Blade is 28+ inches. The blade etching is light but visible. It incorporates not only a CS flag showing just 12 stars, but an etched “CSA” as well. The blade is silver gray with scattered dark gray areas. There are some minor edge nicks, but not horrible. The only real defect is a chip out of the tip. This could be restored, but the sword is so darned rare I hardly see the point. The hilt shows a beautiful untouched patina to the brass. The leather grip wrap and twisted brass wire are superb and 100% original. This turned up in a pawn shop in Indiana last year and I was fortunate that the finder offered it to me. I found a European import scabbard that nicely fit the sword and matched the color and I have married it to this sword and include it here. I don’t often use the phrase “chance of a lifetime,” but I think that comes pretty close to summing up the case here. Outstanding CS sword of immeasurable rarity…. $8,950.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-02...SINGLE ACTION STARR ARMY REVOLVER... These long barrel, six-shot, single action .44 caliber revolvers took the place of Starr’s shorter, double action pistols. These “single-actions” were easier to maintain and the double actions did have a tendency to throw off one’s aim with the trigger pull. This one is number 27440, has crisp marks and even smooth gun metal grey patina mixed with extremely fine surface pitting. The action is crisp and the wood grips are excellent with a visible cartouche on the lower left grip. Starr started making these in 1863 and the majority went to the army, the government buying some 25,000 of them, making it one of the key cavalry arms of the war. A good example priced below comparable examples in the hands of my friends and competitors. $1,275.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863





17-01-03... EXCEEDINGLY RARE AMERICAN BRASS HANDLE BOWIE SIDE KNIFE / FINEST EXAMPLE WITH SHEATH & BELT FROG KNOWN! ... . Unknown maker, top shelf quality, several examples noted, perhaps less than 20. this specimen resides in the absolutely FINEST condition sheath and belt frog. This Civil War bowie knife was made for use as a side-knife and also as a detachable spearhead for a polearm. Incredibly rare! The brass hilt with knurled grip and hollow handle has a short stepped mortise. Long, elegant bowie blade with long, shallow, clipped point. Metal is very nice, smooth, no grinding or sharpening marks. A very elegant, sleek looking blade that reminds some of the so-called “Potts” style bowie, but which is in fact much rarer. One other point of comparison between the Potts and this style is that both were made with a dual function in mind- side knife and pole arm. I have seen a very few of these over the years, maybe five or six. One surfaced some years ago on eBay with a Vicksburg or Port Hudson capture label. Its’ current whereabouts are unknown to me. The scabbard is very well made, black leather and brass mounted with a round, ball tip on the drag and brass fastening button on the throat. This is mounted on a military belt frog of brownish black leather that was made specifically for it. The loop is short and square cut with the hole positioned just for this throat, and the belt loops are shorter than the larger frogs intended for saber bayonets and the like. Whether these were intended for arming troops with pikes or was intended for a colorbearer, to be affixed to a flag or guidon staff, is not known, but it is not a casual product. Someday more information will surface, but regardless of that this is, and will, remain a very, very rare Bowie knife. $3,500.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-04...WHITNEY NAVY REVOLVER... Whitney revolvers were well thought of because of their solid frame and durable construction. Whitney gave Colt a run for his money with this model. This is a nice example of the Whitney Second Model Navy, .36 caliber, six shots. The metal is smooth gun metal grey with good edges and legible markings. The barrel marking is good and the wood to metal fit is tight. Wood grips are very good with sharp edges. Barrel is secured with the characteristic Whitney wing nut. The serial number is M 9515 and shows the wedge type latch that Flayderman states came in around number 13,000 but, obviously this gun shows the feature started a bit earlier. No cylinder scene remaining. A bit of corrosion at the forward edge of the cylinder from firing, but nothing bad. A nice, solid, example of popular Civil War pistol both then and now. $1,150.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



17-01-05...1813 DATED BATTLE OF WATERLOO ERA FRENCH FLINTLOCK... French An’ XIII, “Year Thirteen” in the French Revolutionary calendar, cavalry pistol, more conventionally dated as the 1805 pattern. This pattern was manufactured through 1814 and was used to arm French cavalry, each trooper in theory being issued a pair that he kept in saddle holsters. (It was a respected enough pattern that the navy used a version as well.) This is a very good example with “M. An 13” (Model (of) Year 13) with an actual date of manufacture, 1813, stamped on the barrel at the breech. The lock clearly shows the Charleville Imperial manufactory stamp: “Manuf. Imple. de Charleville” and there are small inspector stamps on the brass and iron elements. There is scattered salt-and-peppering toward the breech, but the metal, like the wood, is generally very good overall. The rammer is a later French replacement, but these pistols remained in service for a long time. A very nice example of the pattern carried by Napoleon’s cavalry at the end of his rule and during the hundred days campaign that ended with cavalry charges at Waterloo. A very affordable REAL flintlock from the era of Napoleon Bonaparte. $1,150.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-06...REVOLUTIONARY WAR FRENCH 1763 PATTERN FLINTLOCK PISTOL / AMERICAN STOCK ?:  ... French 1763 cavalry pistol. .75 caliber. The lock and barrel markings are hard to make out, but the flat lock plate and hammer date it to 1773 or earlier and I think the lock plate may read “Ste. Etienne,” one of the three large French arsenals. There is an indecipherable 2 character stamp on the left breech. These pistols were imported into the US for the Revolution, and many remained here. This one shows definite signs of seeing service here as the wood is a restock from the period of use, and utilizes a screw to retain the large double barrel band. I have a hard time believing the French would have re-stocked it with a retaining screw through the band instead of their standard spring. My bet is that it is an American restock. Another bit of evidence to support my conjecture is that an iron side escutcheon plate was used. The rest of the original French brass furniture was retained. Overall the steel is gun metal gray, with scattered dark spots and a small bit of rust near the breech and touch hole. This is original flintlock configuration and proper for Revolutionary War through 1812. $1,750.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863


17-01-07... BEAUTIFULLY ENGRAVED PIN-FIRE SHOTGUN... Pinfires are not usually my thing, but I could not pass up this high grade shotgun when I had the chance to buy it. Beautifully executed floral engraving covers the back action lock and receiver. Even the hammers are chiseled to match. The recurved trigger guard and handrail pick up the scrolling movement of the engraved motifs, unifying the design of the whole gun. Butt stock in very good condition, with high, raised cheek rest. Sling swivels firmly in place. Barrels are muted pewter patina and plum brown showing striations of a Damascus twist. Small crack in the wrist to the left of the barrel tang. This is one elegant hunting weapon that would look superb on the wall. $775.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-08... COLLINS AND COMPANY WHITNEY NAVY RIFLE SABER BAYONET: ... Nicely marked Collins saber bayonet and full scabbard for the Whitneyville “Plymouth” navy rifle. Scabbard is black leather, very solid, with brass drag and throat in place. Throat has the small fastening button. Blade is excellent, showing mostly in the bright. Serial number 7770 stamped on the upper grip next to the groove. Whitney supplied about 10,000 of his 1861 navy rifles to the US government between 1861 and 1864. The guns were serial numbered and the bayonets show up numbered to match. A very nice example of the bayonet and an equally nice scabbard. You will have to look for some time to find another this good and this reasonable. An identical specimen brought $893 at Cowan’s in 2014. And another with the belt frog brought $1,093.00 in 2008. Here you go fair and square… $550.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863



17-01-09... GENUINE 9th ARMY CORPS BADGE... Very nice, original Civil War corps badge. In this day and age, where the market is plagued by replicas, fakes and impositions, it is nice to find an original Civil War corps badge now and again. Instituted in the Army of the Potomac early 1863, the idea for particular insignia for the different army corps eventually spread to other theatres. The 9th used the crossed cannon and anchor as a reminder of their early service under Burnside on the North Carolina coast. They eventually saw service in the west for a time, before returning east to serve in the bloodbath of the 1864 Virginia campaigns. This is a nice commercially made badge, hollow stamped, thin sheet silver, with the corps emblem of the shield holding a crossed cannon and anchor. I have one in my collection with the Michigan soldier’s name and regiment engraved around the flat edge border. This has a delicately pebbled backround surface and the original T-bar fastening pin and catch loop are in place. A legit badge that won’t keep you up at night wondering if you inadvertently joined the growing ranks of collectors of fake badges. $495.00sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-10... ENLISTED NAVY BELT... This is the 1862 pattern of seaman’s belt that replaced the old brass hook and standing loop design with a Goodyear patent friction buckle. These belts are very simple and very, very uncommon. They were made in buff and in bridle leather, as this one is. The belt has good color and is flexible, with some scattered wear spots from abrasion. There is one weak spot, shown in the photo, where the belt had been left in the buckle and partially cracked where the bar crossed it. This could be concealed pretty easily, but I have left it as found and it displays great in any case. Sailors wore these to carry cutlasses, pistols, cartridge pouches, etc. as part of landing parties, but also on gun crews in expectation of either boarding an enemy or being called upon to repel boarders. A scarce regulation Civil War navy accoutrement belt. $575.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863


17-01-11...MEXICAN WAR DRAGOON SABER BELT WITH NEW YORK PLATE... The 1840 pattern dragoon sabers were heavier than the earlier 1833 pattern and demanded a more substantial saber belt. The 1840 pattern was much heavier duty, using wider saber slings, fastened with simple, double-headed brass studs and a shoulder belt to help bear the weight. This one is still in its original, US regulation white, rather than being dyed black, as many were, to agree with later regulations. The shoulder belt is in place, which is a scarce item itself. There are two notches on the edge near one hook, but the strap is solid. Both white buff saber slings are present as well. The body of the belt is solid, with just some scattered age stains. D-rings and square ring are in place, secured by sewn tabs without rivets. Instead of having the stud back US oval buckle this one has the ultra desirable SNY plate for State of New York troops. A bridle leather safe was added as shown in the photo. The plate shows a medium dark patina, but with just minor, undisturbed edge wear and little oxidation to the reverse. The leather safe is mostly gone. The studs and fastening hook are still in place. The slings and shoulder strap each still retain a sliding tightener loop. A scarce pre-war dragoon belt. $1,495.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

 


17-01-13...MODEL 1863 SHARPS CARBINE... Very good Sharps New Model 1863, straight breech, iron furniture, no patchbox, serial number 93696. Some might say this is in the serial range of the 1st Mass Cavalry as numbers 93670 and 93733 were issued in 1864 to Co D 1st MVC. I say a miss is as good as a mile and I am adding no premium for the proximity of serial number. The steel is overall pleasant plum patina. Strong remnants of case color on the rear of the lockplate, hammer, and concealed portions of the breechblock and loading assembly. Just a few small spots of silver gray showing through on the barrel and rubbing to silver gray on the forward and high spots of the receiver on the right, somewhat more wear and less color on the left. Sharp markings in the metal on the lock, receiver and barrel, just a tad light on the right of the Sharps address forward of the rear sight. Vivid inspector cartouche on the offside wrist and initials under the rear of the forearm. Tight wood to metal fit. Very short hairline crack on underside of forearm from base through screw. Negligible. Sights, sling ring and bar present. Mechanically tight. A nice looking and very much better condition Sharps carbine than I usually see at shows. No need to go on about how important and popular a carbine these were- one of the essential arms in a Civil War or US martial arms collection. $2,450.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863


17-01-14... BEAUTIFUL  2-PIECE INTERLOCKING US EAGLE PLATE... These two-piece interlocking plates became popular around 1830 and hit their stride from about 1840-1850. This one has a nice, early-style long-necked American eagle spreading its wings, clutching arrows and olive branch, with a US shield on its chest surrounded by a circle of stars on a lined background. The wreath portion is nicely detailed and the floral motifs extend to the exposed portions of the belt loops. Best of all, the plate preserves loads of its original gilt finish on the plate, both tongue and wreath, and on the belt loops as well. This is a high-grade plate in excellent condition. $675.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

 

17-01-15...IRON FRAME WALCH 10-SHOT REVOLVER WITH HOLSTER... Rare, rare, rare pistol – and with its original holster, too! Winchester actually had a hand in these pistols: his New Haven Arms Company manufactured them for John Walch and J.P. Lindsay, who both had an interest in increasing a weapon’s firepower by using superimposed loads. Walch’s 1859 patent information shows up on the top barrel flat. The idea was to use five chambers with superposed double loads, each load with a corresponding nipple and cap. In other words each cylinder had two nipples. A split hammer the fell first on the right, firing the forward load in each chamber. Only about 1,500 of the brass frame versions of this revolver were made and possibly as few as 1,000 of the iron frame (no more than 1,500 at most.) This one in VG solid condition. The metal is smooth and shows strong grey and plum patina. The frame is largely an even dull silver. Nice grips with good fit to the metal, just a hair separation on the bottom from the butt strap at rear. Sharp barrel patent markings, a tad light at the beginning of “Firearms.” The holster is probably rarer than the gun. Black leather, butt to the rear configuration. Latch tab tucks through a cross strap. The gun was actually used and worn: the narrow, stitched belt loop pulled off during use and the owner simply cut two slits in the upper holster body to feed a belt through. Flayderman notes that an entire company of the 9th Michigan Infantry went off to the Civil War carrying these as side arms. I personally own one carried by a major in Custer’s Michigan Cavalry. A very rare pistol and outstanding tribute to mid-nineteenth century American imagination and engineering ability, if not good sense. I love this pistol. $3,650.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-16... LARGE PLANT ARMY REVOLVER... Much nicer than shown in these JPGs. The barrel has 60% vivid blue that the camera man didn’t capture. Very rare, iron frame version of the Third Model Plant “Army” revolver. Flayderman notes that of some 7,300 hundred third models, most were brass framed: “A few known with iron frames in the 6500 range; very rare; worth premium.” Plant used a cup-primed .42 caliber cartridge in these revolvers that loaded through the front of the cylinder in an attempt to get around the patents for bored-through cylinders controlled by Smith and Wesson. He also provided exchangeable cylinders that could fire standard percussion pistol cartridges. No government contracts are known, but they were popular sidearms. Frame shows a dull gray patina mixed with thin brown. Grips are very good, with a tight fit. Plant barrel address shows a bit soft at the edges in the strike. Merwin and Bray were the financiers and agents for these pistols. Their stamp on left barrel flat is crisper, though weak on the “M.” Serial number is 6569, in the proper range for this variant. Cylinder patent stamps are crisp. Mechanically very good. Ejection rod present. I see what seem to be two small forging flaws on the rear of the spur trigger housing and one on the bottom of the buttstrap. A very, very scarce variant of this popular pistol. $950.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863


17-01-17. New York Soldier's Inscribed Whiskey Flask ... Typical "traveler" size flask standing about six inches tall. Leather covered glass flask, with pewter bottom cup, is inscribed in period brown ink on the leather "Walter Merrick / 30th Regt. New York State / Vol. Co. "H" 1863". Merrick started the war in the 30th Regiment and was then transferred to the 21st New York Cavalry in 1863. He served in the 30th from June 1861 through June 1863. While with the 30th he fought at both battles of Bull Run, as well as South Mountain and Antietam ... as well as 14 other engagements. While serving with the 21st Cavalry regiment they fought at 118 engagements across Virginia and Maryland. Merrick was promoted to sergeant and first sergeant with the 21st cavalry. In early 1865 seven companies including Merrick's were sent to the Wild West, and trooped around Colorado in 1865 and 1866. Merrick was mustered out at Camp Collins, Colorado in 1866. A classic CW personal item, and very exciting with the inscribed soldier ID on the leather. If you'ld seen as much service as Merrick you'd take a pull too ... $365.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-18... EAGLE HEAD SWORD... A handsome eagle head saber in a brass mounted steel scabbard. A very elegant, early style hilt with langets at the guard, made by and marked “A. Werth Solingen” on the spine of the blade. The blade is etched with floral designs mixed with some martial flags and trophies. Sharkskin grip and wire binding are very good. Brass two-branch guard has langets on either side and a backstrap terminating in an eagle’s head. The blade shows a silver gray mixed with bright. Good edge and point. Scabbard shows dents near the drag, otherwise a silver gray with brass carrying rings and bands. The sword is very reminiscent of some Napoleonic light cavalry sabers. I don’t have my German sword makers book at hand, but my feeling is that this dates around 1840 maybe earlier. The motifs on the blade are relatively generic, so the sword would be a perfect candidate as a commercial export and many of our military goods dealers were of German extraction and imported their goods from makers back home. A nice looking eagle head. $950.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-19...INSCRIBED COLT POCKET CONNECTICUT SOLDIER WHO DIED IN 1863: ... Identified brown patina Colt pocket revolver with four inch barrel. All matching serial numbers 189268, including the wedge. Tight wood to metal fit. Pleasant, thin plum brown mixed with pewter gray on the left. On the right scattered shallow pitting on the barrel flat. Sharp barrel address and serial numbers. Pleasing patina on the frame: stronger on the left, but present on the right. Some traces of silver on the brass behind the hammer. Partial cylinder scene. Minor dings to the wood. Nicely engraved backstrap reading, “Wilbert H. Booth New Britain Ct. 1st Regt.” Booth was a New Haven resident when he enlisted in the 1st Connecticut on 4/20/61 and mustered in as a private on 4/23/61. The outfit was three-month unit and saw service guarding railroad lines, etc. and losing at least one man wounded in an ambush. They also participated in First Bull Run suffering six wounded and six missing according to CWData. Booth survived and returned home with the regiment, mustering out 7/31/61 at New Haven. Booth signed up again on 11/22/61, where his experience got him the corporal’s post in Co. H of the 12th Connecticut. The regiment was sent as part of Butler’s expedition against New Orleans and was one of the first Union regiments to enter that city. It thereafter participated in numerous expeditions and small actions at Bayou La Fourche, Bayou Teche, Pattersonville, Bisland, etc., as well as the siege of Port Hudson. During the latter campaign they suffered almost daily losses. The climate was not conducive to health among the New England troops and Booth died of disease 8/23/63, shortly after Port Hudson. To give an idea of the near constant activity of the unit, however, CWdata lists some 46 points at which they suffered some loss between the time of their enlistment and Booth’s death. This is a telling relic of the war and there is likely much more information to be developed on the soldier. $2,450.00

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863


17-01-20... EXTRA NICE CONDITION RACK-NUMBERED SECOND MODEL WHITNEY NAVY REVOLVER... The .36 caliber Whitney “Navy” revolver was well-thought of during the war. The use of a solid frame made it a strong competitor to Colt. About 33,000 were made, and better than half of the popular second model, which this is, went to the US army, navy, and various states. This one is serial number 4010, putting it pretty early in the Second Type range, which runs from 1200 to 13,000. This one also shows an engraved rack number “62” on the upper buttstrap, military ownership. Very even and pleasing thin blue-turning-plum brown on the barrel and faded case on the frame. Cylinder has generous roll engraved scene and blue/plum patina. Crisp “E. Whitney / N. Haven” barrel stamp. A number of shallow semicircular dings on the base of the butt. The wood has a tight fit to the metal. Intriguingly, the right side of the grip shows about twenty shallow notches filed along the back, The owner was a stone killer of something… rebs or snakes … your guess. This is a very nice looking Whitney, with rich remnants of blue finish and very attractive color. One of the better ones I’ve found recently. $1,650.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-21...W.H. SMITH CARTRIDGE BOX PLATE  NON-DUG... Very legible “W.H. SMITH / BROOKLYN” maker stamp in the solder fill between the standing loops. Mellow age patina to the face. A couple of minor areas of browning. One ding at upper right edge. Little oxidation to the back. Likely on a box till not long ago. Smith was a brass finisher who made large numbers of plates from 1861 at least through 1864. Cartridge box plates were ornamental, but also served the specific purpose of keeping the cartridge box flap down even if unlatched. Finding maker’s marked plates these days is tough, $325.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

 

17-01-22...W.H. SMITH CARTRIDGE BOX PLATE NON DUG... Another cartridge box plate as above. “W.H. SMITH / BROOKLYN” maker stamp in the solder fill between the standing loops, a tad light on the initials. Two edge dings upper left. Medium patina. Minor stains and oxidation to the back and loops. Finding maker’s marked plates these days is tough. $325.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863


17-01-23... EAGLE BREAST PLATE  NON DUG... Round eagle breast plate for the US army cartridge box sling. Mellow patina with some of the original gilt preserved in the low areas next to raised edges. Nice smooth back and loops in place with little oxidation. These plates originally were mounted on the bayonet cross belt and then migrated to the cartridge box sling when bayonets were shifted to waist belt carriage. They were very decorative, and reputedly made good targets, but remained in use throughout the war. A nice example of a regulation accoutrement plate. Top shelf condition. $225.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

17-01-24... SHARPS AND HANKINS CARBINE... Christian Sharps backed away from the company bearing his name in the mid-1850s, but remained interested in arms development. In 1862 he partnered with William Hankins to make four-barrel pistols and about 8,000 of these .52 Caliber breech loading carbines from 1862 to 1865, of which the lion’s share went to the military: the US Navy bought some 6,686. The leather covering on the barrel was meant to counteract the effects of salt water and sea air on metal. This one is serial number 8310 and is mechanically excellent with front and rear sights in place and full leather cover on the barrel. The leather shows lots of crackling and areas of finish loss. It is 90% present and even has some of the flap on the underside covering the front of the frame. Frame shows largely gray with mottled areas of faded case color. Screwheads are unmessed with and still show good amounts of blue. Stock rates very good with nice color, good fit to the metal and just scattered handling dings. Stamps are good and legible, though with some softness to the edges from wear to the die. Nice mellow patina to the brass butt plate. Swivel in place on the belly of the stock- the navy sling looped through this and had a cross strap/collar on the other end that buckled around the barrel. $1,250.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

 

17-01-25...POSTWAR G.A.R. ID TAG AND CIVIL WAR PERIOD WHISTLE... A nice G.A.R. veteran’s relic consisting of a Civil War period pewter whistle mounted on a loop with an identification tag made out to the veteran with his G.A.R. and wartime service information. The tag is a typical postwar stamped oval tag with a patriotic eagle motif. The text reads on one side: “J.C. Swasick / Perrysville/ Ashland Co. / Ohio” and on the other: “Zigler Post No 512 / G.A.R./ Co. G 65th O.V.I / Oct. 28. 1861 / Dec. 14. 1864” Swasick shows up also spelled Swassick in the records, which confirm the service dates on the tag, adding the note that he was 25 years old when he signed up and was discharged in Nashville. The regiment served in the Army of the Ohio, Army of the Cumberland, and then the combined Department and Army of Ohio and Cumberland, spending most of its service in the 14th, 21st, and 4th Army Corps. CWData lists 33 points at which they saw action and suffered casualties, including Stones River, Chickamauga, Resaca, Kennesaw, Spring Hill, Franklin and Nashville. They lost 8 officers and 114 men killed or mortally wounded during their service. The whistle obviously had some use in the veteran’s association. Whether it had some wartime memories for Swasick or his comrades is a story yet to be told. A neat and very personal memento. rpet $265.00 sold

Click Here to E-mail Us!

Call us @ 419-842-1863

 

Click Here to go back to the top.