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17-05-90 ... Artillery officer’s effects of Captain Thomas Hart Benton Correll, 1st US Colored Heavy Artillery, late 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry... I have owned many sets of officers’ material over the years, but not many sets related to the US Colored Troops. They were a somewhat special group. When it was decided to enlist black troops in the Union Army, the government gave them one benefit denied to volunteers early in the war: experienced officers. Notices went out to soldiers already in service inviting applications for commissions in the USCT. But it took a strong character to apply. Not only the troops themselves, but their white officers, were liable to be considered by Confederates part of a servile insurrection and if captured denied quarter, as more than a few were. Thomas H.B. Correll, serving in the 104th Ohio, was one of those who nevertheless applied and was selected for commission. Given Confederate hostility toward black troops and their officers, he must have been dedicated to the cause! Correll was 21 years old when he enlisted on 8/5/62 and mustered as a Corporal on 8/30/62 in Company B, 104th Ohio Volunteer Infantry, organized at Camp Massillon, Ohio, in Fall, 1862, to serve three years. During the period that Correll served in the unit they were stationed in Kentucky, seeing some action right off the bat at Fort Mitchell near Covington in September, 1862. For the remainder of the year and into the following Spring they remained in the state with other units to counter Confederate influence and keep it in the Union. A cursory search shows that Correll published a letter in the Bucyrus (Ohio) Journal, 5/1/63 datelined Crab Orchard, Kentucky, that might reveal more about his experiences, though we haven’t had time to obtain a copy. In summer, 1863, the regiment moved out to join Burnside’s forces in Tennessee and participated in the siege of Knoxville where they lost one man killed and several wounded. The regiment remained in the Knoxville area afterward and Correll was detached for duty with the Quartermaster Department 10/1/63 until Spring, 1864, when he decided to apply for a commission in one of the new black regiments being raised. He was successful and was discharged 3/23/64 to accept a promotion to Captain dated the same day in the 1st US Colored Heavy Artillery which was organizing in Knoxville. Correll was given command of Company D and remained with them for a year and a half, until his resignation 9/30/65. During this period they engaged in operations against Wheeler’s cavalry in August, 1864, and in various operations and expeditions from January to April, 1865, in northern Alabama, east Tennessee, southwestern Virginia, and western North Carolina. Correll preserved his officer’s frock coat, trousers, vest, sash, epaulets with their case and one shoulder strap. The frock is a standard line officer’s nine button coat with just one eagle-A button missing from each cuff and one off the back. It is in good solid condition with a couple of small moth nips near the cuffs and a couple on the body that have been closed up with a couple of stitches of thread. The lining is good, with just the expected signs of actual wear and use. As always the interior silk is a light green color. The vest is dark blue, in very good condition, with a roll-over collar and six of its nine small eagle-I buttons in place, (this vest being a carry over from his service in the infantry), three-pocket front, and its sizing belt and buckle present on the reverse. Correll’s dark blue trousers show the correct red piping on the seam for an officer of artillery, and have the absolutely correct belt tightener for officer’s trousers, horizontal pocket flaps and buttons for suspenders. As with the coat, there are just minor signs of real wear: a little abrasion along the piping and some mothing at the waistband above the right pocket. The red piping on the outside of each leg shows that for some reason the moths liked to nip at that red cloth but not the blue wool. Correll’s sash is the regulation officer’s sash with knots and tassels, maroon in color, with some minor fading along the top of the tassels. The epaulet case has some dings and dents, but the epaulets are nice: gold bullion with standard line officer’s fringe. There are no regimental or rank insignia on them, but he did keep one of his captain’s shoulder straps. This is a really nice looking set from an officer with some wide-ranging service and is a good example of a typical line officer’s uniform from the Civil War that looks great on display. It is also a reminder of the dramatic and complex social changes going on: the recruitment of black regiments to fight, and the appointment of white officers to command them. In this day and age finding a complete uniform is a rare event… and this one I obtained from a man who was given the uniform when he was a boy in the 1960s by his neighbors (Correll’s family) because the youngster liked “army stuff”. He kept the set four decades and sold it to me. Priced extremely fairly to you at… $7,950.00

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17-05-91 LARGE BORE .50 CALIBER - HYDE AND GOODRICH NEW ORLEANS SIGNED DERRINGER: (Generic Derringer w/ 2 r's as opposed to Henry Deringer w 1 r) 4.5 inch barrel. 8.5 inches overall. Hyde and Goodrich of New Orleans are about as southern as you can get, the partnership dating as early as 1816. They sold watches, jewelry, fancy goods, military goods, guns, pistols, etc., just about anything the well-heeled southern gentleman could demand, and what could be more necessary than a reliable large-bore Deringer style pistol for carrying in a coat pocket? This is a great example of a mid-1850s single shot percussion pistol made by Richard Hollis & Sons for the American market, imported and sold by Hyde and Goodrich, who have engraved their firm name on the top flat of the octagonal barrel. The pistol has checkered, bag shaped grips with german silver mounts, and floral engraving on the lockplate of the back action lock, and the breech and breech plug of the barrel. The breech has two inlaid gilt bands, the screwheads are engraved, and the lid to the small primer compartment in the butt has a geometric eight pointed starburst deeply engraved on it. The action is good. The barrel shows a lovely plum patina, untouched/ Some little crustiness around the base of the nipple, and a small crack above the lockplate screw on the offside. The hammer shows nice floral engraving matching the other elements of the gun. Nice tones to the wood. The ramrod is a replacement. A very classy ante-bellum civilian firearm by a noted southern firm. ybet bllmyr $2,850.00

sold

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17-05-37: IDENTIFIED TOLEDO OFFICER'S COLT POLICE REVOLVER 130th OHIO / JOHNSON'S ISLAND POW CAMP SERVICE AND BERMUDA HUNDRED... These streamlined .36 caliber pistols are pretty guns in their proportions and form. This one is nicely engraved on the butt strap with the Ohio soldier's name. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Overall VG condition. Metal is overall pewter grey patina with whispers of plum. The brass has a medium tone and shows some thin traces of its original silver plating here and there. The wood grips are excellent. The barrel address is crisp. The serial number is 8049 (matched) and the numbers, barrel address, patent stamp and caliber stamp are very legible. The underside of the butt shows some dings from tapping it on something, but the officer’s name, inscribed in script, is perfectly legible, “George P. Bristol.” Bristol enlisted right here in Toledo. He was 25 years-old and signed up on 5/2/64 and was mustered into Co. K of the 130th Ohio as First Lieutenant of Co. K on 5/31/64. This was a one-hundred day outfit consisting of men from the 1st Regiment and the 75th Battalion Ohio National Guard. It was the very first of the Ohio National Guard regiments to be mustered into service in the Civil War. Their first assignment was guarding Confederate prisoners at Johnson’s Island, just east of here off the shore of Lake Erie. On June 4, however, they were put on a train and sent to Washington, D.C., and from there sent by boat to join General Butler at Bermuda Hundred, where they became part of the Army of the James and encountered Rebs who were not POWs. They then took part in Grant’s campaign against Richmond and Petersburg. Butler first posted them at Point of Rocks, where their duty consisted mostly of picket duty and digging rifle pits. In late June they were sent to Deep Bottom, which placed them in closer proximity to the enemy. They escaped serious engagement and managed to return home, though not without loss- one officer and some twenty-two enlisted men succumbed to disease during their tour of duty, including one member of Co. F, who was captured at Whitehall, NC, and died in a Confederate POW camp. A nicely identified Colt Police in very good condition. $2,450.00 sold

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17-05-38..COLLINS SABER BAYONET ... Brass hilted saber bayonet made and marked by the Collins Company of Hartford, Connecticut, for the Whitneyville Pylmouth Navy Rifle. These .69 caliber rifles were developed by John Dahlgren for navy use.  They accept his scarce Bowie knife bayonet, as well as this long saber bayonet.  Long enough to "reach out and touch someone".  This one has the F.C.W. inspector mark of Frank C. Warner on top of the pommel and two serial numbers on the top of the grip next to the stud groove, one of which has been intentionally obliterated, obviously when the bayonet was reissued for rifle number 7154. The hilt is good with a mellow patina. Locking button functions. Markings are clear. Blade has a good edge and point and is silver mixed with gray spots in color overall.  An impressive example of a regulation US saber bayonet.  $235.00 sold

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17-05-39..TOP SHELF / NEAR FINE CONDITION M-1851 COLT NAVY REVOLVER...  This one is a pleasure to offer: a real tight collector’s gun.  Crisp edges, sharp markings, most of the cylinder scene is present.   Extra nice condition.    !00% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Steel is overall plum and grey patina.  There is a hint of case color on the frame and rammer.   This pistol has a wonderfully visible cylinder scene, a crisp barrel address and matching serial #s 147868, making it an 1863 gun. All numbers match except for the wedge.  The wood grips are excellent.  They have shallow dents near the top of each,  where someone apparently attached a shoulder stock at one time, leaving two light impressions on the tops of each grip.  It must have been a custom stock as this model was not "cut for" a Colt factory shoulder stock.   The brass has an attractive medium patina with just a hint here and there of the silvering.  There is a name or set of initials lightly scratched along the lower edge of the butt strap,  but I have not been able to decipher it and leave that to the next owner.   Navies this nice do not show up much any more,  and this one displays beautifully.  Proper for US or CSA weapons display.  Top Shelf.  $2,395.00 

sold

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17-05-40... MAYNARD SADDLE RING CAVALRY CARBINE ... This is the standard Second Model Maynard breech loading, percussion carbine, bearing serial number 21847. It has vivid inspector cartouches in the off-side wood at the wrist. Sights and sling bar and ring are present. Nipple is good and mechanics are fine. Maynard patent stamp and Massachusetts Arms Co. maker’s marks are crisp. Wood is good, with no chips or cracks ... just some surface abrasions. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Barrel shows a lot of blue oxidizing to a plum patina. Frame is largely silvery case color. The hammer, likewise, shows some color. This is a very good to near fine example of this Civil War carbine invented by Dr. Edward Maynard that used a brass cartridge with flanged, flat head drilled with an ignition hole in the center for the cap spark to pass through to ignite the powder charge. About 20,000 of these were manufactured starting in 1863 and were carried by cavalry units like the 9th Indiana, 11th Tennessee, and others. One of the standard US cavalry carbines of the Civil War. Superb bore. $1,395.00 sold

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17-05-41.... EARLY 1849 COLT POCKET WITH TWO LINE NY BARREL ADDRESS and FIVE INCH BARREL... The 1849 Colt pockets picked up in serial numbers where the baby dragoon left off and production commenced in 1850 at about number 12,000. Ours is numbered 38521 and dates to 1852, making it a very early example of this popular revolver, and quite possibly a California Gold Rush gun. The grips are excellent, with tight fit, no chips and just some minor scattered ticks from use. The barrel address is crisp and is the correct two-line New York address for this serial number. The serial numbers are crisp as well and the cylinder has not only a legible number, but a visible Colt’s Patent stamp as well, though not much remains of the stagecoach holdup scene. The mechanism is good and the nipples are not battered down. The metal is smooth overall, an even gun metal gray patina with brownish clouds hear and there. The brass has a nice medium patina. This is a nice early western pistol that was well cared for even during its working life and shows it. $850.00

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17-05-42... REGULATION 1850 FOOT OFFICER’S SWORD ... Regulation Model 1850 Foot Officer’s Sword and scabbard, with part of the original sword sling.  Mellow patina to the brass hilt, with a full sharkskin wrap showing just a few wear spots from wartime use.  The wire binding was the style with one large strand of twisted wire flanked by two smaller strands. The large strand is present, though a little loose at top.  The smaller, border wires are partially there.  The blade shows a mix of silver gray and darker gray, but with visible blade etchings showing the usual floral motifs, arms, national motto and large &;U.S.& The blade has a good edge and point. The scabbard is full length, black leather with brass mounts.  The leather shows tooled border lines and lots of finish.  There are a couple of flex marks and areas of abrasion that might be dressed up,  but it has a nice untouched look as it stands.  The blade shows a very legible “Horstmann / & Sons/ Philadelphia” firm name etched on one side just above the ricasso. A good example of the regulation sword carried by infantry lieutenants and captains in the front lines of combat during the war, and one sold by a major military goods supplier.  $795.00 sold

 

17-05-43   1860 STAFF AND FIELD OFFICER’S SWORD ... Introduced during the Civil War, many were carried by the big name generals.  Gen. John Reynolds was apparently carrying one when he was shot off his horse at Gettysburg.   They became the standard officer’s sword after the war,  and this one has typical postwar characteristics.  The maker, G.W. Simmons and Company was in business from 1835 to 1896.  Excellent steel scabbard, in the bright, with brass mounts.  Full leather grip and binding wire, half shell guard with a US eagle and trophy of arms.  The blade is very clean, with vivid etching showing floral motifs, arms, a “U.S.” and American eagle paralleling the one on the guard and pommel.  An excellent US regulation army officer’s sword dating from the Indian War through the Spanish American war and a key piece in a US sword collection.  $235.00 sold

 

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17-05-44... EARLY WAR SWORD BELT PLATE ... Regulation Union Civil War enlisted man’s sword belt plate. These were authorized in 1851 for use by enlisted men carrying swords.  This encompassed cavalrymen and light artillerymen,  and also some non-commissioned officers.  This is the early pattern, slightly narrower than the later war plate, and having a German silver wreath applied in three pieces. A good example of a regulation U.S. belt plate.  This one has the early war eagle and is likely an 1861-1862 example.  $285.00

sold

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17-05-45    REGULATION CIVIL WAR COLT ARMY HOLSTER BY GAYLORD... Regulation Civil War cavalry holster for the Colt Army .44 caliber pistol.  These also fit a Colt navy revolver just fine.    Very nice condition example of the standard military flap holster carrying the pistol "butt forward".   Very clear “Gaylord/ Chicopee / Mass” stamp on the reverse of the holster on the belt loop.  Nice finish, holster is not crushed down. Toe plug is in place.  Latch tab is original and in place and has a small repair on the back side not visible when displayed.  Otherwise the holster is untouched. Just a few minor abrasion marks to the surface here and there. Tight and solid.  Getting very scarce in this condition.  $675.00 sold

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17-05-46 P.S. JUSTICE PHILADELPHIA CAVALRY SABER... 1840 style US heavy cavalry saber by P.S. Justice of Philadelphia. Crisp markings at ricasso, clean blade in the bright with good edge and point. Mellow age patina to the brass guard. Original leather and wire with just slight rubbing to the leather. Blade bumper pad still in place below hilt. Scabbard is a mix of silver and gray with some brown spotting. Throat, drag and carrying rings are firmly in place. Federal cavalry carried a mix of 1840 and 1860 pattern sabers by various makers. Justice is one the better known military goods suppliers, and a big name in Philadelphia arms makers. His markings show up on bayonets, sabers and firearms. A nice example priced very friendly. $695.00

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17-05-47...EXTRA FINE MANHATTAN NAVY REVOLVER... Beautiful thin, translucent barrel blue, case colors on the frame, a vivid deep cylinder scene, and excellent grips make this an exceptional Manhattan. A Series III version, with single line barrel address, matching serial numbers 28,233. These revolvers resemble the Colt Navy and were intended to take advantage of the expiration of Colt’s master patents in 1857. This has a five shot, .36 caliber cylinder with panel scenes bordered by floral motifs filling the cylinder and crisp 1859 patent dates on rear of cylinder perimeter. Just two small rub spots to the upper left and right barrel flats finish mid-way along the barrel showing gray, but not contrasting sharply. The round, paneled cylinder scenes jump out at you at arms length. A very, very nice example that you will be hard-pressed to match. One of the best, and at a livable price. A Colt in this condition would bring double this amount, and this Manhattan is far rarer. $1,995.00 sold

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17-05-48...LARGE PATRIOTIC SHEFFIELD BOWIE KNIFE "FOOT LONG"... This large cutlery handle Sheffield Bowie measures 12 inches overall, with a 7 inch blade.  It has an impressive clip point, and a deeply stamped “U/STAR/S” on one side of the ricasso.  The blade was profusely etched with an American eagle, floral motifs, etc.  These markings are now light and the blade has shifted slightly to silver tone with gray spots, but the leading motto, “AMERICANS’ CHOICE” is still very legible at the left point, along with part of the Sheffield maker’s etched mark as well.  The knife is 100% as found.   Accompanying this is a wonderful replacement scabbard that the previous owner fashioned out of a silver plate antique serving tray of the period.  Pretty ingenious replacement.  $1,150.00

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17-05-49...U.S. ASTON PERCUSSION PISTOL... 1849 dated Model 1842 percussion pistol by Henry Aston. Lock markings are a bit light but legible: US over H. Aston forward of the hammer and Middtn/ Conn/ 1849 to the rear. Some rounding and slight chips to wood at rear of plate, other wood edges are good, with minor age dings here and there. Brass has mellow aged patina. Some dings to the butt cap. Some light pitting to the bolster. Barrel inspector marks light but visible. Barrel is mix of gray and brown spots. Sight, rammer assembly present and good. Action good. Nipple shows signs use but is not battered. A good example of the US regulation pistol for dragoons in the early Indian Wars. Many of these were in state arsenals at the beginning of the Civil War and are often recorded in early issues to southern volunteers. $750.00

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17-05-93...MEXICAN WAR DATED US H. ASTON PERCUSSION PISTOL w/ MATCHED DATES OF 1847...  Desirable, 1847, Mexican War, dated example of the US Model 1842 dragoon pistol by Aston.  Clear lock markings. Some corrosion from firing on the barrel top at breech that touches the last digit of the barrel date and some of the US/JH barrel proof mark. All markings are still legible.  Brass has a pleasing medium patina and the wood shows a warm and handsome deep brown color.  Slightly rounded edge to rear of the lock platform.  Barrel shows gray with some scattered light pitting.  Loading assembly about the same.    Mechanism is good. These pistols were made by Aston and by Johnson, with some supplied to the state of South Carolina by William Glaze.  They were intended to be carried by dragoons in pommel holsters, hence the swivel ramrod so that it would not get lost when loading on horseback.  Many were still in many state arsenals at the beginning of the war, with more than a few making their way into some early-war southern volunteer cavalry units. One of the few affordable US martial arms still readily available to the collector.  ...$850.00

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17-05-50...MODEL 1836 PISTOL BY JOHNSON DATED 1844 PERCUSSION CONVERSION... Outstanding condition arsenal style cone-in-barrel percussion conversion of a Model 1836 pistol by Robert Johnson.  These attractive, iron mounted pistols were intended to arm dragoons and were made by both Asa Waters and Robert Johnson from 1836 to 1844.  Ours is a very clean 1844 dated example by Johnson with clear lock markings and visible barrel inspector and proof marks.  The metal is smooth and bright. The wood has a tight fit to the metal, sharp edges, and crisp inspector cartouches on the offside.   There is some minimal peppering around the nipple from firing and a little bit of rubbing to the lock markings from the conversion process, which involved grinding the brass flash=pan flush to the plate. The action is good, sights are in place, and rammer assembly complete. Two small numbers stamped in the wood above the lockplate that are rack numbers or assembly numbers from the conversion process.  A very nice example of this classic American martial single shot pistol. Very affordable for a gun in this extra fine condition.  $1,150.00 sold

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