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Welcome to our Civil War Antiques web catalog. Please send all Checks and Money orders to :

Dave Taylor
P.O. Box 87
Sylvania, OH 43560

419-842-1863

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18-01-02... ALLEN AND WHEELOCK LONG BARREL SIDE HAMMER POCKET REVOLVER...  This A&W has a 3 ¾ inch barrel and is 7 ½ inches overall.  It is six shot and .32 rimfire.  The 1858 two-line patent stamp on the left flat is crisp and the July 3, 1860 stamp on the left frame forward of the cylinder is light, but legible.  The metal is a mix of dull silver and gray, with a little brown.  The metal is smooth overall with a few light dots on the right frame forward of the cylinder.  The cylinder is a bit dark, the scene is nicely visible.  The brass front sight is mortised, and the cylinder pin has a cylindrical head and latch below as seen on the .22 caliber versions.  The grips are excellent.  The barrel shows number 452, but these are batch numbers rather than serial numbers for the whole manufacturing run.  All original and mechanically fine. These are interesting pistols with lots of variations for the collector.  Comfortably affordable.   $525.00

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18-01-03... MODEL 1842 U.S. ASTON PERCUSSION PISTOL...  One of the great affordable antique US martial pistols available to collectors.   This is an 1849 dated Model 1842 percussion pistol by Henry Aston.  Lock markings are a bit light but legible:  US over H. Aston forward of the hammer and Middtn/ Conn/ 1849 to the rear.  Some rounding and slight chips to the wood at rear of the plate, other wood edges are good, with minor age dings here and there.  Brass has mellow aged patina. Some dings to the butt cap.  Some light pitting to the bolster.  Barrel inspector marks are light but visible. Barrel is a mix of gray and brown spots. Sight and rammer assembly are present and good. Action good. Nipple shows signs of use but is not battered.  A very good example of the US regulation pistol for dragoons on the Western frontier and Texas. Many of these were in state arsenals at the beginning of the Civil War and are often recorded in early issues to southern volunteers.  What else can we buy with such wonderful looks, great age,  and a solid connection to American frontier history for the inconsequential price of...  $650.00 Sold

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18-01-04....SMALL MILITARY PATTERN FLAP HOLSTER FOR ALLEN & WHEELOCK .32 CALIBER SIDE HAMMER REVOLVER:  A real smart little belt holster with full military style flap that is pierced for the brass closing finial.  Has a narrow belt loop secured with a rivet at the bottom. Nice finish to the leather,  tooled edge on the flap.  The edge of the flap has six decorative circular "punches"...  one of which was punched through.  Fits an Allen and Wheelock .32 caliber side hammer revolver with 3.5 inch barrel perfectly.  The holster is solid and the toe plug is in place.  The sewn seam shows a careful repair along the edge.   Perfect to display with officer's effects.  Darn scarce.  A heck of a lot rarer than the pistol.   $450.00

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18-01-05...1853 DATED BATTY “PEACE FLASK ...  America’s most handsome powder flask.  There are several different patterns of the peace flask, so called from the clasped hands motif, probably symbolizing more fidelity than peace per se.  Batty made two styles… one with triangular “rings” and one with circular rings.   This is an example of the latter pattern/  Attractive copper body with no significant dents or creases, and with intact seams.  Brass cap and adjustable spout charger clearly stamped “Batty” along with the date “1853” and inspector’s initials “ADK”.   Spring and thumbpiece operate fine.  Impressive embossed motif of a US eagle surmounting a pair of clasped hands inside an oval sunburst cartouche surrounded by 20 stars, all over a trophy of arms with a superimposed shield bearing a large “US.”  Slightly deeper bronze tone to one side of the flask than the other.  Both sides have an attractive mellow, aged patina.  Both of the correct second pattern round rings are present for mounting on a shoulder belt.   Overall fine condition,  A very attractive example of the die-sinker’s art, a key US accoutrement, and a handsome piece of masculine Americana for the collection or den wall. We sold an identical example last year dated 1857 and had several backup requests.  New year,  same old price...   $495.00 Sold

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18-01-06... 1857 DATED BATTY “PEACE FLASK"...  America’s most handsome powder flask.  There are several different patterns of the peace flask, so called from the clasped hands motif, probably symbolizing more fidelity than peace per se.  Copper body with no significant dents or creases, and with intact seams.  Brass cap and adjustable spout charger clearly stamped “Batty / Springfield Mass” along with the date “1857.”  Small US inspector’s marks present at well.  Spring and thumbpiece operate fine.  Impressive embossed motif of a US eagle surmounting a pair of clasped hands inside an oval sunburst cartouche surrounded by 20 stars, all over a trophy of arms with a superimposed shield bearing a large “US.”  Slightly deeper bronze tone to one side of the flask than the other, but both have an attractive mellow, aged patina. Both of the correct 1857 pattern round rings are present for mounting on a shoulder belt.   Overall fine condition,  A very attractive example of the die-sinker’s art in itself, and also a key US accoutrement. ... noco ... $495.00 Sold

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18-01-07...HONEST TO GOSH TEXAS WILD WEST CAVALRY AMMO CRATE... 1872 SPENCER CARBINE AMMUNITION CRATE FROM SAN ANTONIO ARSENAL:   The first one I have owned.   A real Custer era US Army cavalry ammo crate from Texas!   Standard grayish-olive drab army paint and white stenciling reading very clearly  on the the front: “SAN ANTONIO / ARSENAL / DEC. 9. 1872.  The lid is stenciled in white paint which is worn.  It appears to be the shipping information.  I can read "...KRISPEN"    One end of the box is stenciled “MODEL 1865 SPENCER CARBINE, MANUFACTURED BY SAGE AMMUNITION WORKS, MIDDLETOWN, CONN.”    Measures roughly 19 x 11 x 6 inches.  Neat early wild west artifact...   $1,250.00 Sold

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18-01-08...IDENTIFIED INSCRIBED 12th OHIO VOLUNTEER CAV. SPENCER CARBINE AND RELATED ITEMS:  ...  I tracked this set for quite a while.  It had been found by a fellow member of the Ohio Gun Collectors Association some years ago.  He told me he had it, and eventually I convinced him to sell it to me (at great cost).   It is a nice family archive centered on an identified Spencer carbine along with a few other items the family kept together.  The core item is the Spencer: a very good condition model 1860 carbine serial number 22392, giving it an approximate May, 1864, manufacture date.  The metal is smooth overall and the barrel has better than 90 percent old blue turned to a thin, plum brown. Lockplate and receiver show a mix of subdued gray and brown that blends well with the barrel and wood color.  Markings are legible and sharp,  just a bit rubbed on the patent date on top of the frame.  No pitting other than a slight trace on the shoulder of the buttplate.  Factory sub-inspector markings are clear.  Magazine tube draws freely.  Mechanism is good. Sights, bands, swivel, sling ring and bar all in place. Wood is very good with tight fit to the metal. Very old slight chip out at upper right rear of forearm. Minor dings and handling marks.  What makes this old Spencer so great is the presence of war period carving on the right butt flat identiftying the trooper and commemorating his service in the Civil War.  It reads:  “Wes Grubb / Co. A 12th O V Cav / War of 1861 [to] 65.”  This is incised in period script carving which has been highlighted with red sealing-wax.  Very very cool.   Wesley Grubb was 18 when he enlisted and mustered into Co. A of the 12th Ohio Cavalry on 10/23/63.  He was promoted corporal 11/1/1864 and served until mustered out on 11/14/65 at Nashville.  The regiment was formed in the Fall of 1863 and was assigned to the Army and Department of Ohio and the Department of the Cumberland and saw action in Kentucky, Alabama, Virginia, South Carolina and North Carolina, fighting against Morgan, and taking part in Stoneman’s great raid into North Carolina as part of Sherman’s campaign. They took substantial casualties at Mount Sterling, KY, and Saltville, VA, in particular. CWData lists 22 identified points at which they suffered losses as well as a couple of unidentified locations, losing a total of 50 men killed or mortally wounded, which is fairly high for a cavalry unit.  Along with the Spencer the family preserved a blue kepi cap that might be sold elsewhere as Civil War, but is clearly an 1870s or 1880s cap worn by Grubb while in the GAR.  (Before I saw the set in person I had visions of the cap being a wartime bummer cap.)   There is scattered mothing on the front and substantial dust. The flat, unbound visor is good and there is an intact chinstrap secured by two Civil War style eagle side buttons. The sweatband shows use and is about half there. The lining has a drawstring interior and has pulled up a bit, but seems mostly intact. The sweatband stiffener is about half there. Two small brass letters, “GA,”are on the center front of the cap,  it is missing the "R" for the full designation of "GAR".   Also present are two later 1800s hat devices: a set of crossed rifles denoting Company B of a 4th Infantry regiment, and a brass hat wreath.  One fastening loop remains on the rifles. The wreath as all four wires, but they are bent flat.  With this is a late 1800s six-draw telescope with wood barrel body measuring five inches closed and 14 inches opened to full length. Grubb lived until 1912 and was Senior Vice Commander of Leith Post 127 G.A.R. in Ohio.  A cavalryman to the end, Grubb kindly wrote an obituary for a horse that had served with him in the army.  The horse named “Frank,” was purchased at muster out and brought home by Abe Conger, the saddler of Company A.   Frank the horse was noted for his attendance at regimental reunions and visits to local bars in company with Conger.  When the equine died in 1886 local veterans interred him on the farm of a local former officer and inscribed a large boulder over him as a tombstone.   I show a postwar photo taken of Frank, complete with saber and a Spencer carbine hanging from his saddle. You can visit the horse grave to this day.    A superb historical grouping of associated family artifacts with a dead real inscribed / identified Spencer carbine.  One of the better cavalry weapons I have owned...    $5,500.00 Sold

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18-01-09... MOST FAIRLY PRICED POTTS BOWIE KNIFE & SCABBARD CURRENTLY FOR SALE... These magnificent unmarked bowie knives are believed by some to have been made by T.A Potts in New Orleans on the basis of one specimen marked “T.A. Potts New Orleans 1840.” Unfortunately, while that knife is real, the maker’s stamp is spurious in my opinion, added years ago to make it more saleable. Some now believe these “Potts” knives were actually made by Rees Fitzpatrick of Natchez, Mississippi.  Commonly held by collectors and arms scholars is the correct hypothesis that the knives were not bayonets at all, but rather made as dual purpose weapons...  a knife and a polearm spearhead.  The cast brass attaching rings are always unfinished on the inside and have no provision to actually fix it to a rifle barrel and keep it there, let alone in any one position.  It has been rumored that an example surfaced with an old capture note indicating it had been used as a detachable spear point on the staff of a battleflag, but I have not seen the documentation. It does make sense that the loops would be better adapted for a friction fit to a pole, whether for use as a flag finial or pike, but the definitive data has yet to be uncovered. In any event,  it is a dead real Confederate sidearm and a very stylish Bowie with swept back clip-point blade, and swept back brass attaching rings that accentuate the sleek profile.  The brass attaching rings are excellent, so is the grip, and the blade is factory bright, with excellent point and edge, no nicks, and just a few light scratches and some small gray spots near the guard.  The knife still has its scabbard, which is even rarer than the knife.  Brass throat and tip are in place.  The throat still has the fastening button and a small bottom piece of the belt loop that came up at an angle and fastened over it is still sewn to the scabbard edge lower down.  The leather scabbard is solid, but does have a seam opening on the back and overall shows finish loss and abrasions.  It has never been treated with any kind of leather dressing or preservative. Attic condition. A classic and handsome Confederate edgd weapon, in excellent condition, with its rare original scabbard.  For comparison pricing one sold at Julia's Auction for $4,312.00 in the Spring of 2005.  A very nice one is currently for sale on J&J Military Antiques for $3,495.00.  Horse Soldier in Gettysburg has a dandy priced at $3,995.00.  I paid $2250 for mine in a large pile of stuff....  I will be happy with a ten percent markup... $2,495.00     xzbbejxx Sold

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18-01-10...ROGERS AND SPENCER GUN TOOL... Two branch screwdriver and an integral nipple wrench. About 40 percent original blue with some crusty brown on the edges of screwdriver blades and smoother brown on the stem. A scarce tool.   I offered it last month at what I felt was a fair $250.00 but no one ordered it....  SO....  how's  $150.00

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18-01-11...PRESENTATION SWORD OF CAPT. DANIEL CHAMPLIN CO. H 26th REG. CONNECTICUT VOLUNTEERS:  The 26th Connecticut was a nine-month unit formed in the Fall of 1862.  It was particularly hard hit in the siege of Port Hudson. Setting sail from New York in December under sealed orders, the men only found out their destination was Louisiana once at sea.  Only after arriving a New Orleans were the men finally armed and drilled in the manual of arms.  After five months of drill and losses from disease, the regiment moved up to Port Hudson in May and as part of the 19th Corps took part in the grand assault, in which they lost 107 men.  In June they took part in the second attack in which they lost another 61 men out of 235 engaged. After the surrender of the post on July 8, the regiment did provost and guard duty before returning to Connecticut for muster out.  Daniel Champlin was from Stonington and enlisted on 9/2/62. He received a commission as Captain of Co. H dating to 11/10/62, and was mustered out 8/17/63 at Norwich.  His sword is a regulation 1850 foot officer’s sword with leather scabbard and fancy brass mounts that are ornamented with engraved American shields, floral motifs, and even an eagle with shield over a small “US” on the drag. On the top section of the upper mount is engraved in script: “Presented to / Capt. Daniel Champlin / by his Company Sept. 30th 1862. / Co. H 26th Reg. C.V.M.”    Interestingly, the regimental history notes specifically that company officers were “elected by each company after its enlistment, before they were commissioned.”  Nothing goes smoothly in the army, however, and although mustered into service on 9/25/62, the muster rolls were not signed and the regiment had to be mustered in again on November 10th and 12th, hence the later date of Champlin’s official commission.  The leather scabbard is very good, with no bends or breaks, just some usual checking to the finish from age.  The scabbard mounts match the patina of the hilt in a very warm medium tone. The drag has an ancient brass rivet on the obverse securing it in place due to the loss of the retaining screw on the reverse side.  The top two mounts have their original retaining screws.  The grip is also very good, with full sharkskin wrap and triple wire binding, and just some minor wear spots to the surface of the wrap. The blade retains the leather washer at its shoulder under the guard. The etching is visible, though not bright, being mostly a mix of silver gray and darker gray.  Has a good edge and point with no nicks.  The etched motifs are the usual mix of floral and patriotic elements.  A very handsome combat officer's sword carried in Louisiana, and priced comfortably at....  $2,650.00 Sold

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18-01-12... FANCY PANTS HIGH QUALITY PERCUSSION RIFLE OR SHOTGUN TOOL ... Fancy T-shaped gun tool in steel and brass. The upright steel center bar is a nipple wrench at the bottom. The top of this bar has a removable nipple pick (vent pick) which may also have doubled as an oiler. The ends of the cross arm of the "T" have removable brass caps which expose compartments for an extra nipple in each end. Truly a great antique gun item. Muted age patina to the brass and mixed plum brown and dull silver to the body. Probably from a very high end cased rifle or shotgun of the 1830s or 1840s. One of my favorite "smalls" recently discovered... $235.00

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18-01-13...CASED EPAULETS FOR A FIRST LIEUTENANT OF THE 6th INFANTRY ... Original fine condition Civil War epaulets for the dress uniform of a 1st Lieutenant assigned to a 6th regiment of infantry. He could have been with the regular army or any one of the state units. The case is the standard tinned and lacquered iron tole with a folding wire handle on top and simple latch on one side, with an interior hinged compartment that supports the epaulets when cased and could contain other insignia or fittings. The epaulets are regulation gold bullion with the medium width fringe indicating a line officer, and small silver bars indicating a first lieutenant on each. On the round pad section of each is a bullion rondel with medium blue center on which is embroidered a bullion “6.” There is some wear to the bullion and one little bit of mothing to the blue inside the loop of one numeral. One crescent has a slight dent and the other shows a small rectangular stain that might clean. The undersides are good, with the red and maroon silk lining largely intact and the “left” and “right” marked locking bars in place. The locking studs have staff officer button tops, so we might be looking at a pair of regimental adjutant (or other staff member) epaulets. A really fine set that could complete an officer’s uniform, or be displayed as a stand alone artifact. $595.00

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