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18-08-01...Louisiana Confederate Soldier’s Testament w/ Magnificent Presentation Label:  A wonderfully visual display item.  As you can see the Testament was given by a Louisiana lady of obvious Confederate loyalties, to a soldier named Moses Speck in the 33rd Louisiana Regiment.  I will give data on the unit below.  I can find no roster for the 33rd and assume those Confederate records are lost to the ages.  Interestingly --- penciled on the next page is the name William McCra?  The data page shows Louisiana soldiers with the last name McCrary  McCraw McCronklin and McCrory.   I believe the name written on the page is McCraw, and this name does show up in Louisiana records.   William McCraw was a corporal in the 19th Louisiana which like the 33rd was part of Mouton’s Brigade in 1862.  The Testament is tight and solid.  Has a 20th century repair to the spine.  Like most Confederate Testaments this one was published in Oxford,  England and run through the blockade.  It bears an 1862 date on the title page. 

Following is information gleaned from www.louisianacivilwar.org

General Alfred Mouton's Brigade consisted of, off-and-on, of the following regiments: 18th Louisiana, 24th Louisiana and 28th Louisiana. Unit names common to see in the history of Mouton's Brigade were the following: 10th Louisiana Battalion (Yellow Jacket Battalion), 11th Louisiana Battalion, 12th Louisiana Battalion (Confederate Guards Response Battalion), and 33rd Louisiana Regiment. Also, you will come across the Consolidated 18th Regiment and Yellow Jacket Battalion and the Consolidated Crescent Regiment. This is very confusing and I'll attempt to break down this confusing set up for you and track the progression of Mouton's Brigade. 

When Mouton returned to duty his command included the 18th Regiment, newly reformed 24th Regiment and the newly created 33rd Louisiana Regiment. The 33rd Regiment "enjoyed" an extremely brief life. It was created on October 10th 1862 near Donaldsonville. It was created by the consolidation of the 10th Louisiana Battalion and 12th Louisiana Battalion. It fought in one battle, Battle of Georgia Landing, and appears to have conducted itself unfavorably. There were problems between the two units consolidating into one regiment and on November 23rd Taylor disbanded the regiment back into its two distintive battalions. The battalions, though, are of special interest to the history of Mouton's Brigade. 

The 12th Louisiana Battalion is also known as Clack's Battalion and the Confederate Guards Response Battalion. This unit was originally organized in New Orleans as the Confederate Guards Response Battalion. It formed in March of 1862 for 90 Days with two companies. It served in the Army of the Mississippi, fought at Shiloh, served in the Siege of Corinth and disbanded at Tupelo at the end of its service (July). It reorganized itself at New Iberia in August, with a third company added soon afterwards. After its brief role in the 33rd Louisiana it remained an independent Battalion, fighting in the Battles of Irish Bend and Bayou Fordoche. When the army returned to south Louisiana, Clack's Battalion was attached to Mouton's Brigade in August. 

The other battalion used to create the 33rd Regiment was the 10th Louisiana Battalion or better known as the Yellow Jacket Battalion. This battalion was formed in St. Martinville in April of 1862 under the command of Antoine Fournet and thus it was commonly known as Fournet's Battalion. It operated in South Louisiana during late 1862 and was merged with the 12th Battalion in October to form the 33rd Regiment. After the break up of that regiment the battalion fought at Bisland and Irish Bend. Although it operated with the army during 1863 a large percentage of the regiment deserted when the army left the Teche Region. It was mounted and hunted Jayhawkers through the Summer. Once the battalion reconstituted itself at Vermillionville it joined Mouton's Brigade in September of 1863. 

Wonderful Confederate Personal Item…   $1,295.00 Sold

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18-08-02... SCARCE TYPE-3 HARPERS FERRY MISSISSIPPI RIFLE WITH LONG RANGE REAR SIGHT AND BAYONET LUG AND MATCHED 1851 DATES ON LOCK AND BARREL... This gun is categorized as a Type III alteration by George Moller in American Military Shoulder Arms. They were produced at Harpers Ferry during 1856, 1857, 1858 and 1859. They utilized the newly adopted US M-1855 rifle pattern long-range rear sight and the M-1855 rifle saber bayonet lug. The front bbl band was arsenal altered so that it could be removed over the arsenal added bayonet lug. Moller notes that some of the 1,050 rifles altered in fiscal year 1856 were of this configuration and remained in .54 caliber. Of the 945 altered in fiscal year 1857, 803 were re-bored to .58 and the remaining 142 were left in their original .54 caliber. Of the 1,663 rifles altered in fiscal year 1858, it is believed that all of the guns were left in their original .54 caliber. Of the 1,904 rifles altered in fiscal year 1859, 1,062 were re-bored to .58 and the remaining 842 were left in their original .54 caliber. This one is original .54 caliber, 33” bbl. Lockplate is dated “1851” and the bbl tang is also dated “1851”. Nice to have them matched as most of these type 3's were assembled at the arsenal with mismatched dates. It has the correct Harpers Ferry improved steel ramrod which is recessed for the mini- ball. Breech of barrel has “W W / P” and " V P " over eagle head proof marks. Capital letter "R” is stamped inside the patchbox (inspector's initial). Spare nipple remains in the patchbox, and it has the three router tip marks in the patchbox which are found ONLY on Harpers Ferry stocks. Overall NRA "VG++" condition. Nice steel grey patina on lock and barrel. No pitting. Crisp markings. Brass furniture has a pleasant mellow patina. Wood is VG with nice edges and only a few dents and scratches. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. $3,450.00 sold

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18-08-03...FIRST YEAR OF PRODUCTION WHITNEY CONTRACT MISSISSIPPI RIFLE / MATCHED 1848 DATES: This US M1841 rifle was produced under government contract by the Eli Whitney arms factory of New Haven, Connecticut. It is one of 15,000 Mississippi rifles produced by Whitney from 1848 to 1853. It is in original .54 caliber,with the proper 33” round barrel. Barrel is steel grey patina. The bore is excellent. Barrel tang has a very faint, but visible date of 1848. (The "48" is clear. The "18" is about gone.) Barrel has the proper brass blade front sight and notched rear sight. Breech is stamped with “US’ over “S.K.” over “VP”, and also "STEEL". Lockplate has a matching steel grey patina with clear marking “E. WHITNEY / US” forward of the hammer. Rear of hammer bears the two-line stamping “N. HAVEN / 1848.” Nipple is original and action works well. The stock is fitted with all the proper brass furniture including a brass patchbox. All brass displays a light patina. The stock has good edges and both visible inspector's cartouches on the left flat, opposite the lock. One is clearly WAT (Wm. A. Thornton). Buttplate retains the “US” on the tang. Correct brass tipped steel ramrod is present. Overall NRA "very good++" condition. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect. Compare with an identical example dated 1853 sold by my friends Wes and Sam at The Horse Soldier in Gettysburg for $3,250.00. My extra friendly Ohio price.... xbajjz $2,450.00 sold

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18-08-04...18-05-62 3 WAR OF 1812 ERA WAIST BELT PLATES ..See O’Donnell and Campbell for some of the background on these plates. They tend to date roughly 1818 to 1835, but some patterns extend a few years on either side of that. This was a widely used plate in the “elegant elite,” the volunteer militia who formed their own uniformed companies and were a prominent and elegant part of the social scene in the early 19th century United States. Every adult male, with some exemptions, was part of the enrolled militia and expected to show up at regular musters with basic equipment. Volunteer companies, however, supplied their own arms, gear, and uniforms, competing with one another not just on the drill field but in parades, musters, fancy balls and cotillions. Fortunately for collectors, early militia material is a combination of history and art.

A) Our first plate is slightly rectangular and likely dates 1825-1835. See O&C plate 167. The arc over the eagle consists of 17 stars and the eagle with shield is based on the army’s 1821 pattern hat plate. This is very nicely detailed, has the tongue, bar, and one of the floating prongs on the bar on the reverse. Very attractive, fine condition with a slight bend in the bar on the back. A very handsome early American military belt plate. $495.00 sold

B) Our second example is of the more typical square shape of the 1818-1835 period and bears an American eagle superimposed on a trophy of arms of the same general design as cap plates from the 1814-1821 era. See O&C plates 152-157. This one has great color on the face and sharp detail. The back shows blackening to the ancient lacquer finish and is missing the attaching hook. The bar is flat which is an early feature. This is a very showy piece and pre 1820 in age. $395.00 sold

C) Our third plate is another of the square style in the same design as item "B" above. This one, too, shows wonderful detail and is a fine example of a different die-sinker’s skill. The patina is a very pretty dark, undisturbed neutral brass. The slight traces of silver on the face and more on the reverse show that it was once silvered to indicate the wearer’s service in the infantry or dragoons. The tongue and bar are present on the reverse. Another very good example of an early US military belt plate. $475.00 sold

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18-08-05... 1923 SILVER CERTIFICATE ...A very fine example of the large size 1923 series US one-dollar (7.5in x 3in)  bill that entitled the bearer to a silver dollar in exchange.   These were issued from 1878 and the 1923 series was the last of the large size.  Those following were the smaller size bills we are used to. The privilege of exchanging these for silver was withdrawn in the 1960s, but they remain a nice example of engraving and a basic piece in collecting US currency.  I bought it at an old fashioned auction sale because it was so nice and I thought it was neat and figured someone else would agree.  Internet research shows these notes in this condition are priced in the $150 to $200 range by coin and currency specialists, with an odd exception of The Littleton Coin Company pricing theirs at $595.00 each and no condition grade assigned. (zeez)  Perfect to display with your Thompson sub-machine gun and an old bootleg whiskey bottle if you have such things.    I think this is a real fair deal at ....   $115.00 sold

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18-08-06....WAR OF 1812 ERA EAGLE WAIST BELT AND PLATE ... Waist belts of this period in nice condition are very tough to come by.  The plates were attractive  enough to be saved by the wearer or his family, but the leather was often tossed aside.  This belt is solid and supple and retains its shoulder support belt that is adjusted by its own small buckle.  Both shoulder belt and waist belt are an attractive light, reddish brown color.    The belt is full length and shows how the fitting of these plates differed from later US military belts, with the plate itself having prongs on a bar on the reverse that would fit two rows of adjusting holes on the belt.  The plate also had the tongue which fitted the hasp fixed in place on the other end of the waist belt. There may have been sword slings originally fitted along the bottom edge of the waist belt, but I don't see any signs of stitching for them, so it may have been an accoutrement belt.   The plate is the showy, square eagle belt plate that came in around 1815, but saw its heyday after 1818. There is a very small ding on the plate just above ribband on the left that shows some verdigris and some light verdigris on the reverse that could be cleaned.  A very good looking belt rig that would dress up a militia or early US military display.  Priced cheaper than a factory made Civil War belt ...  $750.00

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18-08-07...9th PLATE AMBROTYPE ARMED SOLDIER ... A Union soldier has visited the studio of a photographic artist to have his likeness taken.  He has not bothered to dress up much.  He wears the regulation four button fatigue blouse and forage cap and stares directly into the camera lens.   He holds a musket with fixed bayonet at his side to emphasize his new role as soldier.    The view is mid-thigh up, a tad dark below the waist, but enough to show his uniform and determination to preserve the Union to the folks back home. Housed in its original leatherette case with glass, mat and frame, lacking the hinged cover, size 2.5in x 2in,. $145.00 sold

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18-08-08...CDV OF GENERAL RICHARD W. JOHNSON:  An unsung hero who is seldom found in photos.  Clear, vignette bust-view showing the edges of his shoulder straps and the upper pair of buttons on each side of his double-breasted frock coat indicating his rank of brigadier general. No backmark. Period ink identification at bottom, “RW Johnson / Brig. General.” I do not know for sure if this is his signature, but I would bet it is.  Johnson, born in Kentucky in 1827, was West Point Class of 1849.  He served on the frontier with the 6th and the 1st US infantry and then with the newly formed 2nd US Cavalry starting 1855.   Made a brigadier general in October 1861, he served in McCook’s Division in the Army of the Ohio, was defeated and captured by John Hunt Morgan in summer 1862, but returned to command a division in the Army of the Cumberland and saw action at Stones River, Chickamauga, Chattanooga and the Atlanta Campaign, where he was wounded at New Hope Church. He returned to head the cavalry of the Military Division of the Mississippi and lead the it at the Battle of Nashville. He received numerous brevets for gallant and meritorious service at Chickamauga, Chattanooga, Nashville, etc., including advancement to brevet major general in the US service. His wounds forced his retirement in 1867, but he had a postwar career as a teacher and writer, including his own reminiscences and recollections of General Thomas. $250.00 sold

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18-08-09... CDV OF EDWARD BRENNAN 105th AND 94th NEW YORK WITH INTERESTING NOTES ON THE BACK WOUNDED AT FREDERICKSBURG: A veteran who had had enough. The 105th New York suffered heavy losses at Second Bull Run (89 killed, wounded and missing,) Antietam (74) and Fredericksburg (78.) In May 1863 it was understrength, and was consolidated into five companies and combined with the 94th NY. Brennan is shown in a knees-up studio view in his enlisted frock coat, one hand on photographer’s column and the other, Napoleonically, in his lower breast. The CDV has a Holmes New York backmark. A comrade, hospital ward mate or nurse has annotated the reverse, but got his first name wrong: “Michal Brenan / co. H 94th Regt. NYSV” in bold brown ink, followed by a correction, “I mean Edward Brenen now in us general hospital Ward I (?) With copl. James Newton he has bin sick but he looks well now. I sent the bag that the likeness was in but you did not send it back” The NY rosters include two John Brennans who served in the 105th NY and transferred into the 94th, both into Co. F. The pension card index straightens it out: John Brennan of Co. I 105th NY also served in Co. H of the 94th NY, just as the inscription indicates. Company F seems to have been a temporary assignment on consolidation. He was 19 years-old when he enlisted at Rochester on 11/11/1861 as a private and mustered into Co. I on 1/20/62. He makes corporal on 3/22/62 and sergeant at a date unspecified. He is listed as transferring to Co. F 94th NY on 3/10/63, when the regiments were combined. He is likely our man, since he deserted from a hospital in Washington 5/19/63. The writer of the inscription likely refers to James Newton of Co. I also of the 105th and 94th NY. He was 31 years old when he enlisted, like Brennan in the 105th NY, on 1/24/65 and mustered into Co. B as a private. He was wounded at Fredericksburg, 12/13/62, and then transferred to Co. I of the 94th on 3/10/63. His date and method of discharge are not given. I leave further research on Brennan up to the next owner. He had seen plenty of action and taking French leave home from the hospital likely seemed a very good choice. aje $165.00 sold

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18-08-10..CDV OF DASHING LONG HAIRED COLONEL ROBERT STEWART 11th INDIANA CAVALRY ...Waist-up seated view in a colonel’s frock coat with eagle shoulder straps. Morse photographer, Nashville, backmark. Stewart can be found pictured in Roger Hunt’s wonderful series Colonels in Blue. Having served in the 1st Dragoons during the Mexican War, Robert Reed Stewart started as a captain in the 1st Indiana Cavalry enlisting 4/25/61 and gaining a commission as of 7/4/61; made Major 10/22/61; and Lt. Col. 4/30/62, declining appointment to 5th Indiana Cavalry as colonel on 10/18/62. He was taken prisoner at Hartsville, TN, on 12/7/62, confined to Libby Prison, and paroled 4/3/63. He became colonel of the 11th Indiana Cavalry 2/2/64, serving in Alabama, the Department of the Cumberland, and commanded a brigade in the 5th Division of the Cavalry Corps, Military Division of Mississippi from November 27, 1864, before assuming command of that cavalry division from Jan. 18 to March 3, 1865. Having served four years and seeing the war at an end he resigned May 9, 1865, citing among other reasons, “the hardships and exposures incident to field service,” which “have wasted my energies and impaired my health.” This is a strong photo of a very active soldier. zbjjxx $325.00

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18-08-11...CDV OF MARK HOLLINSGHEAD ....Vignette bust shot shows the bearded officer in his double-breasted field grade officer’s frock. Hollingshead served from 23 February 1864 to 30 April 1866. The identification transferred from an album page to the reverse of the card in pencil by a collector and I have seen another card of him signed in ink. Trimmed at corners for album insertion, cancelled tax stamp on reverse. Men joined the army for many reasons, but none was oblivious of army pay. Officers had to pay for their own uniforms, gear, weapons and food; enlisted men might be supporting a destitute family at home and while they might be officially mustered for pay every two months, that did not mean cash in hand until the paymaster could actually get there. Entrusted with hundreds of thousands of dollars, these officers had to be sober, dedicated and precise. $50.00

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18-08-12...OFFICERS RECTANGULAR EAGLE BELT PLATE: Regulation 1851 pattern sword belt plate. The enlisted versions of the eagle buckle sported a separately applied nickel-silver wreath lightly soldered in place, and prone to breaking or falling off. Officers examples have well detailed cast wreaths. Officer's privately purchased their belt rigs, which included belt plates with much finer die work and detailing and an integrally cast wreath as part of the mold. This one has the medium width tongue on the reverse, firmly in place. This is a very nice example of the regulation plate worn by every commissioned rank in the army from Second Lieutenant right up to General. Many Confederate officer's wore this belt plate as well. I was reviewing one of our old web-catalogs from 2012 and saw that in February of that year we sold two of these... $275 and $295. This year I see many on other web pages priced from $325 to $450, which is ludicrous. I found this one at an out of the way sale priced very low. I will share the good-deal... xxaejv $245.00 sold

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18-08-13...DUG EAGLE BREAST PLATE ...Nice chocolate brown patina with a few gray areas along the edge. Both iron loops are present on the reverse, bent over. Full lead solder back showing just minor corrosion. A very good excavated regulation Union army cartridge box belt plate. These were introduced in the 1820s to fasten a soldier’s bayonet shoulder belt, and they became regulation accoutrement plates for the infantry cartridge box shoulder belt after the army directed that the bayonet be moved to the waist belt. Infantrymen and heavy artillerymen serving as infantry had these. A good solid example that really saw service down south though the exact place of recovery has been lost with time. mxgest $ 145.00 sold

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18-08-14...ARTILLERY OFFICER IN FULL DRESS AS OFFICER OF THE DAY... Attired in his regulation frock coat carrying epaulets instead of shoulder straps, this line officer wears an officer’s sword belt and his sash across his shoulder as a sign he is acting as “Officer of the Day,” a rotating assignment that gave him charge of the military camp for twenty-four hours, controlling guard mounts, police duties, etc. He holds an officer’s forage cap at his side that bears a large bullion artillery officer’s badge of crossed cannons. The backmark is Frederick’s Broadway, and he has the air of a regular army officer... ssdjtt $65.00 Sold

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18-08-15 A/B...TWO MINTY SIXTH PLATE GUTTA PERCHA CASES...Thermoplastics really came into vogue in the 1850s and were used for a wide variety of goods. Photographic cases are the most familiar and collecting the different mold designs has been a field of its own for a long time. These would fill out a case collection or be very useful in housing a high quality sixth plate tintype or ambrotype of a soldier.

A). VG to Fine condition with a patriotic motif on the cover of an American eagle with a shield on its chest below a flag and surrounded by a mortar and cannon balls. In two small cartouches on either side a coastal fortress flies a US flag and a ship enters a harbor. In a variation of the “Constitution and the Law” motif at top is a star of stars, and at bottom a sign reading “LAW.” Inside is a green velvet facing pad, but no interior paper or label in the back of the case. Good corners, no chipping, dark brown in color. 3.25 x 4 inches .... $195.00 sold

B). The second case is a SUPER CONDITION geometric and floral case, with a red facing pad and an S. Peck and Company manufacturer’s paper insert label. No chips or cracks. Crisp corners. Brown in tone .3.25in x 4in $110.00 sold

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18-08-16... ATTIC FOUND CONDITION INDIAN WAR 1872 PATTERN US BUCKLE... The quintessential US Army belt plate of the Indian Wars. Introduced as the regulation plate for mounted and dismounted belts in 1872, this plate continued in service all through the Indian Wars and into the Spanish American War. See O’Donnell and Campell, Plates 295-929 details. These take a hasp like the 1851 saber belt plates and, with some differences and variations, are mounted on belts like the Civil War NCO belt. A nice Custer era accoutrement belt plate with a very pretty undisturbed caramel age patina. $145.00 wqajjzx sold

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18-08-17.. SUPERB QUARTERPLATE GUTTA PERCHA AMBROTYPE CASE:  Quarterplate cases are tough to find in any condition and this one is exceptionally nice.  Crisp detail, no cracks or chips, near mint.  The lid has an arched gate with cherubs and a harp or lyre as the central motif.  The back has stars in each corner and large scrolled frame showing a circular center design that has an open bible with sun rays surrounding it on top of an altar and the Lord’s Prayer in the circular border around it.   There is an ambrotype inside of a young man and the red facing pad is in place, with vivid color. The only flaw I see is a very minor gray spot near the upper right spire to the arch on the cover. Outer dementtions are 5in x 4in.   One of the best condition image cases I have owned. kobjjzs $295.00 sold

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18-08-18..“KE-KI-OU-KAH” or “STAR,” CHEYENNE BRAVE: Nice, full length 6.5in x 4.25in, standing view of Ke-Ki-Ou-Kah, who was a Cheyenne Indian educated at a Kansas college in 1876 when the government removed 4,800 Cheyenne to the western part of the Indian territory. He was converted to Christianity and became a Missionary Baptist. He started touring as an activist speaker in 1884, covering 20 states by 1892. Much of his lecturing put forward the case for Indian rights and laid out “just causes for complaint,” as one North Carolina newspaper put it in a headline, summarizing hundreds of broken treaties, incursions by settlers into Indian lands, forcible displacement by the army, and the practices of corrupt Indian agents. He was able to make his case even more appealing to his audiences by demonstrating these wrongs impeded some tribes from gaining the benefits of civilization and Christianity and were thus a challenge to the country’s “boasted civilization, philanthropy, Christianity and missionary zeal.” Mounted on gray cardstock, this image bears no photographer imprint and may have been something sold at his lecture appearances. He is dressed in native garb, and poses quite conventionally with one hand resting on a draped table, a curtain at left and painted backdrop behind him. A very interesting figure. ...vgjx $145.00 sold

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18-08-19...CDV OF “LITTLE JOHNNY CLEM” aka THE DRUMMER BOY OF SHILOH aka THE DRUMMER BOY OF CHICKAMAUGA... Very nice view of John Lincoln Clem (he chose his middle name) wearing his diminutive sergeant’s blouse with belt, cap in hand and holstered revolver. Morse’s Gallery of the Cumberland photographer back mark. What makes this view extra special is the period ink notation at bottom, “Little Johnny Clem,” which seems a rather sentimental label for a youngster with so much sand. Born in 1851, he was nine years old when he ran away from home and tried to join an Ohio regiment who refused him due to his age. He then hooked up with the 22nd Michigan, who adopted him as mascot and made him a drummer. He loved army life and is reputed to have carried a musket shortened for his use. He has long been credited with shooting a Confederate Colonel off his horse at Chickamauga who made the mistake of demanding Clem's surrender. He was promoted to sergeant soon after, and was assigned to duty as a courier, which is probably when this photo was taken. He was captured at one point and used as propaganda by the Confederates to show how hard-pressed for manpower the Union army was. Wounded twice, he was finally discharged in 1864, but was commissioned in the regular army (by Grant) after the war and became the last active duty Civil War veteran to retire from the army, which he did in 1915. I have always found the sentimental stories of him amusing. Clem was one tough little kid who loved soldiering and soldier life... I am familiar with a 22nd Michigan soldier's diary that contains an entry... "Clem is drunk again." A very rare and striking view of a significant Civil War hero. Trimmed across the top... kfbjk $1,150.00

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18-08-20...QUATERPLATE TINTYPE PARDS AND MAYBE BROTHERS... Full length view of two soldiers in front of a painted camp backdrop with a street of tents behind them and a tinted US flag at right. Both men are privates in fatigue dress: four-button blouses with forage caps. They have a certain formality though. They each wear their infantry waistbelts with cap box in place and US belt plates visible for the came and each stands straight. The figure on the right places his hand on his comrade’s shoulder, and each looks off into the distance. The photographer has tinted their cheeks slightly and added some color to their regulation issue trousers. Along with their fatigue dress and accoutrement belts, the dirt floor makes it clear this is a camp photo and these men are in the field. There is enough facial similarity to suggest these two are related, likely brothers, but their identities are unfortunately lost. Housed in a separated leatherette case showing some scuffs. The image itself is crisp and clear. sbges $395.00 sold

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18-08-21..UNION KNIFE FOLDING MESS SET ... Mess gear was issued to soldiers by the recruiting service, but frequently of poor quality and often lost.  Ingenious combination fork-knife-spoon sets were attractive alternatives and widely available from commercial sources. This is the classic two-section version with a brass spoon, a two-prong fork, and a knife that could be used as a pocket knife as well. ARMY KNIFE / UNION is clearly stamped at base of the fork. Excavated examples with these markings are well known from Civil War camps and more than one soldier had his photograph taken to give the folks back home an idea of the miracles of modern engineering.  Very good condition with a small replaced piece of handle where the shank of the spoon enters the wood.  ...vachv $265.00 sold

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18-08-23... EAGLE BREAST PLATE ... These 1826 pattern round eagle plates were first issued on early bayonet shoulder belts and were later directed by the army to be moved to the cartridge box sling. These have often been polished by well-meaning family members or collectors, which leaves them shiny bright and lacking in detail. This is a very fine example, non-dug, un-messed with and having a nice patina and great detail. One of the nicest I have owned. There are just a couple of tiny stains on the face that are hardly noticeable and one on the reverse. The lead solder back is intact with just minor oxidation and the iron loops are in place and not bent or rusted. A leather thong is with the plate, probably added by a collector and not very old, but it does show how these were fastened to the cartridge box sling. This is a striking and key U.S. accoutrement plate with a number of variations for the collector. Ready to be mounted on a sling if you need one or be part of an infantry display.... waejw $215.00 sold

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18-08-24...SMALL SIZED US CARTRIDGE BOX PLATE ... Very nice, untouched example of the small size 1839 pattern US oval cartridge box plate. This smaller size was intended for pistol, rifle, and carbine cartridge boxes from 1839 to 1861 and was carried into the field by many early Civil War volunteer troops. This is a fine non-excavated example with a great, untouched, age patina. The lead solder back is smooth and the wire loops are in place. Much scarcer than the large size examples. Perfect for an early western plains wars, Mexican War, or early Civil War display and a key piece in a U.S. plate collection as well....agj $295.00 sold

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NOTE: In case you did not know this trick....
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18-08-25...DARLING AND HARRIS MICHIGAN OVER & UNDER MULE EAR SIDE HAMMER RIFLE & SHOTGUN COMBO:... You have to love side-hammer guns. This one sports a 45 caliber rifle barrel over a 12 gauge shotgun barrel. The mechanism was simple, but effective. The upper barrel is stamped “ ..]rling. C.H. Harris Otsego Mich” on the top (and also marked “cast steel,”) the left being partly obscured by the long rear sight. This is certainly the mark of William K. Darling and C.H. Harris, who worked as gunsmiths in Otsego (Allegan County) Michigan and are recorded in Chapin’s 1867-1868 business directory for the state, though they were certainly in business much earlier. This gun must have been a good one and well liked by the owner. The tang has provision for a lollipop peep sight in addition to the standard sights present on the top of the barrel. Double set triggers actuate the side hammers. The top hammer cocks and functions. The shotgun hammer has good spring tension but the sear is worn and it will not stay on cock. The ramrod is side mounted on the left. The trigger guard is rather crudely cast, and the gun is decorated sparsely with a small brass patch box in the right butt, which still has some patches in it, a small compartment on the underside behind the trigger guard tang for caps, and an inlaid silver crescent moon on the left butt flat. The lock is mounted with a single side screw. A wood screw shows on the upper left butt flat just forward of the brass crescent butt plate, but what its function was is unclear since there is no repair, and it doesn’t appear to secure any part of portion of the gun. A very folky rifle, full of character circa 1860. $975.00

needs review

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18-08-26...ENLISTED CIVIL WAR NAVY BELT... This is the 1862 pattern of seaman’s belt that replaced the old brass hook and standing loop design with a Goodyear patent friction buckle. These belts are very simple and very, very scarce. They were made in buff and in bridle leather, as this one is. The belt has good color and is flexible, with some scattered wear spots from abrasion. There is one deep scuff, shown in the photo, where the belt had been left in the buckle which marred the surface finish on the belt.  Sailors wore these to carry cutlasses, pistols, cartridge pouches, etc. as part of landing parties, but also on gun crews in expectation of either boarding an enemy or being called upon to repel boarders. A scarce regulation Civil War navy accoutrement belt. About 100 times rarer than an army belt and buckle but priced about the same. $495.00 sold

 

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18-08-27 ... CDV SOUTHWEST VIEW OF BATTERY NO. 1 ... Brady album gallery card number 365, taken by Barnard and Gibson during McClellan's peninsular campaign. Clear view of heavy caliber Parrot guns in their fortifications. Copyright information at bottom front and descriptive label on reverse. Some staining to card and label but very clear view with just a couple of small spots. McClellan was an Engineer by training and methodical in building fortifications that he planned to use in a cautious advance against Richmond, starting with his planned siege of Yorktown. The guns and engineering were impressive and photographers were anxious to document them. For the folks back home this was a nice proof of northern industrial might and McClellan's scientific approach to war. A nice early war view, when people still thought the war might come to a swift conclusion ... abe-cjohn ... $225.00 sold

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18-08-29 ... EPAULETS ... Lieutenant's regulation set.  Very good condition but with some staining to the top of the straps and minor loss to the yellow silk undersides. The bullion measures roughly ¼ of an inch which would indicate use by a lieutenant. Your basic line officer's insignia ... $175.00 sold

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18-08-30... EPAULETS  ... Mexican War Colonel? of Infantry Silver bullion epaulets with blouse size silver eagle-I eagle buttons. This is a nice pair showing both the branch of service in infantry silver/white and the use of the Mexican War and pre-1854 pattern silver infantry "eagle-I" buttons. A pair of holes on either strap shows they previously carried rank insignia. While the diameter of the bullion measures slightly larger than that prescribed for captains, and slightly smaller than Major and above... I believe these were worn by a colonel.   If I look carefully I see the faint outline of eagles wings on one strap ... $325.00

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18-08-31 ... WILLIAM ROSE 1812 CONTRACT CAVALRY SABER ... Relic condition, but a very very scarce War of 1812 US dragoon saber by William Rose. The Purveyor of Public Supplies contracted with Rose for 500 sabers in March, 1812. Ours follows the example pictured in The American Sword as number 27. The metal is pitted overall, but about 2/3 of the wood grip remains and the edge and point are good. If anything the missing wood enables you to see the underlying construction of the sword. Bird’s head pommel, with the blade tang secured by a nut. Iron backstrap, ferrule and P-shaped guard. The blade is curved with a single edge and clipped point. The strongest point of our example is not only the “W.Rose” marking stamped on the spine of the blade, but the legible “V” over “MW” stamped on the ricasso, which is the view mark of Marine Wickham the US inspector of arms in Philadelphia. His initials sometimes show up as a simple “W" and also as “MTW.” The example shown by Peterson has a small “W” over a large “V. No scabbard, of course (Rose’s contract specified iron scabbards,) but a very rare and hard-to-find saber intended for US light dragoons and thus a significant piece in a US edged weapons or War of 1812 collection. A wonderful and super rare relic of the War of 1812 ... noco ... $650.00

needs new price

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18-08-32....COLT SECOND MODEL DERRINGER ... Made from about 1870 to 1890, this .41 caliber was a handy vest pocket gun. The walnut grips on ours are good, showing deep checkering and just the slightest of wear around screwplate on the left. The fit to the metal is tight. The scroll engraving shows just the lightest of wear, also on the right, and metal is a smooth, dull silver overall with some hints of gray and a bit of brown on the barrel. Matching serial number 1534 on the butt and underside of the barrel. Correct Colt barrel markings on the top, just a tad light on the left, but with a very visible “No 2” at right and sunrays just aft, at the top of the receiver, and another bit of scroll engraving just behind the hammer—this was about the only Colt that indulged in engraved details like this.  Slight crack where backstrap meets the frame.   A nice early western “back-up” piece that might be a card-player’s or traveler’s ace-in-the-hole.  $695.00    zxgjjvx

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18-08-33... EXTREMELY HANDSOME AND APPEALING FRENCH 1822 PATTERN CAVALRY OFFICER’S SABER WITH INTERESTING GRIP ... This sword is unmarked but is obviously a French 1822 cavalry officer’s saber with a raised palmette (floral design) on the upper quillon area of the brass guard and the standard cast floral motifs along the edges of the pommel cap.  This is the pattern that Ames copied for our US 1840 sabers.  It was also copied by the Thomas-Griswold Co. for their CS cavalry officer's sabers.  The grip is unusual and really appealing in having a starkly rectangular configuration ...  flat on all four sides.   This feature is most of the reason I bought this super old sword.  The grip contour reminds me of early First Empire officer's swords.   The sharkskin and wire binding are excellent. There is a narrow separation line from age along the top edge but the grip is tight.  A thin red cloth washer is in place under the guard and the blade is plain, with no etched motifs.  Excellent condition overall.  The scabbard is steel, with carrying rings, drag and riveted throat in place. The blade is largely bright, with a little brown appearing near the ricasso. The scabbard shows some light surface rust near the drag, but is mostly a bluish gray.  Perfectly acceptable for Union or Confederate cavalry displays.  $1,100.00 sold

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