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18-10-00 ...IMPERIAL GERMAN ULAN - HORSE - BATTLEFIELD FOLK ART...  This is a new one on me... a decorated actual shoulder blade bone from a cavalry horse that died in the service of Prussia in the old days of the King and Kaiser.   It is very attractive, nicely polished, 13 inches tall, and decorated as shown with a military scene painted at the top, a regimental crest in the middle, and unit ID at the bottom.   The top military scene looks like cavalry getting ready to make a sneak attack from the woods.  The men are wearing the mortar-board style helmets and are decked out in full Ulan garb.  One guy looks to be peering at the enemy through field glasses.  I don't know enough about German military history to tell if this is Franco-Prussian War, or Early in WW-1.  I am confident it is between those two wars.  I would assume the bone is a relic off the battlefield from a horse that had been killed in action... perhaps picked up months after the battle.  Despite the grusome nature of the medium,  this is really cool and very handsome.  $350.00 Sold

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18-10-01 ... PRE WAR OF 1812 AMERICAN ARTILLERY HANGER SWORD... A handsome and solid early US sword in fine condition and complete with the scabbard. 26+ inch slightly curved blade. Blade is plain with no etching. Leather covered grip has twisted wire wrap. Full length leather scabbard with brass throat and drag... very solid. The throat patina matches the guard. The drag patina is totally attic dark color... never touched. This sword is shown in Bezdek's Vol II of American Swords and Sword Makers. It is on the bottom right of page 276, and he lists it as being Circa 1795-1805 Artillery Officer. In my opinion this is appropriate for Infantry or Artillery based on the blade length. Of slight interest is the following forum regarding another example of this sword...

http://www.swordforum.com/forums/showthread.php?109423-ID-and-Approximate-date-of-US-Saber-with-stirrup-style-guard

I purchased this at an estate auction in New England that had three early swords all out of the same family and same house. This was the most "modern" of the three, and the only one where I was the successful bidder. A very affordable American weapon from the War of 1812. $650.00 Sold

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18-10-02 ... 30th MICHIGAN PRESENTATION OFFICER’S SWORD WITH SILVER HANDLE .... A classy presentation sword given to a veteran officer. This high grade officer’s sword has an eagle-head quillon and another eagle with a US shield on its chest amid the floral motifs cast in the counter guard. It has a hollow cast silver grip that has toned down and blends in with the brass hilt. The blade bears the regulation “U.S.” on one side and American eagle on the other with EPU ribband, both surrounded by floral etching, somewhat light, but visible. The blade is a mix of bright and silver gray overall and has a good edge and point. The spine is etched “Iron Proof,” a fairly standard phrase of a temper guarantee found on lots of swords imported into the US from foreign makers. The metal scabbard has four very handsome brass mounts. The middle mounts and drag are engraved with floral designs and interlocked oval eyes on both sides. The scabbard body has pretty much all its original blue, oxidizing slightly toward brown. Between the throat and upper mount the presentation is engraved on the face of the scabbard: 

“Chas. C. Lamb/ 1st Lieut. 30th Mich. Inf./ Presented / by his Company / Jan. 1st 1864”.

Lamb, 36 years old, had enlisted at Mount Clemens, MI, in the 8th Michigan Cavalry on 4/23/63 and was commissioned Captain of Co. L the same day. That unit saw its first service against Morgan in Ohio and Kentucky in early and mid-1863, and then took part in the East Tennessee campaign, fighting Forrest and opposing Longstreet at Knoxville. During Lamb’s service with that unit they saw took part in many small unit actions. CW lists 47 instances of casualties while he was with them. The rigors of such active field service must have taken a toll, however, and he was discharged for disability June 4, 1864. Michigan was not restful, though. Concerns about the possibility of a raid into Michigan by Confederate sympathizers and refugees in Canada, led to the formation of the 30th Michigan to guard the border along the Detroit River and the lakes.  Lamb thus enlisted again, this time taking a commission as 1st Lieutenant of Co. B 30th Michigan Infantry. He was promoted to captain and transferred to Co. C on 3/16/65, and finally mustered out on 6/30/65 at Detroit. The presentation inscription is clearly dated January 1st 1864. This is a slip by the engraver given the turn of the new year.   He had been engraving “1864” on pieces the entire preceding year. Sort of like us when we are writing checks.  It is a fine sword and comes with its original gold bullion sword knot as well.  Inscribed Michigan weapons have always been very scarce. $6950.00

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18-10-03 ... JAMES A. GARFIELD’S 42nd OHIO ...A small group put together in honor of President Garfield. Garfield was serving in the Ohio state senate at the outbreak of the war and was given command of the 42nd Ohio. He led a brigade sized command in a successful effort against Confederates in eastern Kentucky in late 1861 and early 1862, which resulted in him being promoted to brigadier general, which lead to a brigade command in the Army of the Ohio and the post of chief of staff to Rosecrans. He survived Chickamauga with his reputation intact, but Grant gave command of the Army of the Cumberland to Thomas and Garfield sought his future in the US congress. The grouping consists of a rare Civil War CDV bust view of Garfield as a brigadier general, a memorial ribbon commemorating his death in 1881, and two pieces of Civil War 42nd regiment hat insignia. The insignia are the regulation badges for the officer’s dress or “Hardee” hat and are the scarce metal-backed variety with the bullion embroidered velvet stretched and sewn over a thin metal plate with fastening loops protruding through the polished cotton backing material. The oval hunting horn lacks one loop on the reverse, but still has its wire border and good color to the velvet with no tears. The gold bullion horn has toned down slightly, but has not gone to the zinc color often seen except on the very upper part of the mouthpiece of the horn. The backing is solid but has a separation line. The oval eagle and ribbon side piece likewise has its full border, bright sequined wings and good color to the velvet, though the stitching securing it to the edge of the backing has come undone. The memorial ribbon is printed black on white silk, now a light cream color with two very minor stains. The CDV is not backmarked and perhaps a pirated view, but very crisp nevertheless. Metal-backed bullion insignia have always been sought after by collectors even without a regimental association. This is a nice little group.... $1,150.00  

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18-10-05 ... EAGLE HEAD US MARINE OR NAVY OFFICER’S SWORD Altered to knife ...This is an altered US Navy model 1841 Eaglehead officers sword.  The sword does not have  the knuckle bow, branches, or folding guard.  The blade is a wide, gently curved, single-edged blade with a spearpoint and short false edge that has the width and heft of the later 1852 navy officer’s sword. The blade has a good edge and point, and shows a smooth silver gray with gilt highlighted engraving showing, from the hilt down, a fouled naval anchor, a circle of thirteen stars, and a branch of leaves and acorns, which are typical naval motifs as well. The eagle head is robust and the brass backstrap is deeply cast and chased in the form of feathers, as is the carved bone grip. Both the head and backstrap feathers are highlighted by strong remnants of the gilding in the recesses. There is one small chip in the bone at the eagle’s throat and some typical shrinkage along the back edge of the grip, but detailing is crisp, with little wear.  If you needed the grip or cross guard or back strap or eagle pommel for restoring another sword this would be just the ticket.  But it is great just the way it is and appears to have been carried just this way. Very handsome $650.00 Sold

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18-10-06 ... US NAVY CARTRIDGE BOX ...The navy was always conservative in its spending and you see a lot more navy gear reused and modified than you do equipment from the other services. Here is a Civil War US Navy musket or rifle cartridge box with full cover, latch tab and wide belt loop in place and a very legible USN in an oval embossed on the cover. The box was kept in service after the war and modified for use with the later navy rifles by lowering the inner box front and fitting for new cartridge holders. In this case a wood block was inserted at some point, likely when Bannerman or one of the other surplus dealers purchased them from the government and sold them off to militia and cadet groups. As an illustration of changing accoutrement patterns the box is interesting, but for a Civil War naval display it is a great and relatively inexpensive addition since with the flap down there is no way to tell whether the box has been altered or not. This has not been treated with any leather dressing, polish or preservative, but would dress up nicely if you chose to do so.  Makes a wonderful and very affordable display item with Civil War navy accoutrements. $245.00 Sold

 

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18-10-07 ... US MODEL 1862 SPRINGFIELD... Regulation US Model 1861 Springfield, manufactured and dated 1862. A true Springfield rifle musket from the Springfield arsenal up in Massachusetts. A very nice example of the classic Civil War rifle musket with a good early war date. The metal is very good, smooth, in the bright, and toned down slightly to a dull silver with some scattered gray spots. The lock has a crisp Springfield eagle with with U.S. Springfield stamp forward and an 1862 date behind the hammer. The barrel shows a matching 1862 along with the V/P/Eaglehead proofs. Swivels, bands, springs, rammer, sights and sight leaves are all in place. The wood shows a warm deep brown, a little darker toward the butt. The left side stock flat still has a visible ESA inspectors cartouche and very faint sub inspectors cartouche. (Erskine S Allin was Springfield‘s master armorer.) The wood to metal fit is tight and the wood edges show just slight rounding from handling. The mechanics are perfect. The nipple and clean out screw are very nice condition originals and were likely replaced by a shooter fifty years ago or so. Altogether this is a totally honest and solid example of the standard US infantry long arm that is a key piece in a Civil War collection. Decent bore. The 1861 Springfield made at Springfield is "hands down" the gun most sought by collectors. 100% original, 100% complete, mechanically perfect.

$2,250.00 (If you want a replica rifle sling with proper markings add $10.) Sold

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18-10-08 ... BEAUTIFUL NEAR MINT MANHATTAN REVOLVER ...  this is one of the best condition examples I have ever owned or seen.   Much like the Colt pocket and navy revolvers, .36 caliber Manhattans were well regarded in their day and were popular private purchase handguns from about 1859 to 1868.  This one has nearly all of the  lustrous blue and case colors, a crisp cylinder scene, and superb grips.  All matching serial number 68822. About 90 percent barrel blue on the 4-inch barrel that shows small handling scratches and small spots of finish loss but blends very well with the strong color on the cylinder, which has vivid cylinder scenes.  The loading assembly and frame show strong case colors. The screw slots of the forward three screws show some wear. The frame screws seem untouched. The grips are very good, with lots of finish and just one small ding at the upper right and some minor dings and a short scratch midway on the left and butt. The triggerguard and backstrap show traces of silver.  British proofs on the frame forward of the cylinder showing the company was trying to gain a share of the European market.  This is a very rare feature on any Manhattan firearm.  Top drawer in all respects....  $2,695.00

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18-10-09 ... RARE PRE CIVIL WAR STATUE HANDLE "JUNIOR SONS OF AMERICA SWORD"... PREDECESSOR OF THE PATRIOTIC SONS OF AMERICA.  Here is a very handsome sword of the ancient patriotic fraternal organization "Junior Sons of America"founded in 1847 in Philadelphia.  This organization evolved into The Patriotic Sons of America which is still in existence today with the stated mission to uphold basic American principles laid out by George Washington and the American Constitution.  The hilt of this sword has a fine standing full figure statue rendition of George Washington with an American flag draped over his shoulder.  The statue-handle form is one of the rarest in the arena of antique US swords.  The casting of a full statue grip was very expensive.   Most swords of the PSOA organization are very chintzy lodge style swords from late Victorian times, however this JSOA sword dates from before the Civil War and has an early etched mark of W.H. Horstmann, and  other early style patriotic motifs including an eagle with a ribbon which reads “E Pluribus Unum”.   The king's head maker's stamp is that of Gebruder Wyersberg (1787-1883).   The accompanying brass scabbard also dates to the late 1840s as does the blade form and the style of the blade etching.  The blade has a good edge and point. The brass scabbard is complete with both carrying rings and it rudimentary drag. The blade pad is in place below the guard. The hilt has an untouched, mellow, aged patina.   Likely the very first pattern of the Junior Sons of America sword.   This is only the second such example I have encountered in 45 years.  ca. 1850...    $1250.00 Sold

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18-10-10 ... WWII INSCRIBED US NAVY OFFICER’S SWORD ... Made like the 1852 pattern US Navy Officer’s sword, these later versions feature, thinner and lighter blades. This one is nicely identified on the blade in an etched panel “George Scruggs Bullen,” which is matched by the engraved monogram on the scabbard throat. The hilt and grip are excellent. The scabbard is complete and very good, with just a couple of minor dings on the drag. The blade has a good edge and point and the blade etching is vivid. There is a lot of research to be done on Bullen. What we can say now is that George Scruggs Bullen (1911-1981) served from 1934 to 1964 and reached the rank of captain and, among other assignments, commanded the USS Leonard F. Mason and USS Muliphen. $265.00 Sold

 

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18-10-11 ... RARE MARTIALLY MARKED  BALLARD CARBINE ... Scarce U.S. contract Ballard carbine. Ball and Williams received a government contract for 5,000 of these .44 Cal. carbines in January 1864, but found they could get more money for them from the state of Kentucky and, after delivering 1,000 in March and another 500 in August, they decided to forfeit their contract. This one, serial #9940, falls into the range of the August shipment to the U.S. government and shows the correct “MM” stamp in an oval  cartouche that identify the US guns.  About one third of these US carbines ended up in the hands of Vermont militia recruited to defend the state after the St. Albans raid by Confederates coming down from Canada. The remainder ended up on the open market, where Kentucky snatched them up for their cavalry in September 1864. This has a good action, with both sights and both swivels in place. The metal is smooth with blue turned plum brown on the barrel, and the receiver showing mostly gray with some mixed in brown. The Ball and Williams, and Merwin and Bray agent markings are visible on the left side of the frame, but are rubbed on the forward portions. The Ballard Patent stamp on the right is clear throughout. (The position of the markings on the frame is correct after serial number 9,000.) The butt plate has been modified by the shooter for a better fit, and comfort.  He removed the metal butt plate, contoured that area and padded it with leather.  The stock shows some dings and one set of initials lightly scratched in. The “MM” cartouche on the left is very clear.   A very scarce version of the Ballard carbine that shows honest use.  These military marked examples are among the hardest carbines for a collector to find...  $1,850.00 Sold

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18-10-12 ... BURNSIDE CARBINE ... Nice Fifth Model Burnside, the 1863-1865 pattern most widely issued, bearing its “Model of 1864” stamp on the breach block, which no one has yet fully explained, since they started coming out in 1863 (but perhaps the company just wanted to seem very modern and to get ahead of the game.) All Burnside maker and patent stamps are clear, the serial number, 18955, matches on block and frame, and best of all, there is a very clear inspector cartouche on the left wrist. Sights, band and sling bar and ring are in place. The butt swivel was removed, which is completely understandable since it was entirely unnecessary if you were using an army issue carbine sling. Easily replaced with two wood screws if you want to do so. Mechanism and bore are good. Smooth metal overall with just some firing corrosion on the top of the breechblock and a little roughness on the underside of the breechblock assembly. Barrel is plum color just with some scattered gray coming up. Traces of mottled case color remain on the frame. The wood has a couple of medium scratches on the offside. Many cavalry regiments were armed with these carbines: the 1st Michigan, 5th Ohio, 3rd WV, 3rd PA, and many more. There were likely many Yankee infantrymen who wished old Burnside had stuck with inventing arms rather than making his fame by poorly commanding an army in the field and making his silly whiskers famous. He did design a fine rifle... A very good example of one of the classic Civil War cavalry carbines. ... $1,150.00 

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18-10-13 ... TWO-PIECE MILITIA EAGLE BUCKLE AND BELT... These two-piece interlocking eagle plates were very popular in the 1830s and 1840s, and held up in some militia units right up to the Civil War, North and South.  They frequently show up in photographs of early war volunteers.  This one has a nice undisturbed patina and shows a ferrocious American eagle with shield on its breast, clutching the olive branch and arrows, bordered by a row of stars. The surrounding hasp has a typical floral border but in a scarce variant having the knot at the top and the leaves draping downwards on either side. The belt loops have a matching, notched rope pattern. The belt is a typical thin, tarred black leather belt with a narrow, brass wire adjuster. The end  holding the tongue (spoon) portion is very crudely stitched...  about like Confederate crude.  It could be a legitimate example of Confederate “make-do” in the field.   $695.00

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18-10-14 ... 1850 DATED SPRINGFIELD ... 1842 pattern US musket. Lock is marked and dated Springfield/1850 aft of the hammer with a Springfield eagle forward, just slightly rubbed at the bottom. Lockplate and hammer are smooth metal with brownish-blue tones. The barrel shows heavy pitting on the bolster and top of the breech from firing corrosion of the percussion caps and shows just dim V/P/eaglehead barrel proofs. Interestingly the breech plug was replaced with an 1833 dated plug from an 1816 pattern musket. The stock is a nice warm brown, but shows dings and divots overall from use as well as some rounded edges and some gaps around the breechplug tang. The rear sling swivel is gone, but the bands, rod, front sight, bayonet stud, etc., are all in place. Nipple replaced using an original. Some light pitting on the buttplate tang and in a small band around the muzzle roughly where the bayonet stud is positioned. A lot of gun for the money and one that would fit an early war infantry display of union or Confederate effects. The trumpet style ramrod alone is worth a couple hundred dollars… $795.00 Sold

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18-10-15 ... Extremely Rare and Fine Emancipation Proclamation Lithograph in Beautiful Tiger Maple Frame: An extremely scarce and desirable piece of Lincolniana. Known in the lithograph world as Eberstadt 40 it is an ingenious rendition of Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation in which the words are arranged and emboldened or lightened to form a portrait of Lincoln. It was lithographed and printed in Davenport, Iowa by lithographer August Hageboeck, and bears the printed 1865 copyright statement and the original artist's data of W.H. Pratt printed at the bottom. Document is 14 x 11 inches in very good condition with moderate toning and foxing. This is the first issuance of this Hageboeck portrait lithograph. Other editions are known with decorative borders. In addition this is housed in an absolutely gorgeous 1830-1840 era tiger maple wall frame in the "blocks in corner" style which is extremely scarce in the world of frames. Most important is that an IDENTICAL lithograph just sold at Swann's Auction in NYC on September 27th, 2018 and brought $1,750.00 including the B.P. and it was just a loose lithograph. Our frame is certainly worth a couple hundred dollars all by itself. We're not in New York City, I didn't have to pay a fortune for this, I'll let the next guy enjoy it for .... $950.00

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18-10-16 ... EXTREMELY SCARCE H. HEAD, QUINCY ILLINOIS CAP BOX.... Regulation Civil War issue cap box by one of the scarcest makers.  These are extremely rare, but I acquired several by this maker from the estate of a good friend who liked Illinois material and spent a lifetime collecting it.  He bought every piece of Illinois marked leather he could find.   His son sold me around a dozen of the best examples… his dad had 40+ years of collecting involved in the accumulation. Don’t think they are common just because a few are suddenly available at once in my stock.  Cap boxes were needed by every soldier armed with a percussion weapon and were made by a wide variety of contractors and arsenals in several different configurations. Among Civil War collectors they are collecting field in themselves. This one is in great condition, with good finish, just some crackling overall to the exterior and minor abrasion to the belt loops and high spots. belt loops and stitching in place and a deep maker stamp on the inner flap reading: “H. Head Quincy, Ill.” Henry Head was a saddle and harness maker who obtained government contracts for .58 caliber and .69 caliber accoutrements deliverable to the St. Louis Arsenal, as well as 1864 pattern accoutrement sets, bridles and halters. A nice example by a very scarce maker.  $275.00

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18-10-17 ... VERY EARLY SPRINGFIELD TRAPDOOR RIFLE ...A good, early Indian War 1866 second model Allin conversion. This was the pattern of rifle issued to units on the frontier starting in early 1867 and was the gun used by a detachment of the 27th US Infantry in the famous Wagon Box Fight with the injuns.  Designed by Erskine Allin, some 25,000 of these .50 caliber rifles were made at Springfield in 1866 by altering model 1863 percussion rifle muskets to single shot breech loaders. The barrels were bored out and lined and rifled to fire a .50 caliber round.  The barrel length, band springs, etc. were retained, as were the bright finishes of the 1863 arms, though the breech block was darkened by oil-quenching in the case hardening process. Ours shows the correct 1864 Springfield lock markings and the correct 1866/eagle breech stamp. The hammer still shows some water-quenched case hardening colors. The breech block shows a silver gray with traces of darker gray from blackened oil-quenched finish. The lock plate is a mix of bright and gray. All springs, bands, sights and cleaning rod are in place. 100% original, 100% complete, and mechanically perfect.  The wood is very good, with a tight fit to the metal and has just light handling wear.   A rack number is stamped on the left butt flat. A very good example of key US regulation long arm in the development of the trapdoor system and one with some interesting early western connections.  $950.00 Sold

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18-10-18 ... .22 Cal. SHARPS PEPPERBOX PISTOL... These handy little derringers were made from 1859 to 1874 and were favorite back-up weapons of card-players, soldiers, travelers, and others. The rotating firing pin on the hammer was a clever invention to make a vest pocket size repeating pistol. If I remember correctly, one of these was even found on Wild Bill Hickock when they reinterred him in Deadwood. Ours is in very good to near fine condition, with excellent grips, a tight fit to the metal, aged patina to the brass, which shows very legible Sharps maker and patent stamps on either side of the frame. The barrels show a lot of faded blue with just some rubbing to gray on the high points and muzzle. The mechanism is good and the serial number is 42300. This is the Type 1... A very nice example priced right. $695.00 Sold

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18-10-19 ... M1819 CONVERSION PISTOL... I love regulation military flintlock pistols that really show frontier use in early America.  This is a regulation US 1819 pistol by North, clearly showing his lockplate marking, though with the date illegible, and crisp barrel inspection and proof marks.  This obviously wound up in private hands and was converted to percussion in the early 1830s with simple side-lug and nipple and a hammer that has a semi-military profile at top, but a typical civilian flat s-curve body. The crudeness of the conversion makes me think it was likely southern done.  The man who acquired this meant to be prepared. Surplus muskets and rifles made good hunting weapons, but pistols were strictly for self-defense or mischief. The sliding safety was removed as pointless, but the barrel and stock were kept at full length with the sights in place, and if the .54 caliber round did not make an impression on an opponent, it would be a useful club. The ramrod is a wonderful old wood replacement.  The stock is very good, with a visible cartouche on the left side and good color. The metal is brown overall and generally smooth, with just slight corrosion at the nipple. A perfect Alamo era side arm for a western hunter or adventurer that would look great with a period Bowie or hunting pouch and rifle. The lock functions properly.  $650.00

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18-10-20 ... GAYLORD PISTOL CARTRIDGE BOX .... A very good condition cavalry pistol cartridge box. This one is made and marked by Emerson Gaylord, perhaps the best known supplier of accoutrements to the US government in the Civil War. This is the early to mid-war style box with riveted belt loops but with a latch tab secured by a single line of stitching with no rivet. These boxes had no interior tins or blocks, but had an extra set of leather dividers running lengthwise to keep the packs of pistol cartridges in place by friction. This is the medium size box which was used for both .36 and .44 caliber rounds, the size being determined by the configuration of the cartridge packs rather than the caliber. This one has good finish with just the usual crazing, some scattered abrasions, the usual asterisk stake mark from the leather worker closing up his tack holes, and a nice sharp Gaylord stamp.  $165.00 Sold

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18-10-21 ... PISTOL CARTRIDGE BOX BY GAYLORD ... Another nicely marked Gaylord made pistol cartridge box of the same configuration, with just a slightly less sharp maker stamp. Belt loops, latch tab, friction leathers are all in place and secure. This is in the same early to mid-war configuration correct for both army and navy caliber revolvers.   $160.00 Sold

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18-10-22 ... .58 CALIBER BAYONET ... The regulation US issue Civil War bayonet that was introduced with the 1855 rifle musket and retained for the 1861, 1863 and 1864 patterns and all the contract versions as well. Very clear US stamp at the base of the blade, good edge and point. The locking ring turns freely. Silver gray in color overall with some darker gray areas but no pitting. A few minute dings on the socket. Perfect to complete an infantry rifle musket or accoutrement belt set.  $150.00 Sold

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18-10-23 ... EXTREMELY SCARCE H. HEAD, QUINCY ILLINOIS CAP BOX.... Regulation Civil War issue cap box by one of the scarcest makers.  These are extremely rare, but I acquired several by this maker from the estate of a good friend who liked Illinois material and spent a lifetime collecting it.  He bought every piece of Illinois marked leather he could find.   His son sold me around a dozen of the best examples… his dad had 40+ years of collecting involved in the accumulation. Don’t think they are common just because a few are suddenly available at once in my stock.  Cap boxes were needed by every soldier armed with a percussion weapon and were made by a wide variety of contractors and arsenals in several different configurations. Among Civil War collectors they are collecting field in themselves. This one is in great condition, with good finish, just some crackling overall to the exterior and minor abrasion to the belt loops and high spots. belt loops and stitching in place and a deep maker stamp on the inner flap reading: “H. Head Quincy, Ill.” Henry Head was a saddle and harness maker who obtained government contracts for .58 caliber and .69 caliber accoutrements deliverable to the St. Louis Arsenal, as well as 1864 pattern accoutrement sets, bridles and halters. A nice example by a very scarce maker.  $275.00

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18-10-24 ... MUSICIAN’S SWORD BY C. ROBY ...   Extremely fine regulation 1840 pattern musician’s sword and scabbard.  Bright blade still showing the original factory cross-polishing at the ricasso, along with crisp U.S./1863/F.S.S. and Roby manufacturing stamps (just a tad light on the left side of the circular Roby logo.) Blade, hilt and scabbard all have matching FSS inspector marks, showing the pieces have been together forever. The leather scabbard is solid and has good finish, just the slightest of crackles in a couple of spots and one shallow mar crosswise, but no bends or breaks. These swords were regulation for bandsmen and field music: the company fifers and drummers. Roby is one of the best known U.S. edged weapons contractors to the US government during the Civil War. A really nice example.  Much nicer than most we see on the market…  $495.00 Sold

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18-10-25 ... 9th ARMY CORPS BADGE ...  It’s nice to find a real corps badge every now and again. There are so many fakes out there they seem to gain acceptance among novice collectors by their sheer number and availability, which in fact should be warning signs!  95% of those we see in online auctions are just plain fake.  Here is a fine, original, jeweler made commercial version consisting of a silver shield the size of an identification shield, engraved on the face with border lines and v-notch checking surrounding a crossed anchor and cannon, the insignia of the famed ninth army corps. The corps served in the Eastern theatre, briefly in the west, and then returned east for the 1864 overland campaign. Dead real and in great condition .  $450.00 Sold

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