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Dave Taylor
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Sylvania, OH 43560

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18-12-01...EYE CATCHING TINTYPE ARMED YANKEE 2nd LIEUTENANT STANDING IN FRONT OF A TENTED CAMP SCENE BACKDROP:  This is a sharp and clear, larger than CDV size tintype showing a very lean and handsome Union Army infantry lieutenant full standing.  He sports a forage cap with insignia. His sash is beautifully whisper tinted crimson and his trousers are likewise delicately rumor dusted sky blue by the photographer, his battle sword is at his side.  The photographer's backdrop of the tent filled camp scene is not one I recall seeing previously.  Have you?   It is distinctive enough that it may be possible to identify the artist and location.  A fine mid war image with excellent clarity, condition, and contrast.  $395.00

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18-12-02..A...B TWO  US MODEL 1872 INDIAN WAR BLACK LEATHER WAIST BELTS:  Priced separately.  Super condition leather belts showing only the lightest of handling and storage age.  Both rate a solid 9  on a scale of 10.  From the renowned antique collections of the late Ed Vebell.  If you have a loose rectangular 1872 enlisted US buckle, these are the belts you need.  One belt lacks the sliding loop adjuster which you can make yourself for about fifty cents...  $80.00  sold  Other belt has the original sliding loop...   $100.00 sold

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18-12-03...VARIANT US MODEL 1872-1874-1884 INDIAN WAR HARNESS LEATHER WAIST BELT WITH BRASS SWORD HANGER:  Super condition leather belt, near mint, showing only the lightest storage age.  Rates a solid 9.5  on a scale of 10.   This too from the renowned antique collections of the late Ed Vebell.  (Do a Google search of Ed Vebell.)  I am not well versed enough on the Indian War gear to know which variation this is.  It is constructed with stitching only (without rivets) securing the brass clasp, and was made without a brass closing hook nor holes in the leather for same.  It appears to have used friction and sliding loops (not present) to hold the buckle in place.   If you know which exact pattern this is please share your knowledge.  If you have a loose rectangular 1872 enlisted US buckle, this belt will fit it.  Super condition $100.00 sold

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18-12-04...EXTRA FINE CONDITION UNION INFANTRYMAN'S CARTRIDGE BOX AND SLING COMPLETE WITH BOTH PLATES AND BOTH TIN LINERS - MAKER MARKED ON BOX AND SLING: Another top-drawer item from the renowned Ed Vebell collection. Ed died this year at age 96. Among countless other accomplishments, he had been a courtroom artist at Neuremburg and sat closest to Hermann Goering during the proceedings. (Google search Ed Vebell.) One of the best specimens I've been able to offer in recent years. This rig rates an 8.5 or 9.0 on a scale of 10. The leather is supple, lively, and sturdy. It shows honest age and handling but no abuse. The inner flap of the box is boldly stamped "Watertown Arsenal 1864". The main compartment retains both original cartridge tins, aka tin liners. The front flap has its original handsome US oval cartridge box plate. The inner implement compartment is perfect as is the flap and strap for it. The sling is likewise excellent and matches the color, wear, and patina of the box... EXACTLY. It is maker stamped "A.W. DECROW / MAKER / BANGOR, ME. The original circular eagle shoulder belt plate (breastplate) is present. All straps, all buckles, all billets, are firmly in place. The lower right corner of the front flap bears a stamped number "27". The sling is likewise numerically stamped (where it meets the box) with "55"... significance unknown but the markings are CW period. No repairs, no missing parts. The rig is 100% and was the "keeper" rig for one of America's premier military collectors and true historical artists. I will hate to see it go. $1,250.00 sold

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18-12-05... CIVIL WAR CAVALRY CARBINE SOCKET:  Regulation socket or thimble for securing the gun barrel of a cavalryman's carbine.  This was strapped to the saddle and the rifle barrel was then inserted so the gun wouldn't bounce around as Mr. Horse trotted about with his armed trooper on board.  This too from the collection of Ed Vebell.  Around forty years ago I was contacted by a lady on the west coast who had several hundred of these she wished to sell.  She knew what they were,  and had tried marketing them as pencil holders, without great success.  I bought 300 from her for $1.50 each, and thought I would never get them all sold.  Now I wish I had bought the whole pile.  Still darn reasonable...   $59.00 sold

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18-12-06..FINE TIFFANY SIGNED OHIO CIVIL WAR VETERAN'S MEDAL 51ST REGIMENT:  The state of Ohio placed an order with famed Tiffany & Company of New York to produce 20,000 of these high quality bronze medals.  They were to be awarded to those soldiers who had re-enlisted in 1864 as "Veteran Volunteers" under War Department General Orders, No. 191.   The medals were distributed in 1866 while some troops were still in the service.  I once found a CDV album with several Buckeye Boys wearing this medal on their army uniforms just prior to their being mustered out in Columbus.  I wish I had kept one of those cartes.   Each medal is engraved with the veteran's name and regiment.  This one to Moses Yoder 51st Ohio Infantry.  Lots of Yoders hailed from around here.   Excellent condition, no ribbon.   $295.00 sold

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17-11-42...MILITIA HORSEMAN’S SABER .. American militia cavalry saber modeled on the British 1796 light cavalry saber.  Brass hilt with a reverse-P guard, fairly high quillon, with backstrap, ferrule and short rounded langets. The grip is a thin black leather that shows just the slightest bit of chipping under the tip of the pommel. Missing the binding wire, but the wrap is tight. Blade is smooth metal, steel gray with a overall dusting of brown that would likely clean up if you were so inclined. The blade has a single wide fuller, good edge with no nicks, and good point. The scabbard is full-length, black leather with brass middle and upper mounts, both with carrying rings in place, the upper mount also showing a small hole for a missing button so the saber could be carried in a cross belt frog as well as on saber slings. The scabbard is solid and in very good condition. The brass drag was long ago lost and replaced by stitching a piece of leather over the tip. This does not look terribly old to me and I would keep an eye out for a loose drag to restore it at some point. The brass mounts and hilt have a nice, mellow, aged patina and the blade tang is smooth on the pommel and not messed with. Although this pattern was used by American militia up to about 1840, the leather scabbard and contoured grip strike me as earlier, perhaps more in the 1800-1820 era.    $595.00

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18-12-08...200 YEAR OLD MILITARY MOTIF DRAPERY HOLDBACK:  Really charming porcelain and brass drapery "holdback" decorated with child military fifer in color on porcelain.  Holdbacks were mounted (screwed) into the wall beside the windows of your parlor to hold your drapery back from the window.  Circular artwork is about the size of a silver dollar.  Dates first quarter 19th century.  Very good overall with just expected age.  $65.00

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18-12-09... Original Civil War Tenth Corps Badge: One of the few surviving surplus 10th corps badges that were so plentiful in the 1950s and 1960s.  It has the white felt insert indicating 2nd division.  We frequently see these stamped brass 10th corps surplus pieces with red and white cloth inserts...  seldom blue.   The corps distinguished itself in the Carolinas and Florida at such battles as James Island, Morris Island, Fort Wagner and Olustee. This is one of the few Civil War corps badges that actually did survive the war in some large surplus quantity.  The real deal in excellent condition. $295.00 sold

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18-12-10...OHIO SOLDIER'S BROWN RUSSET LEATHER CAP BOX.... Fresh from an estate in Findlay, Ohio with some shirt tail family connection to Ohio Supreme Court justice Jacob Burket. Burket did not serve in the war as far as I can tell. Complete, solid, nice brown color... bought it an hour ago as I type this as well it comes with and old box of matches. $119.00  sold

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18-12-11...COLT'S PATENT DOUBLE CAVITY BULLET MOLD... Fresh from an estate in Findlay, Ohio with some shirt tail family connection to Ohio Supreme Court justice Jacob Burket. Burket did not serve in the war as far as I can tell. This is a double cavity .31 caliber mold for the model 1849 Colt pocket revolver. One cavity is round ball. The other is conical bullet. Complete with sprue cutter marked Colt's Patent. Overall VG condition. I have owned it an hour as I type this. $119.00 sold

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18-12-12... EARLY RUDIMENTARY TIN CANTEEN OR FLASK...  I have never seen another one of these, so I cannot document it’s precise time or place of manufacture, nor purpose.  It spoke to me when I found it, so I bought it.  It is constructed of sheet iron which is folded and soldered along the seams.  It is constructed like all so-called tinware from the Civil War era and earlier.  Very crudely put together.  It measures roughly 7 inches tall,  with a removable cover that would double as a drinking cup.  The crude tin spout is the same we see on tin canteens from 1776 colonial, to 1860s Johnny Reb examples.   There are two carrying rings on either side.   To me It has the flavor of a military canteen,  but it could also be an early mounted traveller’s flask.  In rough terms I would guesstimate the period of manufacture to be the first half of the 19th century.  Part of me wonders if it might be a War of 1812 era militia canteen made at the local level.  In any event I’ve decided  I want to $325.00 for it. sold

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18-12-13... ATTIC BLACK1862 DATED SPRINGFIELD...   A real Civil War veteran. Model 1861 rifle muskets with 1861 or 1862 dates have always been hard to find and very much in demand.  It took time for Springfield to get up to speed and the vast number of early war volunteers quickly emptied US stocks and outstripped production.  Most of these were issued out and saw hard service for three or four years in the field. This one definitely saw service, and has matching lockplate and barrel 1862 dates.  It shows great age and handling, but is as honest as Lincoln.   The lock is generally smooth and shows a mottled blackish brown patina. The lock is rubbed just forward of hammer, the US is clear, but the eagle and the left hand section of the Springfield stamp are hard to make out, though the last few letters are crisp. The bolster, rear sight and breech show pitting, the color is an even plum brown overall. The wood to metal fit is tight. The wood does show rounding from handling and there are some small chips along the bottom and front edge of the plate, dings on the left side and along the belly of the buttstock.  Sights with leaves, bands and swivels are in place. The butt plate tang has a rack number, “11” stamped near the shoulder. The mechanism is good.   When this came in and had no ramrod, so I’ve added a replica for display purposes. Otherwise 100% original.  A good solid example of the classic Civil War shoulder arm that was issued and used in the field. Not mint by a mile, but a real veteran.   $895.00 sold

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18-12-14... STANDARD ISSUE G.A.R. MEDAL....  This is the standard Grand Army of the Republic membership medal that was issued to all Union Army veterans. It was modeled after the Congressional medal of honor. Very good condition with the original ribbon, just showing light age and handling. $95.00 sold

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18-12-15...A regulation issue 1839 pattern cartridge box plate.... The standard issue plate of the Civil War.   Very attractive, showing some gilt finish left in the low areas, a few tiny dark spots, and no dings or dents. Very smooth, clean lead solder back with both loops in place. These were made by a number of suppliers and the die-strikes vary somewhat, making them a sub-category of US military plate collecting. A very nice example.  $189.00

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18-12-16....FIRST YEAR PRODUCTION US ASTON PERCUSSION PISTOL...  The pattern for this pistol was approved in 1842, contracts were not let until several years later.   Aston got his contract in February 1845, it took some time to tool up and the earliest date on these pistols (according to both Flayderman and Reilly) is 1846, which is exactly what we have here, qualifying it as first year of production and a good candidate for Mexican War service.   These single-shot .54 cal. percussion pistols were intended for mounted use, to be carried by dragoons in pommel holsters, and were equipped with a captive swivel ramrod that made it possible to reload while mounted without worrying about losing the ramrod. The wood on this one is very good, with mostly sharp lines, two crisp cartouches on the left side, warm tones, a small handling ding at rear of the left flat, and just minor scratches. The brass has an undisturbed mellow tone. The lock shows mottled gray and faint blue that are remnants of case hardening. The bolster shows light firing corrosion from the percussion caps and the hammer, which has good color, has a chip out of the lower front edge. Likely some idiot dry-fired it, luckily the chip is of little consequence.   Barrel is smooth, gray metal with faint plum brown tones, a little corrosion near the breech from firing. Small “H” assembly mark is visible at left flat, also barrel proof “P” just above it.   This has a great Mexican War date.   Many of these were still in the hands of mounted militia companies and in state arsenals at the beginning of the Civil War, making them a legitimate piece in an early war southern cavalry collection as well.   Very scarce with the 1846 date.  $1,150.00 sold

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18-12-17.... MOORE’S PATENT FRONT LOADING REVOLVER... These are very pretty little pocket pistols with lots of floral scroll engraving on the brass frames butt caps and delicate chip carving at the muzzle and sunburst spray forward of the cylinder on the top of the barrel. The front sight is in place on this one. The barrel address is crisp. And, the barrel and cylinder are fully covered with slightly faded blue-turned-plum-brown finish. There are just faint traces of the silver wash on the brass of course, but the grips are excellent, too, and the mechanics are good. Moore made about 30,000 of these from 1864 to 1870, when Colt decided to eliminate some competition and bought the firm. Until then, the .32 caliber teat-fire cartridge was a strong competitor to Smith and Wesson in the area of self-contained cartridges. This is serial number 11301 and has the early Moore barrel stamp and the correct hinged front loading gate without an extractor hook. 100% orignal and complete, index's ok but a little gummy...$495.00 sold

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18-12-18...Smith and Wesson No. 2 Army Revolver:  Standard 6 inch Barrel is marked “ SMITH & WESSON. SPRINGFIELD, MASS.” Cylinder is marked “APRIL 3 1855, JULY 5 1859, DEC 18, 1860” 32 rimfire caliber... Se­rial Number  56,794 (late 1860s). 100% Complete and mechanically perfect. Overall VG condition showing a good bit of wear but no abuse. 100% original and complete. Mechanically perfect.  $595.00

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18-12-19... GOLD MINER’S SCALE... Much like other examples in the collection we just acquired, but somewhat fancier and with a few differences. The exterior of the case is covered in a thin, textured fabric like a book binding, and at the center has a small gilt blind-stamped American eagle with a shield on its breast, clutching olive branch and arrows, along with an impressed geometric border line around the edge of the top. The purple lined case has the standard recessed areas for the scale and counterweights, six of which are still present.  $145.00

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18-12-20... MASSACHUSETTS MINUTE MAN MEDALS FOR THE FIFTH MASSACHUSETTS: VETERANS OF FIRST BULL RUN The State of Massachusetts authorized medals for those rare first responders who had answered Lincoln’s “first call” for volunteer troops to serve three months in April 1861. No other soldiers were authorized to have these. The bronze suspension bar reads “Massachusetts Minute Men 1861” and the medallion has the state seal on one side and on the other the dedication, "The commonwealth of Massachusetts to the members of the Massachusetts Militia who were mustered into the United States service in response to President Lincoln's first call for troops-April 15, 1861." The medals were then struck along the rim with the soldier’s name and unit. Somewhere between 3,000 and 4,000 of these medals seem to have been made for those early war veterans. Two brothers from California discovered a cache of these medals jn the rafters of their late father’s house, which had previously been the residence of one of the commanders of the Fifth Massachusetts. When found, these medals were still in their original cardboard boxes, but the boxes had sustained significant water damage and the brothers elected to discard them. Oh well. The brothers kept a couple of the medals and I bought the remainder. I had to pay dearly to get them but felt the find was significant. Most of these were awarded to members of Company D of the 5 th Mass. and came from the town of Haverhill. The regiment entrained for Washington April 21, 1861, and mustered into Federal service there on May 1. In July it was part of Franklin’s Brigade of Heintzelman’s Division and fought at Bull Run, losing 9 killed, 2 wounded, and 23 captured. It returned to Washington and then to Boston, where it mustered out July 31. Many of the veterans then went on to serve in other Massachusetts volunteer regiments. I can offer the medals awarded to the following members of the Fifth Massachusetts. Unless otherwise noted, they were serving in the regiment during the period of First Bull Run. 

*1* GEORGE W. EDWARDS, SGT.
Edwards was a carpenter in Haverhill and 40 years-old when he enlisted as a sergeant on 4/16/61 and mustered into Co. D on 5/1/61. He mustered out with the regiment at Boston on 7/31/61 and was commissioned as Captain of Co. G of the 50th Mass on 9/19/62. He mustered out with the regiment and later was a member of the Major Howe Post #47 GAR in Haverhill. ...$295.00 sold

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*2* LEONARD SAWYER Jr.  MUS

Sawyer must have had some musical talent. He was a 25 year-old shoemaker in Haverhill when enlisted as a musician on 4/16/61 and mustered into Co. D on 5/1/61. He mustered out on 7/31/61. He then enlisted again on 2/26/62 in the 17th Massachusetts as Principle Musician, serving until his discharge for disability on 9/30/62. The 17th was a three-year outfit that took part in Burnside’s Coastal Expedition. During Sawyer’s time with the outfit, they did duty at New Bern as part of Foster’s Division and took part in small raids, scouting, foraging, and outpost duty, losing two killed at New Bern on 5/22/62....$350.00

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*3* JOSHUA HATCH Jr.

Joshua Hatch, Jr. was a carpenter by profession and 27 years-old when he enlisted on 4/16/61 in Haverhill as a private and mustered into Co. D on 5/1/61. He served with the regiment all ninety days, including the period of Bull Run, mustering out 7/31/61. He then reenlisted in Co. G of the 50th Mass on 9/19/62 and served with them until mustering out with them 8/24/63. The nucleus of the regiment was the old 7th Mass, but Hatch’s service in the 5th must have been good training. He was made sergeant on 9/19/62 and 1st sergeant less than a month later, on 10/16/62. The regiment saw service in the deep south, being posted at Baton Rouge as part of the 19th Corps and taking part in the siege of Port Hudson, suffering light casualties in the first assault on the city. The regiment returned to Massachusetts for muster out in August. .... $ 325.00

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*4* GEORGE P. WYMAN


Wyman is not listed with any profession, but was 21 and a resident of Haverhill when he enlisted on 4/16/61 and mustered into Co. D of the 5th Mass on 5/1/61. He survived to muster out with the regiment on 7/31/61 in Boston. $295.00

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*5* THOMAS T. SALTER 4th Lt. KILLED IN ACTION AT GAINES’ MILL

Thomas T. Salter was awarded his medal for service in the 5th Mass, but became a sacrifice for his country at Gaines Mill while serving with the 22nd Mass. He was a 29 year-old shoe cutter in Haverhill when he enlisted as 4th Lieutenant in Co. D of the 5th Mass in 1860. Like many early militia units, their ranks might include more than just the two lieutenants allotted per company under Federal regulations, but he did receive a commission when they entered service for ninety days on 5/1/61 and he was with them during the time they were at First Bull Run. He mustered out 7/31/61 and received another commission, this time as 1st Lieutenant of Co. H 22nd Mass. on 9/6/61. The regiment was assigned to the 3rd Corps in the Army of the Potomac and then to Porter’s 5th Corps, fighting with McClellan on the Peninsula, taking casualties at Yorktown in April 1862 and Mechanicsville June 26, 1862. The next day they were caught in the thick of things at Gaines’ Mill when Lee struck Porter hard and the regiment lost an astounding 84 officers and men in killed or mortally wounded alone. Thomas Salter was one of those killed in that fighting which opened the Seven Days Battles. Find these medals for comissioned officer's is rare, and finding them for soliders who were killed in actions is rarer... $525.00

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*6* ENOS COLLINS

Collins was from Methuen and worked as a currier. He was 27 when he enlisted on 4/16/61 as a private and mustered into Co. D of the 5th on 5/1/61. He survived to muster out on 7/31/61 at Boston. In 1864 he enlisted once again, this time in Co. C of the 6th Mass, on 7/16/64, where he was appointed a corporal when he mustered in. This was the third term of service for the 6th Mass and the men were enlisted for 100 days. They served near Fort C.F. Smith as part of the 22nd Army Corps around Washington and then transferred to Fort Delaware where they did guard duty over the Confederate prisoners of war held on “Pea Patch Island.” He mustered out on 10/27/64 at Readville. $325.00 sold

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*7* ORRISON J. DODGE KILLED IN ACTION AT MALVERN HILL


Dodge was an expressman in Haverhill and 23 years-old on 4/16/61, when he enlisted as a private and mustered into Co. D of the 5th on 5/1/61. He mustered out with the regiment on 7/31/61. Like Thomas Salter he reenlisted in the 22nd Massachusetts, enlisting and mustering in to Co. K as a sergeant to date 10/5/61 and becoming First Sergeant on 5/1/62. Like Salter, he became a sacrifice for the country. Where Salter was killed in the first of the Seven Days Battles, Dodge was killed in the last, falling at Malvern Hill on 7/1/62, the last of the engagements of McClellan’s withdrawal down the Peninsula, which he called a strategic “Change of Base,” but most regarded as a simple retreat. KIA $525.00

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*8* HENRY J. SMITH

Smith was a 23 year old resident of Haverhill when he enlisted as a private on 4/16/61 and mustered into Co. D on 5/1/61. He served with the regiment until muser out on 7/31/61 at Boston. $295.00

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*9* LYMAN P. BROMLEY

Bromley was a hatter in Haverhill. He enlisted 4/16/61 as a private and mustered into Co. D on 5/1/61 and mustered out 7/31/61. He enlisted again in the 17th Mass, like Leonard Sawyer, mustering in to Co. G. on 8/13/62, with whom he served until being discharged for disability on 2/12/63. He then tried his luck again in 1864, mustering in to Co. G of the 4th Mass Cavalry, but never left the state, dying of disease in Haverhill on 3/16/64. $325.00

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*10* NATHANIEL M. EDWARDS

Like other members of Co. D of  the 5th Mass, Nathaniel Marsh Edwards was from Haverhill, where he worked as a 23 year old civil engineer. He enlisted as a sergeant on 4/16/61. mustered in on 5/1/61, and mustered out 7/31/61. His engineering background, however, was put to use in a second enlistment. He mustered into Co. G of the 1st NY Engineers on 11/8/61 and was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant 12/5/62; 1st Lieut. 3/15/64, and Captain on 1/12/65. The regiment served largely in the Department of the South in the 10th Army Corps, taking part in the engagements at Port Royal, Battery Vulcan, Fort Pulaski, James Island, Seccessionville, Morris Island, Fort Wagner, and others. Parts of the regiment also served with the Army of the James. During its service the regiment lost in action 2 officers and 24 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded. Edwards survived to muster out on 7/19/65 at Hilton Head, SC, and after the war moved to Appleton, Wisconsin. $325.00

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*11* HENRY H. PARMELEE DIED OF WOUNDS

Parmelee or Parmlee, was a married paper hanger in Haverhill. Standing 5 foot 5 inches, with brown hair and blue eyes, he enlisted in Co. D of the 5th Mass on 4/16/61 and mustered into Co. D on 5/1/61. He mustered out 7/31/61, and then reenlisted in Co. M of the 1st Mass. Heavy Artillery on 3/1/62 as corporal, making sergeant in October. The regiment spent its early service in and around Washington. In the Spring of 1864, however, it was one of the heavy artillery regiments pulled out of Washington by Grant to serve as infantry in the 2nd Army Corps in his overland campaign against Richmond. Parmelee survived the horrendous fighting at Spottsylvania, where the regiment lost at least 56 killed, the fighting at Cold Harbor, and the June 16, 1864 assault on Petersburg. His luck ran out on June 22, however, when he was one of 44 men in the regiment wounded 6/22/64 in further fighting and died of his wounds 7/2/64 at the US General Hospital in Philadelphia, according to the surgeons, “from exhaustion after gunshot wound.” $495.00

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*12* CHARLES K. KNOWLES DIED OF WOUNDS AT GETTYSBURG

Knowles was a sailor by profession. He enlisted at age 23 in East Haverhill as a private on 4/16/61, mustered in to Co. D on 5/1/61 and mustered out 7/31/61 at Boston. Like many in the regiment he reenlisted, mustering in to Co. H of the 22nd Mass. on 9/7/61 as a sergeant. He received a commission as 2nd Lieutenant on 12/16/62 in Co. D and 1st Lieutenant on or about 6/1/63. The regiment was in Porter’s Division of the Army of the Potomac, then briefly in the 3rd Corps, before joining the 5th Corps in May. They saw light action at Yorktown on the Peninsula, but really got slammed at Gaines Mill, where they lost some 68 killed and 126 wounded when Lee hit McClellan’s right. They took casualties again at Malvern Hill, were in reserve at Antietam, but saw 4 killed and 52 wounded at Fredericksburg. At Gettysburg they were part of Tilton’s brigade of Barnes’ Division, which was rushed in to support Sickles after he pushed the 3rd Corps out to just where Lee thought it would be. The regiment got caught in the fighting at the Wheatfield. Knowles was one of 27 men wounded in the engagement and died of his wounds nine days later, on July 11. $750.00 sold

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*13* THOMAS KEIF PRVT. D. 5th REG CONVICTED OF MURDER

Thomas Keif (or Kief) was a shoemaker, 19 years of age, when he enlisted in Haverhill on 4/16/61 and mustered in to Co. D on 5/1/61. He mustered out 7/31/61. He enlisted again in September, but thought better of walking, enrolling in Co. L of the 1st Mass Cavalry on 9/23/61 as a corporal. The regiment first saw service in early 1862 around Hilton Head, NC. Keif’s company was part of the regiment’s third battalion, which remained behind when the other two battalions went to Virginia and served independently at Beaufort, Hilton Head, Folly Island and Morris Island, as well at the expedition to St. John’s River, Florida. For a while designated the Independent Battalion Mass. Cavalry, they were redesignated the 4th Mass. Cavalry. Kief reenlisted as a veteran as of 1/1/64 and was with the battalion redesignated the 4th Mass Cavalry on 2/12/64. He was promoted sergeant 7/1/64, 1st Sergeant 3/13/65, 2nd Lieutenant on 4/6/65, and commissioned 1st Lieutenant 7/13/65, but not mustered. The regiment lost 4 officers and 22 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded during its service. It took part in various expeditions in South Carolina and Florida. Starting in May 1864 parts of the regiment started moving north to join the Army of the James, some becoming part of the 10th Corps and a few being detached to the 24th and 25th. Company L was one of three companies at the Headquarters of the Army of the James that were ordered to hold High Bridge over the Appomattox River. On April 6, 1865, numbering just 13 officers and 67 men, they were almost annihilated. 8 of the officers were killed or wounded, and Kief’s date of promotion to 2nd Lieutenant indicates he was being promoted to replace one of those officers.

The end of the war, however, was only the beginning of his problems. While on occupation duty in Virginia he was ordered to take a detail of five men and arrest one Colonel J.L. Heiskill at Cole’s Station, Virginia. No particular reasons are given in the records for the arrest or information about Heiskill. In any case, Keif found him at the house of his brother-in-law, Dr. George Martin early in the morning of October 3, 1865. The arrest did not go smoothly. Keif ended up shooting Martin, and was arrested for murder in Charlottesville and confined in prison in Richmond. The charge was that he, “did willfully and maliciously kill Dr. George Martin,” a citizen of Albermarle County, Va, “by shooting him through the head with a revolver,” at the residence of Mr. Jesse L. Heiskill of Nelson County on October 3, 1865. Witnesses included several members of the 4th Mass Cavalry, the 67th Ohio, some civilians, a member of the 24th Mass, and “Jim, Colored Boy.”

A southern newspaper reported that when Keif and his detail arrived at the house, “The inmates of the house, among whom was Dr. Martin, Mr. Heiskill’s brother in law, not opening the door instantly to Keif, the latter, who had procured liquor and become intoxicated on his trip, climbed up to the second story of the front porch of the building, and there shot and killed Dr. Martin, who had stepped out into the porch to ascertain who was applying for admittance. Keif haing killed Dr. Martin, fired the remaining charges into the house, one of the bullets seriously wounding Mrs. Heiskill in the hand, and then left.”

While some officers characterized the matter as “complicated,” General Carroll characterized it as a, “wanton murder committed while in a drunken rage.” It was also thought a good idea to reassure the local population that they would be safe under military rule. In any case, Keif was convicted of second degree murder, sentenced to be dismissed from the service and serve 20 years in prison. He was dismissed 11/20/65 and transported to Clinton Prison in New York, at Dannemora to serve his sentence. We lose track of him shortly after, but there are plenty of opportunities for further research. A quick check notes a Thomas Keif being accused of burglary in Michigan in 1889. It’s possibly the same man, pursuing a new line of work, all the result of a military assignment gone very wrong.

$1000.00

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*14* VAN BUREN HOYT D 5th REG

Records list him as Hoyt VanBuren. He was 30 years old, from Haverhill and enlisted as a corporal, mustering into Co. D on 5/1/61, as did everyone else, so great was the rush to get to Washington and defend the nation’s capital. His service covers the First Bull Run Campaign and he mustered out with the regiment 7/31/61. $295.00

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*15* HIRAM S. COLLINS PRVT 5th REG KILLED IN ACTION AT BULL RUN

Collins was 26 years and from Haverhill. No occupation was listed, but he enlisted 4/16/61 and mustered into Co. D as a private on 5/1/61. He was killed in action at First Bull Run on 7/21/61. The regiment was part of Franklin’s Brigade of Heintzelman’s Division, seeing action at Blackburn’s Ford, crossing Sudley Springs and attacking Henry House Hill. Collins was among the 9 killed, 2 wounded, and 23 prisoners lost by the regiment in the opening battle of the war. $595.00 sold

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*16* FRANK DAWSON DIED OF WOUNDS IN THE 1st US CAVALRY RECEIVED AT CEDAR CREEK 1864

Dawson was a 20 year old cordwainer in Haverhill, enlisted 4/16/61, and mustered in 5/1/61. He mustered out with the regiment 7/31/61 at Boston and joined with 22nd Mass on 9/6/61, mustering in to Co. H, as did some others from the 5th. He served with them until 10/28/62, making both corporal and sergeant. This puts him in the regiment during the Peninsular Campaign, where they were heavily hit at Gaines’s Mill, with 68 killed and 126 wounded according to CWdata, and Malvern Hill, where they lost another 9 killed and 43 wounded. (In both sets of numbers the number of killed is low: the wounded category includes those who died of their wounds.) On 10/28/62 Dawson transferred to Co. I of the 1st US Cavalry, with whom he re-enlisted as a veteran as of 2/13/64. This regular army regiment served in the Cavalry Corps of the Army of the Potomac and saw action at Gettysburg, Brandy Station, Trevillian Station, and on many raids and smaller engagements. The outfit was sent to the Shenandoah in 1864 to confront Early, and fate caught up with Dawson at Cedar Creek. He was wounded there on 10/19/64 and died of his wounds three weeks later, on 11/9/64, at Winchester. $495.00

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*17* MATHEW N. GREENLEAF PRVT D 5th REG

Greenleaf was from Exeter, NH, but had been born in Haverhill and seems to have decided to join his old friends, enlisting 4/16/61 and mustering in to Co. D as a private on 5/1/61. He mustered out with the regiment 7/31/61 and then enlisted again, this time mustering into Co. D of the 6th New Hampshire on 11/27/61 as their First Sergeant. The unit was part of Burnside’s Coastal Expedition and became part of his Ninth Corps, taking heavy casualties at Second Bull Run, and seeing action at Antietam and Fredericksburg. It then served in the west until called back for eastern service in Grant’s 1864 Overland Campaign against Richmond. Greenleaf served a full three years, making 2nd Lt. 4/29/62, 1st Lt. 9/12/62, transferring to Co. E, and then being promoted to Captain of Co. H as of 7/1/63. He was wounded at Petersburg 7/30/64 and mustered out for disability on 11/28/64, but was re-commissioned back in Co. C on 3/1/65 and served with them until muster out on 7/17/65. $375.00

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*18* CHARLES E. MILLS PRVT D 5th REG

Mills was listed as a resident of Bradford when he enlisted on 4/16/61 and mustered into Co. D as a private on 5/1/61. He was 18 and a shoemaker by profession. He mustered out with the regiment 7/31/61 and signed into Co. D of the 17th Mass on 2/20/62. The regiment was sent to the Carolina coast and posted at New Bern, taking part in a number of expeditions, such as the relief of Little Washington and engagements such as Blount’s Creek and Batchelder’s Creek. He was wounded in action at Goldsboro, NC, on 12/17/62 and promoted to Corporal on 4/3/63. He mustered out 2/19/65. His residence in the 17th was listed as Haverhill, so he must have had some earlier connection with the town. $375.00

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*19* CHARLES W. JUDGE PRVT D 5th REG

Judge was another member of the 5th who saw service in the 17th Mass. He was 23, and a cordwainer in Haverhill when he enlisted in Co. D of the 5th on 4/16/61 and mustered in on 5/1/61, mustering out 7/31/61. He then mustered into Co. I of the 17th Mass 1/15/62 as sergeant and as First Sergean a month later, on 2/12/62. He served a year with them, being discharged for disability on 1/31/63 at New Bern. At the end of 1864 he signed up again, mustering into Co. B of the 1st Battalion of Massachusetts Cavalry on 12/29/64 and being appointed sergeant on 1/1/65. This was a unit that served with the 26th NY Cavalry along the Canadian frontier, a duty made necessary by the Confederate raid on St. Albans, Vermont, and various Confederate plans to strike prisoner of war camps and free captives. He mustered out on 6/30/65. $350.00 sold

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*20*DANIEL J. HAYNES CORPL D 5th REG

Haynes was one of the vets of the 5th who later saw service in the 22nd Mass. As with most of Co. D, he was a resident of Haverhill. He was 30 years old and a cordwainer. His age may have given him some authority. He enlisted as a corporal on 4/16/61 and mustered into co. D on 5/61/mustering out 7/31/61. He then mustered into Co. H of the 22nd Mass on 9/6/61. He experience in the 5th apparently counted for something. He mustered in as a sergeant and made First Sergeant on or about 1/1/62. He was one of those taken prisoner when the regiment was decimated at Gaines’ Mill on the Peninsula 6/27/62, but returned to the regiment and was promoted Second Lieutenant 9/6/62. He did not live to be mustered in at the rank, however, dying of disease on 9/29/62 at Fortress Monroe. $325.00

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*21* WILLIAM H. STEELE PRVT D 5th REG Wounded in Action at the Wilderness

Like Haynes and others, Steele saw action with the 5th and then joined Co. H of the 22nd Mass. He was an 18 year old clerk from Haverhill, enlisting 4/16/61 and mustering into Co. D as a private 5/1/61, and mustering out 7/31/61 after the Bull Run Campaign. He mustered into Co. H of the 22nd Mass. on 9/7/61 as a sergeant, received as commission as 2nd Lieutenant 12/16/62 and 1st Lieutenant 5/22/63. He was wounded in action at the Wilderness 5/5/64 and mustered out 10/17/64 at Boston. The 22nd was a hard-fighting unit that spent most of its service in the 5th Corps, losing a shocking 9 officers and 207 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded in battles such as Gaines’ Mill, Malvern Hill, Fredericksburg, Gettysburg, Wilderness, Laurel Hill, and Petersburg. $425.00

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*22* ALBERT H. GOULD PRVT D 5th REG

Gould was from Haverhill and enlisted 4/16/61 and mustered in to Co. D as private 5/1/61, the muster only taking place after the regiment had reached Washington. His service covers First Bull Run, and he mustered out with the regiment 7/31/61 at Boston. $295.00

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*23* GEORGE M. WARREN PRVT B 4th REG

George M. Warren served in the 4th Massachusetts, enlisting 4/16/61 and mustering into Co. B of the 4th Mass. as a private on 4/22/61. He was 20 years old and a teamster from Stoughton, Mass. The regiment was the first to leave the state after Fort Sumter, heading for Fortress Monroe on the afternoon of April 17. They saw action at Big Bethel on June 10, 1861, losing 1 killed and 1 wounded in what some regard as the first engagement of the war.

Warren mustered out 7/22/61 at Long Island in Boston Harbor. He signed up again in 1864, mustering in to the 11th Mass. Light Artillery on 1/2/64. The battery spend the opening of 1864 in Washington as part of the 22nd Corps,  but in April was made part of the 9th Army Corps for Grant’s Overland Campaign. They saw action at Wilderness, Spottsylvania and Petersburg, being part of the time detached to the 5th Army Corps, and were credited with 3 enlisted men killed or mortally wounded. Warren survived to muster out 6/16/65. $350.00


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